Japan James Whitlow Delano

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Japan James Whitlow Delano
Datasheet of the exhibition
Japan
James Whitlow Delano
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
2
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Japan
James Whitlow Delano
Curated by
Arianna Rinaldo
Produced by
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE
on the occasion of Cortona On The Move
International Photography Festival 2015
Prints
Bottega Antonio Manta
SP Systema
Frames
Studio Rufus
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Japan
An American-born photographer, James Whitlow Delano has been living in Asia, mostly in Japan,
for over 20 years. He photographs the country with the lucid eyes of a foreigner, but with a profound
knowledge of the country and its culture. He is like a family member that comes to town for a visit,
familiar, but at the same time distant, thereby offering an original insight into the place.
His main work in Japan is collected in an ongoing series called Mangaland. Manga are a typical
style of comic strip historically specific to Japan, with recognizable features, but covering a variety
of genres and themes. And like manga, Japanese culture can be seen as an animated cartoon with
protagonists and adventures - a very peculiar style with underlying criptic messages.
James’ view on Japanese culture is profound and insightful. He goes beyond the surface, the
superficial icons and stereotypes, showing us the heart and soul of a culture that is often shy and
reserved. Japanese people are not loud, they do not express themselves or their emotions publicly.
They prefer to let silence speak and to carry on smiling. Their deep respect for their surroundings
and for others creates a distance which is often impenetrable. James manages to see through it and
to manifest the contradictions and essence of Japanese culture through his unique images. His style
makes them even more unique.
The other part of the work presented here is his documentation of the 2011 tsunami aftermath. The
images in the series Black Tsunami are a journalistic documentary, and at the same time a moving
testimony from the inside. Japan is James’ home and he dutifully registered the disastrous event and
consequences without abandoning his unique style and whole-hearted respect for the region.
His images reveal the-day-after atmosphere in an eerie and cinematographic way. But we are not in
a scary movie here. What we see is real and James was there to create a record of it. A record that
also contributed to the collection of funds to aid the population at a time of disarray. But mostly an
unfinished record that aims to keep attention focused on a situation that, although not headline news
anymore, like many “aftermaths”, still has its long-term effects and is still far from any solution or
conclusion.
Arianna Rinaldo
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Mangaland
Japan is a Mangaland. No other local product describes its energy better than mangas. I have
reached the conclusion that photographing Japan and finding the right words to describe the
prevailing mentality is not an easy task. It’s as if an alternative, impenetrable reality lies just beneath
the surface, peeping out. You can learn a lot about these people by studying their internal world. It’s
a very real world, but full of inconsistencies. A cool nut bears insipid flowers. Their smiles are sullen
and resentful but their impassive faces hide unsuspected human warmth. Our Western values are
overturned, challenged and politely ridiculed. Convictions become relative. Taboos are met with
indifference. They gently toy with them without any apparent feeling, but in the end they always break
them. Then they discreetly toss them aside before returning to work the next morning, possible never
to be break them again.
Here certain freedoms have never existed and have never even been desired, while others are
stillborn. Little importance is attached to the individual. There was no Renaissance here, nor even a
cultural revolution. Nevertheless there are millions of private places within the public spaces on their
overcrowded trains and busy streets, and rarely are these private places violated. They are designed
to avoid unpredictable and potentially embarrassing contact. Designed specifically to alienate, which
is precisely what they do. Through selective amnesia today’s acquaintance is tomorrow’s stranger.
Even though you are quite familiar with him, all of a sudden it becomes risky to say hello to that sales
assistant if you meet him in the street, under entirely different circumstances. Idle gossip is reduced
to empty platitudes and that’s about as far as it goes. But that yearning gaze of a member of the
opposite sex, reflected in the commuter train window, can easily devour and stimulate your fertile
imagination. Each time it happens, your eyes meet just for one fleeting moment, but never again.
That powerful, uncertain twinkling is gone forever, leaving you shaken and yearning for more, fully
aware that it can never be repeated. It is an unbearable, chemical turmoil from all points of view.
Japan is a minefield for fanatics, but totally liberating to an observer who is not bound by its
straitjacket rules of conduct. Its crowded sidewalks are the loneliest places on earth, but you are
rarely physically alone. Human nature is squeezed, remodelled and distilled in the volcanic radiance
that is Japan.
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Black Tsunami
Fearing the worst, with the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melting down, we loaded up a
rented van with extra cans of gasoline, water and food. We crossed Honshu at 3:00 am to the far Sea
of Japan coast. Roads would be clear over there and a spine of volcanic mountains, we believed,
would at least partially protect us from the cloud of radioactivity that transformed from a worst fear
into reality that day. It was a time when the impossible just kept on happening.
By the time we cut back toward the Pacific side of Honshu, the rain had turned to snow. Supply lines
were breaking down. Gas lines for cars extended for mile upon snowy mile, drivers could be seen
huddling against the cold inside. Hours after dark, drivers would leave their cars in line overnight,
returning to them again before dawn.
Survivors shuffled through the mud and snow in a state of shock. Soon we joined these shuffling
masses, feet soaked with freezing cold black mud carried in by the tsunami. Moving inside
provided little relief because inside evacuation centers temperatures hovered below 10° C (50° F)
conditions that leaned heaviest on the very young and the very old. No words were necessary for
communication. It was there I first encountered a peculiar ‘infinity-stare,’ born of worry, cold, hunger
and lack of sleep. It would become a familiar expression in the time ahead.
The first thing forgotten, when confronted by disaster, are the raw moments. Maybe it is a built-in
human defense mechanism to protect us. Without them, all the hard edges are able to soften and
the knife-slicing survival instincts start to fade to extinction like most dreams do in the morning. This
collection of photographs was a conscious effort to remember from where the people of Tohoku have
emerged. It is seared into their DNA now but, already, even the tsunami survivors’ memories have
begun to blur over time. Recently, I have mined these memories before they inevitably evaporate.
This Black Tsunami series is a part of that process.
Four years on, some of the spiritual wounds have scabbed over, others never will but the people of
Tohoku have made significant progress putting their lives back together. Their struggle, especially for
the residents from the nuclear no-entry zone, is far from over.
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
James Whitlow Delano
James Whitlow Delano has lived in Asia for over 20 years. His work has been awarded
internationally: the Alfred Eisenstadt Award (from Columbia University and Life Magazine), Leica’s
Oskar Barnack, Picture of the Year International, NPPA Best of Photojournalism, PDN and others for
work from China, Japan, Afghanistan and Burma, etc. His first monograph book, Empire: Impressions
from China was the first ever one-person show of photography at La Triennale di Milano Museum
of Art. The Mercy Project/Inochi his charity photo book for hospice received the PX3 Gold Award
and the Award of Excellence from Communication Arts. His work has appeared in magazines
and photo festivals on five continents. His latest award-winning monograph book, Black Tsunami:
Japan 2011 (FotoEvidence) explored the aftermath of Great East Japan Earthquake, Tsunami and
Nuclear disaster. He’s a grantee for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, for work documenting
the destruction of equatorial rainforests and human rights violations of indigenous inhabitants there.
In 2015, Delano founded EverydayClimateChange Instagram feed, where photographers from six
continents document global climate change on seven continents.
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Title
Japan
Photographer
James Whitlow Delano
Number of photos
40
2
Prints (different dimensions)
“Blow Up” prints on Communication, border black
Type
40
Blacj and white, printed on CansonPhotographique Satin
paper, mounted on dibond and in floating frames
Black and white, printed on Communication
Print size
36
4
1
1
50x60 cm (on CansonPhotographique Satin paper)
100x120 cm (on CansonPhotographique Satin paper,)
124x150 cm (Blow Up)
155,5x200 cm (Blow Up)
Frame size
36
52,5x62,5 cm. Thickness of 0,5 cm, Deph of 8 cm
Color black
102,5x122 cm. Thickness of 0,5 cm, Deph of 8 cm
Color black
4
Linear development
Set up
Shipping
30mt minimum required linear space (whithout Blow Up)
2
hooks on the back for frames, slider system for “Blow up”
Panel: intro, bio (text in appendix) and title, must be printed
at the expense of the hosting organization
5
1
1
boxes 80x69x60 cm
box 129x46x109 cm
box 250x150x8
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PRINTS
MANGALAND
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
1
50x60
52,5x62,5
2
50x60
52,5x62,5
3
50x60
52,5x62,5
4
50x60
52,5x62,5
5
50x60
52,5x62,5
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
MANGALAND
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
6
50x60
52,5x62,5
7
50x60
52,5x62,5
8
50x60
52,5x62,5
9
50x60
52,5x62,5
10
50x60
52,5x62,5
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
MANGALAND
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
11
50x60
52,5x62,5
12
50x60
52,5x62,5
13
50x60
52,5x62,5
14
50x60
52,5x62,5
15
50x60
52,5x62,5
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
MANGALAND
10
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
16
50x60
52,5x62,5
17
50x60
52,5x62,5
18
50x60
52,5x62,5
19
50x60
52,5x62,5
20
50x60
52,5x62,5
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
MANGALAND
11
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
21
50x60
52,5x62,5
22
100x120
102,5x122
23
100x120
102,5x122
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
BLACK TSUNAMI
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
24
50x60
52,5x62,5
25
50x60
52,5x62,5
26
50x60
52,5x62,5
27
50x60
52,5x62,5
28
50x60
52,5x62,5
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
BLACK TSUNAMI
13
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
29
50x60
52,5x62,5
30
50x60
52,5x62,5
31
50x60
52,5x62,5
32
50x60
52,5x62,5
33
50x60
52,5x62,5
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
BLACK TSUNAMI
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
34
50x60
52,5x62,5
35
50x60
52,5x62,5
36
50x60
52,5x62,5
37
50x60
52,5x62,5
38
50x60
52,5x62,5
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
PRINTS
BLACK STUSNAMI
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
Image size
cm (height x base)
Frame size
cm (height x base)
39
100x120
102,5x122
40
100x120
102,5x122
BLOW UP
19
155x200
20
60x90
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
CAPTIONS
Black Tsunami
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
FILE NAME
PICTURE
17
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
ENG
ITA
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami BIG 002
An ocean going ship sits where it came to rest in the debris of
the great 25m high (82 ft.) tsunami that hit Kesennuma, Miyagi
Prefecture following the massive earthquake that struck under
the sea off of Japan
Una nave da oceano ferma dove è arrivata per rimanere, sui detriti
dell'onda, alta 25 metri (82 piedi), dello tsunami che ha devastato
Kesennuma, nella prefettura di Miyagi, in seguito al tremendo
terremoto che ha colpito il mar del Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami BIG 004
An elderly woman shuffles through a city wiped off the face of
the earth by the tsunami which arrived 30 minutes after the
largest earthquake in Japan's recorded history, RikuzenTakata, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. In Rikuzen-Takata 10,547
residents, nearly half the population of roughly 26,000 people,
are living in evacuation shelters. Japan Self Defence Forces
say they have found 300 to 400 bodies there. About 5,000 of
the city's houses were submerged by the quake-triggered
tsunami
Un’anziana donna si trascina attraverso la città spazzata via dalla
faccia della terra dallo tsunami che arrivò 30 minuti dopo il terremoto
più largo mai registrato nella storia del Giappone. Rikuzen-Takata,
prefettura di Iwate, Giappone. A Rikuzen-Takata, 10.547 cittadini,
quasi la metà della popolazione di 26.000 persone, vivono tuttora in
rifugi da evacuati. Le forze della Difesa giapponese dicono di aver
trovato qua fra i 300 e i 400 cadaveri. Circa 5.000 case della città
sono state sommerse dallo tsunami innescato dal terremoto
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 003
Rescue workers pause from work for a collective prayer for the
dead a week after the precise moment the tsunami struck
Ofunato, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. The number of missing or
dead has topped 26,000 and the confirmed death toll has risen
to over 10,000 people
Le squadre di salvataggio in una pausa dal lavoro per la preghiera
collettiva in onore dei morti, esattamente una settimana dopo il
momento in cui lo tsunami colpì Ofunato, nella prefettura di Iwate,
Giappone. Il numero dei dispersi e dei morti ha raggiunto 26.000, di
cui oltre 10.000 sono le vittime accertate
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 014
A car has been bent and deposited on the rail of high bridge
submerged in the tsunami waters at Kamaishi, Iwate
Prefecture, Japan. The building in the background, despite
being atop an embankment had tsunami waters reach the
second storey
Una macchina è stata piegata e scaraventata sulla carreggiata
dell’alto ponte sommerso dall’onda dello Tsunami a Kamaishi, regione
di Iwate, Giappone. I palazzi sullo sfondo, pur essendo in cima ad un
terrapieno, sono stati raggiunti dall'acqua dello tsunami fino al
secondo piano
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 021
There was no escape. Resident of Rikuzen-Takata walks at
the high water mark of the great tsunami several kilometers
from the sea and still lumber is piled up on rooftops. The rest of
the city was completely leveled
Non c'era possibilità di fuga. Un cittadino di Rikuzen-Takata cammina
sulla linea creata dal livello raggiunto dall'acqua trasportata dallo
tsunami. È a numerosi chilometri di distanza dal mare e il legname è
ancora accatastato sui tetti. Il resto della città fu completamente
spianato
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 023
A sumi-yoshino cherry tree, the symbol of rebirth in Japanese
culture, has survived the devastating tsunami and blossomed
as spring returns to the Tohoku region of Japan. Ofunato, Iwate
Prefecture, Japan
Un albero di ciliegie sumi-yoshino, simbolo della rinascita nella cultura
giapponese, sopravvissuto al devastante tsunami, è di nuovo
sbocciato come se la primavera tornasse nella regione di Tohoku.
Ofunato, prefettura di Iwate, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 024
Recovery workers, probably police, wearing full-body white
suits to protect them from radiation, enter the 20 km (12.4
miles) nuclear no-entry zone in a police bus at the main check
point on Route 6. Minami Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.
Recovery workers enter the no-entry zone to search for the
bodies of the missing but the danger of radiation exposure has
greatly slowed their progress
Squadre di recupero, probabilmente della polizia, indossano una tuta
bianca a copertura totale del corpo per proteggersi dalle radiazioni, e
entrano nella zona nucleare di 20 km (12.4 miglia) chiusa, in un
autobus della polizia al check point principale sulla strada 6. Minami
Soma, prefettura di Fukushima, Giappone. Le squadre di recupero
entrano nella zona chiusa per cercare i corpi dei dispersi, ma il rischio
di esporsi alle radiazioni ha notevolmente rallentato le loro ricerche
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 025
Police from Tokyo man the main check point on Route 6 on the
southern side of the nuclear no-entry zone in front of J Village,
originally built as a national training facility for young Japanese
football (soccer) players, which is now used as a staging facility
for workers to don radiation protection suits for work at the
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Hironomachi,
Fukushima Prefection, Japan
La polizia giunta da Tokyo al check point principale della strada 6 nel
lato Sud della zona nucleare chiusa davanti al J Village,
originariamente costruito come centro di allenamento nazionale per i
giovani calciatori giapponesi, adesso è usato come sede per i
lavoratori che indossano tute protettive anti-radiazioni per lavorare
nell'impianto nucleare Daiichi di Fukushima. Hironomachi, prefettura di
Fukushima, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 028
Route 6 completely failed and crumbled away during the
massive 11 March 2011 earthquake at the main southern
police checkpoint of the nuclear no-entry zone. Hironomachi,
Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
La Route 6 è completamente franata, sbriciolata dal terremoto del
2011, all'altezza del principale check point della polizia nella zona Sud
della zona nucleare chiusa. Hironomachi, prefettura di Fukushima,
Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 045
Barrier, demarkating the 20 km nuclear no-entry zone, has
become overgrown with vines 6 months after the crisis began.
Near Minami Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. As of
midnight 21 April 2011, the Japanese government declared the
no-entry zone off-limits under the Disaster Countermeasures
Basic Law which gives the police the power to detain anyone
entering the zone for up to 30 days and impose a fine of up
100,000 JPY (US$1,200).
Lo sbarramento, che delimita la zona nucleare chiusa di 20 km, è
stato ricoperto dalle vigne 6 mesi dopo l'inizio della crisi. Vicino
Minami Soma, prefettura di Fukushima, Giappone. A mezzanotte del
21 aprile 2011, il governo giapponese dichiarò la zona off-limits in
base alla legge per le catastrofi naturali che dà alla polizia il potere di
impedire a chiunque di entrare nella zona per 30 giorni e impone una
sanzione fino a 100.000 Yen giapponesi (1.200 dollari americani).
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
FILE NAME
PICTURE
18
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
ENG
ITA
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 069
Fisherman lost in thought gazing out toward a huge, permanent
dump site that has risen across the Kitakami River from the
main part of Ishinomaki in the tsunami zone, raising worries
about air born asbestos and dioxins, and contamination of the
ground and river water. Miyagi Prefecture, Japan
Un pescatore perso nei suoi pensieri, osservando all'orizzonte
un'enorme discarica permanente creatasi lungo il fiume Kitakamu
dalla parte principale di Ishinomaki, nella zona dello tsunami, che crea
preoccupazione per la diossina e l'amianto dispersi in aria, e la
contaminazione del suolo e delle acque del fiume. Prefettura di
Miyagi. Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 077
Lumber from houses destroyed by the 11 March tsunami is
piled high at a permanent dump site where a crane can be
seen spraying water because the wood has been catching fire
due to spontaneous combustion from the heat and methane
emitted during decompostion. The spontaneous combustion
adversely affects the local air quality. Yuriage, Miyagi
Prefecture, Japan
Il legname delle case distrutte dallo tsunami dell'11 marzo accatastato
su una discarica permanente dove si intravede una gru spruzzare
acqua sul legno che ha preso fuoco per l'autocombustione, causata
dal metano e dal calore emessi durante la decomposizione. La
combustione spontanea intacca la qualità dell'aria del posto. Yuriage,
Miyagi Prefecture, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 079
Once a great pine forest of 70,000 trees, covered the
oceanfront at Takata Matsubara until the 11 March 2011
tsunami swept through decimating them all. Now the sea under
cuts the roots beneath their stumps, giving them an other
worldly appearance. Rikuzen-Takata, Iwate Prefecture, Japan
Un tempo una grande foresta di 70.000 pini copriva la spiaggia
sull'Oceano di Takata Matsubara, finché lo tsunami dell'11 marzo l'ha
spazzata via, decimandoli tutti. Adesso il mare taglia le radici sotto i
loro moncherini, dando agli alberi un altro aspetto surreale. RikuzenTakata, Iwate Prefecture, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
FotoEvidence
BlackTzunami
MEDIUM 080
Cherry blossoms have open on a tree that seems to rise right
out of the rubble. Ofunato, Iwate Prefecture, Japan
Alcuni fiori di ciliegio sbocciati su un albero che sembra spuntare fuori
dalle macerie.
Ofunato, prefettura di Iwate, Giappone
JAMES DELANO Fuku
Nuke 6 Months Aft
MEDIUM 012
A persistent concern among families forced to evacuate
because of the Fukushima Dai Ichi meltdown was that they
would be denied visitation to their families graves. Families
living just few hundred meters outside the nuclear exclusion
zone but the tsunami zone, have cleaned their families during
the O-bon holiday when families traditionally the spirits of the
departed and scrub their ancestors grave stones. Near
Kaibama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
Una preoccupazione che ancora persiste fra le famiglie che sono
dovuto evacuare perché la centrale Dai Ichi di Fukushima stava
collassando, è che gli sarebbe stato impedito visitare le tombe di
famiglia. Le famiglie che vivono solo poche centinaia di metri fuori la
zona nucleare, ma ancora in quella colpita dallo tsunami, hanno pulito
le loro tombe di famiglia durante le festività dell'O-bon, quando
tradizionalmente i giapponesi onorano lo spirito dei defunti e lucidano
le lapidi degli antenati. Vicino Kaibama, prefettura di Fukushima,
Giappone
Daibutsu (Great Buddha), cast in bronze in 1252, sits in the
open air in Kamakura, Japan but it originally housed inside a
temple building until an earthquake-trigger tsunami swept away
the building, leaving the 13.35 meter high (44 ft.) sitting forever
in the Kanto Plain. Over 100,000 people died in the Great
Kanto Earthquake in 1923 as firestorms swept across the city,
raising entire districts. The great quake moved Daibutsu 2/3 of
a meter (2ft.). 40,000 people went missing. The Japanese
government considered moving the nation's capital from Tokyo,
as commentators attributed the disaster as divine retribution
against Japanese people for living "extravagant" lifestyles.
There have been major earthquakes in Tokyo in 1703, 1855
and 1923. 91 years have passed and many are worried that
Tokyo is overdue for another mega-earthquake.
Daibutsu (il Grande Buddha), un bronzo del 1252, giace all'aria aperta
a Kamakura, Giappone, ma originariamente era situato in un tempio a
lui dedicato, finché uno tsunami non ha spazzato via l'edificio,
lasciando per sempre la statua di 13.35 metri (44 piedi) sulla piana di
Kanto. Oltre 100.000 persone morirono nel grande terremoto di Kanto
nel 1923 e tempeste di fuoco lambirono interi quartieri. Il grande
terremoto spostò Daibutsu di circa 65 centimetri (2 piedi). 40.000
persone risultarono disperse. Il governo giapponese prese in
considerazione l'idea di spostare la capitale dello Stato da Tokyo,
poiché alcuni opinionisti attribuivano il disastro alla punizione divina
contro i giapponesi, rei di avere "stravaganti" stili di vita. Ci sono stati
terremoti peggiori a Tokyo, nel 1703, 1855 e nel 1923. Sono passati
91 anni e in molti temono che Tokyo si avvicini all'appuntamento con
un altro mega terremoto.
A sumi-yoshino cherry tree, the symbol of rebirth in Japanese
culture, has survived the devastating tsunami and was not in
the path of a ocean going boat. Its blossoms have opened as
spring returns to the Tohoku region of Japan. Ofunato, Iwate
Prefecture, Japan
Un albero di ciliegie sumi-yoshino, simbolo della rinascita nella cultura
giapponese, sopravvissuto al devastante tsunami, è di nuovo
sbocciato come se la primavera tornasse nella regione giapponese di
Tohoku. Ofunato, prefettura di Iwate, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Japan Seismic
MEDIUM 021
JAMES DELANO
Sakura in Tsunami
Zone MEDIUM 003
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
CAPTIONS
Mangaland
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
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DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
PICTURE
ENG
ITA
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland BIG 056
Lead singer and the karaoke swooner.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
Un cantante e l'amante del karaoke.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland BIG 092
In the path of lenses and avoiding them in front of Kaminari Gate,
Senso-Ji Temple, Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan
Tra l’obiettivo della camera e il soggetto, cercando di evitarlo, di
fronte all’ingresso Kaminari, Tempio di Senso-Ji, Asakusa, Tokyo,
Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
002
Elevated monorail.
Shiodome, Tokyo, Japan
Monorotaia sopraelevata.
Shiodome, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
006
Newsstand at night.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
Edicola di notte.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
007
Cycling across Sumida River Bridge in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan
In bicicletta sul ponte del fiume Sumida. Asakusa, Tokyo,
Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
010
Under umbrella in nighttime rain.
Hachiko Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
Con l'ombrello sotto la pioggia notturna.
Hachiko Shibuya, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
013
Bra advert behind homeless man slumped on bench.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
La pubblicità di un reggiseno dietro un senzatetto accasciato su
una panchina.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
014
Resting eyes in a Yurakucho coffee shop.
Tokyo, Japan
Riposando gli occhi in un coffee shop di Yurakucho.
Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
020
"Momiji" bonsai.
Hatagaya, Tokyo, Japan
Un bonsai "Momiji".
Hatagaya. Tokyo, Giappone
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
PICTURE
ENG
ITA
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
023
Conspiratorial schoolboys underneath expressway.
Shin Koiwa, Chiba, Japan
Studenti in atteggiamento cospirativo sotto la superstrada.
Shin Koiwa, Chiba, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
035
Relentless flow of Tokyo commuters up from the subway.
Japan
Il flusso implacabile dei pendolari nella metropolitana di Tokyo.
Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
054
Passing anime characters after work.
Takadanobaba, Tokyo, Japan
Passando accanto i personaggi dei cartoni animati.
Takadanobaba, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
059
"Gal-o" boy touts on the prowl for young women to recruit for
"modeling agencies", sometimes simply a gateway into work in
hostess bars or the water trade.
Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
"Gal-o" boys, ragazzi bagarino in cerca di giovani donne da
reclutare per "agenzie di modelle", una strada che a volte porta
esclusivamente a lavorare come hostess nei bar o nel commercio
dell'acqua.
Shibuya, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
060
Rainy season nighttime express train to Kyoto.
Osaka, Japan
Un treno espresso notturno per Kyoto, nella stagione delle
piogge.
Osaka, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
076
Shinjuku Minami Guchi I, South Exit.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
Shinjuku Minami Guchi I, uscita Sud.
Shinjuku, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
082
Buddha looks out from giant television screen.
Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
Buddha osserva da un gigantesco schermo televisivo.
Shibuya, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
084
Look directly at the sun.
Nishi-Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
Guardando direttamente il sole.
Nishi-Shinjuku, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
090
Train platform well after rush hour.
Shinjuku Station, Tokyo, Japan
Le rotaie di una stazione ferroviaria dopo le ore più affollate.
Shinjuku Station, Tokyo, Giappone
A recovering "hikikomori" in the bedroom of his apartment. Gyotoku,
Chiba, Japan.
Un "hikikomori" convalescente nella camera da letto del suo
appartamento di Gyotoku, Chiba, Giappone.
Hikikomori, which in Japanese means "pull away" are generally
young men (80%) who isolate themselves from the outside world
seeking shelter in their rooms often for years at a time.
Gli hikikomori, che in giapponese significa "strappato via", sono
generalmente (per l'80%) giovani uomini che si isolano dal
mondo esterno cercando riparo nelle loro camere, spesso anche
per vari anni.
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
093
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
FILE NAME
PICTURE
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
ENG
ITA
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
095 (Dark)
Pony tails, piercing glance and a cigarette.
Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
Codini, sguardo penetrante e una sigaretta.
Shibuya, Tokyo, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
118
Cheerleaders for Japanese baseball team on opening day.
Chiba, Japan
Cheerleaders di una squadra di baseball giapponese durante
l'inaugurazione.
Chiba, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
123
Maiko geisha taking group snapshot.
Kyoto, Japan
Geisha Maiko si fanno una foto di gruppo.
Kyoto, Giappone
JAMES DELANO
Mangaland MEDIUM
158
Pressed against the door on the Yamanote Line during morning rush
hour.
Shinjuku Station, Tokyo, Japan
Passeggeri in metro pressati contro la porta della linea
Yamanote, durante le affollate ore mattutine.
Shinjuku Station, Tokyo, Giappone
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
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Japan - James Whitlow Delano
BLOW UP
FILE NAME
JAMES
DELANO
BLOW_UP //
Japan Seismic
001
JAMES
DELANO
BLOW_UP //
Japan Seismic
020
PICTURE
ENG
Aso Volcano erupts sending ash outward from its central mountain
pedestal, out over rich farmland that occupies this the bottom of a
massive and ancient caldera. Japanese accept that their verdant country,
dense with mountains, dense with 135 volcanoes, dense with humanity,
sits on a very active part of the Pacific Ring of Fire. Kumamoto
Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan. In recent months, five volcanoes ((Aso,
Ontake, Kuchinoerabu, Asama & Hakone) have erupted and there has
been a major earthquake. Many experts, and not a few residents, worry
that, since the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster, that
Japan has entered into an era of increased seismic activity.
Two Kobe University researchers, Yoshiyuki Tatsumi and Keiko Suzuki,
declared that it was 'not an overstatement' to state there is a 1% chance
that a colossal volcanic eruption in the next 100 years on the island of
Kyushu that could immediately bury 7 million people there and create a
toxic gas and ash cloud making this nation of 127 million people
"uninhabitable".
The sun sets behind Mt. Fuji as seen from the Tokyo Metropolitan
megapolis. Mt. Fuji, Japan's highest mountain (3,776m / 12388 ft) and the
symbol of the nation is an active volcano. Mt. Fuji sits 100 km away from
the Tokyo metropolitan area megapolis of 30 million people. It is also
about due to erupt, as it last erupted in 1707. Retired Ryukyu University
professor Masaki Kimura believes it should haver erupted in 2011 (with a
four-year margin of error) because the pressure in the magma chamber is
believed to be higher than it was when it last erupted over 400 years ago,
which was triggered by a massive earthquake in Osaka. Many believe
that the massive earthquake in 2011 could be such a trigger.
An eruption of Mt. Fuji, a committee of experts believe, would cause the
worst damage to the city of Shizuoka at the base of the mountan and
580,000 people would need to evacuate due to lava and pyroclastic flows,
TV Asahi reported early in 2014. Volcanic ash could be carried to the
Tokyo metropolitan area affecting air, rail and roads, and highways.
More worrisome, Professor Kimura says that magma is rising and cracks
in the earth have been growing. The water level in Lake Sai, at the
volcanoes base rose by a meter after the Tohoku earthquake and
tsunami, suggesting he says that the rising magma is melting Fuji's
permafrost, which finds its way to the lake.
ITA
Il vulcano Aso erutta mandando cenere dal suo piedistallo centrale,
verso la ricca terra agricola che si trova ai piedi del suo massiccio e
antico bacino. I giapponesi accettano che la loro terra fertile, piena di
montagne, ricca di umanità e di 135 vulcani, si trovi sopra una zona
molto attica del Cerchio di Fuoco del Pacifico. Prefettura di Kumamoto,
Kyushu, Giappone. Recentemente, cinque vulcani ((Aso, Ontake,
Kuchinoerabu, Asama & Hakone) sono eruttati e c'è stato un forte
terremoto. Molti esperti, e non pochi residenti, sono preoccupati che, da
marzo 2011, con il terremoto, lo tsunami e il disastro nucleare, il
Giappone sia entrato in un'era di crescente attività sismica.
Due ricercatori dell'Università di Kobe, Yoshiyuki Tatsumi and Keiko
Suzuki, hanno dichiarato che non è una esagerazione dire che c'è un
1% di probabilità che una colossale eruzione vulcanica avvenga
nell'siola di Kyushu nei prossimi centanni, e che possa immediatamente
interrare 7 milioni di persone e creare una nube di gas e cenere tossica,
rendendo l'intera nazione di 127 milioni di abitanti, inabitabile.
Il tramonto dietro al Monte Fuji, con vista dalla metropoli di Tokyo. Il
Monte Fuji (3,776 metri/12388 piedi) è la montagna più alta del
Giappone, che adotta il vulcano come simbolo nazionale. La montagna
si trova a 100 km di distanza dalla zona metropolitana di Tokyo, dove
vivono 30 milioni di persone. Il vulcano ha eruttato nel 1707, ma presto
dovrebbe riattivarsi, secondo le previsioni. Masaki Kimura, un
professore in pensione della Ryukyu University, crede che il vulcano
avrebbe già dovuto eruttare nel 2011 (con un margine di errore di 4
anni) perché il livello della pressione del magma era già più elevato
dell'ultima eruzione avvenuta 400 anni fa, causata da un grande
terremoto a Osaka. Molti credono che il devastante terremoto del 2011
potrebbe essere la cause scatenante di una nuova eruzione.
Il comitato scientifico crede che i danni più devastanti si avrebbero nella
città di Shizuoka che si trova ai piedi della montagna. Se così fosse,
secondo quanto affermato dalla TV Asahi nel 2014, 580.000 persone
dovrebbero evacuare la zona a causa dell'esteso flusso di lava. La
cenere vulcanica potrebbe arrivare fino alla zona metropolitana di
Tokyo danneggiando aria, strade, ferrovie e autostrade.
Ancora più preoccupanti, secondo il professore Kimura, sono il livello
del magma che sta salendo e le crepe che stanno aumentando. Il livello
dell'acqua del lago Sai, che si trova ai piedi del vulcano, si è alzato di un
metro dopo il terremoto e lo tsunami di Tohoku. Secondo Kimura questo
è la causa del livello elevato del magma che sta sciogliendo il
permafrost del Monte Fuji.
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
DATASHEET OF THE EXHIBITION
Japan - James Whitlow Delano
CONTACTS
Antonio Carloni
[email protected]
+39 328 6438076
Sarah Carlet
[email protected]
+39 339 8437083
Simona Nandesi
[email protected]
+39 338 8109584
Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE | Località Vallone, 39/A/4 - Cortona, 52044 (AR)
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