Subject descriptions - Melbourne Global Mobility

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Subject descriptions - Melbourne Global Mobility
The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai
SPRING SEMESTER 2012
Course Catalogue
Faculty
Via della Vigna Nuova, 18 50123 Firenze
Tel: +39 055. 2645910 Fax: +39 055.2646721
Table of Contents
COURSE SYLLABI:
ANTHROPOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY:
Identity and Culture in Italy: a Comparative Approach
1
Cultural Literacy Workshops:
Pathways to Intercultural Competence
5
ARCHITECTURE:
Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
8
Architecture Design Studio
14
Interior Architecture Studio
21
Architecture in Context
27
The Villa and the Garden
32
History of Italian Design
37
Architecture in Italy: History & Preservation
40
ART HISTORY:
The Art of Florence: Exploring Visual Culture
45
Special Topics in Art History: Leonardo
51
History of Italian Art II: Michelangelo to Bernini
55
STUDIO ART:
The Art of Buon Fresco
59
Drawing: The Human Figure
64
Beginning Oil Painting: Imagery of Florence
68
Introduction to Photography: Portfolio of Florence
74
CLASSICS:
Ancient Rome: Civilization and Legacy
79
Archaeology and Art of Ancient Italy
83
HISTORY & POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Florence: The Story of the City
87
The History and Culture of Food: A Comparative Analysis
91
History and Politics of Modern Italy:
From WWII to Present
97
The European Union
103
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS:
Special Topics: The Business of Art: the Economics and
Management of Culture
108
Family Business in Italy
114
ITALIAN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, LANGUAGE & LITERATURE:
The Florence Experience I: Beginning Italian I
119
The Florence Experience II: Beginning Italian II
123
The Florence Experience III: Intermediate Italian I
127
The Florence Experience IV: Intermediate Italian I
131
The Florence Experience V: Advanced Italian
135
Readings in Italian Literature: A Journey into the Italian Theatre
139
Shifting Identities:
Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence
144
PSYCHOLOGY:
Cross-Cultural Psychology
149
FACULTY CURRICULA VITAE:
Carlo Achilli,
Laurea, University of Rome
Master in Pianificazione, Conservazione e Gestione
dei Centri Storici Minori e dei Sistemi Paesistico – Ambientali,
University of Rome
Licensed Architect
154
Emanuela Agostini
Ph.D., University of Florence
159
Stefano U. Baldassarri,
Ph.D. Yale University
161
Serena Baldini,
Laurea, University of Florence
Master in Didattica della Lingua e della Cultura Italiana,
Università Ca' Foscari, Venice
170
Erika Bianchi,
Ph.D. University of Florence
173
Pierluca Birindelli,
Ph.D. University of Florence
176
Silvia Catitti,
Ph.D. University of Rome
Licensed Architect
182
Enrico Cecconi,
Laurea, University of Pisa
Master Candidate in Didattica e promozione della lingua e
cultura italiane a stranieri, Master Itals XII,
Università Ca' Foscari, Venice
186
Paolo Di Nardo,
Ph.D. University of Florence
Licensed Architect
190
Peter Fischer,
Ph.D. European University Institute, Florence
191
Diletta Frescobaldi,
Laurea, University of Florence
195
Michael W. Kwakkelstein,
Ph.D. University of Leiden, The Netherlands
198
Tiziano Lucchesi,
M.F.A. Academy of Fine Arts, Florence
202
Gloria Marco Munuera,
Ph.D. RMIT University, Melbourne,
207
David Marini,
Laurea, University of Florence
M.A. University of Connecticut
211
Francesca Marini,
Ph.D. University of Florence
217
Carolina Megale,
Ph.D. University of Florence
221
Monica Merli
Ph.D. University of Florence
226
Riccardo Pacciani,
Ph.D. University of Florence
229
Simone Paoli,
Ph.D. University of Florence
236
Franco Pisani,
Laurea, University of Florence
Licensed Architect
246
Pierpaolo Rapanà,
Laurea, University of Florence,
Ph.D. Candidate, University of Florence,
Licensed Architect
248
Alessandro Raveggi,
Ph.D. University of Bologna
251
Catia Santi
Laurea, University of Florence
260
Daniela Sinicropi,
Laurea, University of Florence,
Ph.D. Candidate, University of Florence,
Licensed Architect
262
Christian Tarchi,
Ph.D. University of Florence
267
Anatole Tchikine,
Ph.D. University of Dublin
272
Simon Young,
Ph.D. Istituto di Studi Umanistici, Florence
276
Identity and Culture in Italy: a Comparative Approach
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Pierluca Birindelli, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES
The aim of the course is to introduce the concept of culture in the sociological and
anthropological sense. After clarifying the meaning of the word ‘culture’, other related
concepts will be analyzed: values, norms, lifestyles, attitudes, beliefs, stereotypes. Attention
will also be drawn to the notion of social and cultural change (de-secularization,
globalization, mediatization, individualization). Concepts and methods learnt in the first part
of the course will be applied to Italian culture to identify its specific features. The following
dimensions will be looked at in-depth: Erlebnis / Erfahrung (Experience in
German); Expressive / Instrumental; Propensity to consume / Propensity to invest;
Dependence / Responsibility; Passivity / Activity; Particularism / Universalism. Italian-ness
will be compared with traits of the American, Northern European and Mediterranean cultural
heritage. In the framework of cultural processes thus constructed we will then focus on: the
creation of a sense of belonging and the experience of being “different”; self-recognition and
recognition of others (as individuals and as members of a group); the dynamics of interaction
with another person/other people as well as the origins of representations and stereotypes.
Another objective of the course is to take an in-depth look at the concept of individual and
collective identity; within the lifecycle stages particular attention will be given to the passage
from youth to adulthood, depicting a peculiar Italian phenomenon: the prolongation of youth.
As well as learning theoretic propositions and paradigms, students will be invited to undertake
a journey of self–awareness, so as to internalize the themes tackled during the term and apply
them in a critical manner. Part of the course will be set aside for the theme of journey.
Students will thus be able to supplement their studies by learning concepts which will help
them to elaborate what they are experiencing. The basic concepts (theories, paradigms etc.)
adopted – and shared with the students – allow for an interdisciplinary approach, including
Sociology, Cultural Anthropology, and Psychology. The narrative approach will be our
“discipline glue”.
METHOD
The course has a seminar format. Lectures will introduce the main topic, with the support of
slides synthesizing concepts, paradigms, theories and examples extracted from the readings.
Sometimes students will carry out in-class exercises (individually or in groups) and report on
them. Students social and cultural experiences will be used to elaborate concepts raised
throughout the course.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS, PARTICIPATION AND ATTENDANCE
Throughout this course students are expected to engage in active participation by contributing
their thoughts, ideas and questions. Thus, it is crucial to study the required readings and be
ready to share opinions on the topics discussed in class. Course requirements include a
midterm exam, a research paper and a final exam. The research paper (5/10 pages) is about
one of the topics discussed during the course (or linked to them). In this work, students are
expected to make reference to the interpretative concepts and methods of analysis acquired
during the course and to their autobiographical experience, as well as finding (at least) one
newspaper article and one scholar article about the chosen theme. Data and conceptual tools
for the research paper are available on my blog: http://pierluca-birindelli.blogspot.com/.
1
Attendance is mandatory. Unauthorized absences, coming late to class and late papers will
have negative consequences for your final grade
TECHNOLOGY POLICY
Please be advised that laptops are allowed only to take notes during the lecture. You may not
use your computer to surf the Web or for any other personal purpose.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
GRADING
– Class participation: 10%
– Mid-term exam: 30%
– Research paper: 30%
– Final exam: 30%
TEXTBOOK
A course pack will be made available.
READINGS
-
BAUMAN, Z. (1996) From Pilgrim to Tourist — or a Short History of Identity, in S. HALL
and P. DU GAY (eds.) Questions of Cultural Identity. London: Sage, 18-36.
BAUMAN, Z. (2001) Identity in the globalizing world, in “Social Anthropology” 9, 2: 121–
129.
BIRINDELLI, P. (2010) How to do Words with Things, in “Vulgo.Net.”, Multilingual
European Review in Social Science, ISSN: 1213-5518: 1-17.
BIRINDELLI, P. (2011) Playing as Reality: Youngsters Experience in Late Modernity, in
AA.VV. (2011) Youth and the Challenges of the Future. Aracne: Roma, 1-15.
BIRINDELLI, P. (2011) Universal Values: Beyond Cultural Relativism. Notes: 1-9.
CAMPBELL, J. (1949) The Hero With a Thousand Faces. Cleveland: Meridian, Excerpts : 18.
FORGACS, D. and R. LUMELEY (1996) Italian Cultural Studies. New York: Oxford
University Press. Geographies, 9-18; Imagined Italies, 19-33; Images of the South, 72-87.
GEERTZ, C. (1973) The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic. Thick Description:
Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture, 3-30.
GINSBORG, P. (2001) Italy and its Discontents. London: Penguin. Families and
Consumption, 68-93 (class handout).
GRISWOLD, W. (1994) Cultures and Societies in a Changing World. London: Sage. Preface,
xv-xix; Culture and the Cultural Diamond, 1-20.
HAMMERSLEY, M. (2007) Ethnography, in Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. RITZER,
G. (ed). Blackwell Publishing.
LEED, E.J. (1991) The Mind of the Traveller. From Gilgamesh to Global Tourism. New
York: Basic, 1-22.
LUZZI, J. (2002) Italy without Italians: Literary Origins of a Romantic Myth, in “MLN” 117:
48–83.
MILLS, C.W. (1959) The Sociological Imagination. New York: Oxford University Press.
Excerpts: 1-4.
PICKERING, M. (2007) Stereotyping and Stereotypes, in Blackwell Encyclopedia of
Sociology. Ritzer, G. (ed). Blackwell Publishing: 1-5.
RIFKIN, J. (2004) The European Dream. Cambridge: Polity. Introduction, 1-8; The Slow
Death of the American Dream, 11-36; The “United States” of Europe, 197-213; Unity in
Diversity, 267-282; Universalizing the European Dream, 358-385.
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COURSE OUTLINE & SCHEDULE
Week 1: Jan. 16, 18
Introduction to the course: culture, identity and narratives

MILLS, C.W. (1959) The Sociological Imagination. New York: Oxford University
Press. Excerpts: 1-4.

PICKERING, M. (2007) Stereotyping and Stereotypes, in Blackwell Encyclopedia of
Sociology. Ritzer, G. (ed). Blackwell Publishing: 1-5.
Introduction to the research paper
Week 2: Jan. 23, 25
Beyond cultural relativism: multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism and universal values

BIRINDELLI, P. (2011) Universal Values: Beyond Cultural Relativism. Notes: 1-9.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 3: Jan. 30, Feb. 1
Self and other recognition: the experience of travel

LEED, E.J. (1991) The Mind of the Traveller. From Gilgamesh to Global Tourism.
New York: Basic, 1-22.

BAUMAN, Z. (1996) From Pilgrim to Tourist — or a Short History of Identity, in S.
HALL and P. DU GAY (eds.) Questions of Cultural Identity. London: Sage, 18-36.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 4: Feb. 6-8
Cultural objects and cultural diamond

GRISWOLD, W. (1994) Cultures and Societies in a Changing World. London: Sage.
Preface, xv-xix; Culture and the Cultural Diamond, 1-20.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 5: Feb. 13, 15
Culture: toward a useful definition

GEERTZ, C. (1973) The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic. Thick
Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture, 3-30.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 6: Feb. 20, 22
Late modernity and self-identity

BAUMAN, Z. (2001) Identity in the globalizing world, in “Social Anthropology” 9,
2: 121–129.
Review
Week 7: Feb. 29 Mid-term exam
Midterm Break: March 2-11
Week 8: Mar. 12, 14
Youngster cultural experiences abroad

BIRINDELLI, P. (2011) Playing as Reality: Youngsters Experience in Late
Modernity, in AA.VV. (2011) Youth and the Challenges of the Future. Aracne: Roma, 1-15.
Exercise and/or Discussion; Deadline for the choice of the research paper.
Week 9: Mar. 19, 21
Old and new heroes: a mythical way into cultural values
3

CAMPBELL, J. (1949) The Hero With a Thousand Faces. Cleveland: Meridian,
Excerpts : 1-8.

BIRINDELLI, P. (2010) Idols and Heroes of Italian and American Youngsters, Notes
from an ongoing research project: 1-3 (class handout).
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 10: Mar. 26, 28
The European and the Italian Dream

RIFKIN, J. (2004) The European Dream. Cambridge: Polity. Introduction, 1-8; The
Slow Death of the American Dream, 11-36; The “United States” of Europe, 197-213; Unity in
Diversity, 267-282; Universalizing the European Dream, 358-385.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 11: Apr. 2, 4
Italian culture on stage: Italy without Italians

FORGACS, D. and R. LUMELEY (1996) Italian Cultural Studies. New York:
Oxford University Press. Geographies, 9-18; Imagined Italies, 19-33; Images of the South,
72-87.

LUZZI, J. (2002) Italy without Italians: Literary Origins of a Romantic Myth, in
“MLN” 117: 48–83.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 12: Apr. 11
Youth and adulthood: Italy and United States

GINSBORG, P. (2001) Italy and its Discontents. London: Penguin. Families and
Consumption, 68-93 (class handout).

BIRINDELLI, P. (2010) How to do Words with Things, in “Vulgo.Net.”, Multilingual
European Review in Social Science, ISSN: 1213-5518: 1-17.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 13: Apr. 16, 18
The city of Florence: ethnographical observation

HAMMERSLEY, M. (2007) Ethnography, in Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology.
RITZER, G. (ed). Blackwell Publishing.
Exercise and/or Discussion
Week 14: Apr. 23, 25 Research Paper Discussion; Review
Week 15 Apr. 30 Final Paper hand in; Final exam
4
Cultural Literacy Workshops:
Pathways to Intercultural Competence
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Christian Tarchi, Ph.D.
Credits: 1 credit (1.5 hrs weekly over 8 weeks including a 2.5-hour field trip)
Contact hrs/wk: 1.5
Prerequisite: Openness and a desire to both better understand Italian culture and to develop
and apply cross-cultural skills that are essential to becoming a global citizen.
COURSE RATIONALE, DESCRIPTION & GOALS
Cross-cultural communication and understanding as well as harmonious intercultural relations
are becoming increasingly important. It is therefore vital that we hone effective skills to
become global citizens of the world, to understand culture, cultural differences, and the ways
that culture influences the thinking and social behavior of people - and what better
opportunity to do this and put cross-cultural and global citizen skills into practice than while
in Florence! The course will expose you to the values, beliefs, norms and ‘logic’ of Italians
(with a particular focus on Florentines and Florentine people your age), and you shall develop
the skills that it takes to become a global citizen and to be successful in multicultural
environments as well as a deep appreciation of cultural similarities and differences between
the U.S and Italy. It will assist you to challenge your own experiences and (possibly Western)
ideas about what it is to be a person. You will learn about practical ways of applying skills for
success in your life so you can develop intercultural skills as a ‘global citizen’ that will assist
you to understand cross-cultural interactions better, be more effective in them, and get the
most out of them during your time in Florence - and for life!
COURSE FORMAT
Our course will take the form of dynamic, highly interactive weekly 1 hour workshops. Crosscultural theoretical frameworks will be explored using experientially-based activities (e.g. role
plays, Italians guest speakers, small and large group discussions, the sharing of your crosscultural experiences) that make the most of your cross-cultural experience here in Florence,
using Italy and its culture as a kind of ‘experimental classroom’ to facilitate intercultural
awareness and hone your psychological skills for success as a global citizen. You will have
the opportunity to reflect deeply on your growth through oral journals at the beginning of
each class, class discussions, and other means as you experience the Italian culture and
become more aware of changes, both positive and negative, as they occur within you.
Active participation is expected from each student during each seminar. Your questions about
Italian culture, reflections, critical thinking, ideas, and contributions are highly encouraged indeed expected - so please come to class alert, ready to do some serious thinking, and
prepared.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING
Your final grade will be made up of the following:
60% Attendance and participation. Two unexcusable absences will immediately bring your
participation grade to at least a B-. More than 2 will further reduce your participation grade.
Absence due to sickness MUST be accompanied by a doctor’s certificate to be counted as an
‘excusable absence’.
20% Multiple choice and short-answer exam
20% Individual assignments
READER
You will be provided with all the reading material during the course.
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ATTENDANCE
Class session and evening outing attendance is compulsory. Students must speak to/email me
in advance if they have a valid reason for missing a forthcoming class or outing.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
OFFICE HOURS
I am available to respond to student questions after class and am also available for
appointments with students immediately after class. To be fair to all students, I ask that you
make these appointments with me in advance. I can also be contacted by email
([email protected]).
COURSE OUTLINE & ASSESSMENT TASK DUE DATES
Reading(s) for each session must be read (and reflected upon!) before each class.
1. Mon, Jan 16: What is culture? Psychological skills for success as a global citizen in
Italy & other culturally-diverse environments Is what I know to be true about my culture
also true for young Italian culture? ‘Lived-in’ Florence. Exploratory tour of Florentine
sociocultural values. What images and narratives about Italy and Italians influence our initial
perceptions of Italian and Florentine cultural values?
2. Mon, Jan 23: Stereotypes and prejudices.
The forming of stereotypes and prejudices. What role do they play and how can they be
challenged and tested?
3. Mon, Jan 30: Reading “The Psychological Roller-Coaster of Cultural Transitions”.
Discussion of the Reading.
4. Mon, Feb 6: ‘La bella figura’.
The Italian philosophy of la bella figura (literally, the beautiful figure), a way of life based on
beauty, good image, aesthetics and proper behavior.
5. Mon, Feb 13: Reading “Successful Communication in Multicultural Environments”.
Discussion of the Reading.
6. Mon, Feb 20: Journal Keeping
Keeping track of our experience through different modalities.
February 27-March 1: Mid-term Examinations
March 2-11: Midterm Break
7. Mon, Mar 12: Entertainment in Italy.
What movies and shows do Italian listen to? What newspapers and magazines do they read?
What music do they listen to? Understanding Italian culture by exploring what they consider
entertaining.
8. Mon, Mar 19: Culture shock & reverse culture shock. Global citizen goals for rest of
semester – and life. Culture shock curves and theories. Students to reflect on their present
sojourn in Italy. How can one manage culture shock?
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9. Mon, Mar 26: Viewing of a quintessential Italian film for analysis from a cultural
perspective.
10. Mon, Apr 02: Fashion values & norms.
Shopping for cultural values: understanding a culture from shops and grocery stores settings.
11. Mon, Apr 16: Night-out. Having an aperi-cena and interacting with Italians.
12. Mon, Apr 23: Taking stock of our experience.
‘How I have changed’. Reflect on and share with class what you’ve gained and learnt from
your cross-cultural experiences over the semester PLUS write a Student Profile potentially for
the institute’s website including ‘Currently what I am doing here’, ‘Most Memorable
Experience at Palazzo Rucellai’, ‘Advice for Future Students’ (see Prospective Students page
on website).
NB: This syllabus is subject to change at any time according to circumstances.
7
Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Carlo Achilli, M.Sc., Licensed Architect
Contact hrs/wk: 9
Prerequisites: Arch. Design studio Core I-IV
Course Type: Design Studio
Site-visits fee: $230
Credits: 5
Office Hours by appointment.
Teaching Assistants: Arch. Daniela Sinicropi, Arch. Pier Paolo Rapanà
The Shaping of Urban Spaces: Castiglione della Pescaia
Theory-aided urban design for change to an historic neighborhood and an waterfront renewal
INTRO
“Cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their
discourse is secret, their rules absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and
everything conceals something else.” “I have no desires nor fears,” the Khan
declared,” and my dreams are composed either by my mind or by chance”.
“Cities also believe they are the work of the mind or of chance, but neither
the one nor the other suffices to hold up their walls. You take a delight not in
a city’s seven or seventy wonders, but in the answer it gives to a question of
yours.” “Or the question it asks you, forcing you to answer, like Thebes
through the mouth of the Sphinx.”1
The aim of the first weeks is to introduce students to the cultural experience of living in a city
whose layers date back centuries, which at the same time houses contemporary life for its
citizens and visitors. The exercises are designed to acquaint the students with the city of
Florence, by helping you in reading the urban fabric, along with mapping the city in order to
facilitate your understanding of such a different environment from the one you are
accustomed.
CONTEXT
"The city, however, does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a
hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the
banisters of the steps, the antennae of the lighting rods, the poles of its flags,
every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls."2
As architectural educators, we share the conviction that architecture should account for its
place - its belonging in the contextual setting. Hence our attention will be directed to
addressing the myriad issues of place and context in which architectural projects can be
situated. The goal is to equip students with the necessary tools to describe, represent, analyze
and interpolate the urban fabric. To this end attention is focused on the issues of context by
means of initial intensive exercises in site analysis and documentation. Florence is a city
whose layers are deposited throughout the centuries therefore a particular emphasis is placed
upon the understanding of the urban context of the city, both in present and historical terms.
This directive fosters the development of a comprehensive urban perspective.
1
2
Italo Calvino, Le Città Invisibili, 1972. “Invisible Cities” translated from the Italian by William Weaver
ibid.
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URBAN DESIGN
The aim of the studio, is to bring together three modes of inquiry that are often considered
separately: a theory-based approach, the consideration of historical urban environment - their
meaning and use for today, and a design problem. Articles will be handed out periodically.
The first part of the semester will be dedicated to understanding design issues at the urban
scale, where the interrelation between elements of a city can be better understood. Public
spaces such as piazzas, public buildings and stores play a key role in the civic life of the
historic neighborhoods. The studio will explore the rehabilitation of such important elements
through a culturally sensitive design effort.
The site project in the historic town of Castiglione della Pescaia, in Tuscany, will encompass
both urban and landscape analysis of the present situation and a proposal of recovery plan for
public spaces. This exercise is concerned with streets, piazzas, access to the beach, setbacks
and all the elements which come together to form the “public face of Architecture”.
The second design assignment will be an infill project located in infill area between the
Historic center of Castiglione della Pescaia and the waterfront . The program is mixed use and
includes commercial/civic facilities on the ground floor and housing on the above stories. The
study of residential typologies entails an understanding of Italian cultural setting and more
specifically of Tuscan way of dwelling.
Your design will explore both the building typology and the layering of the surrounding
fabric, providing a contextual response appropriate to the setback of the Piazza.
Both designs will address the dichotomy public - private space keeping in mind that the task
of the architect is to provide the community with livable places of interaction as well as to
respond to the individuals' needs for a place of their own.
REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING
The final grade will reflect both process and product.
Students are expected to keep a journal of drawings and observations. There will be short,
intense design exercises, readings, discussions and presentations, and interrelated design
projects at different scales.
Students are expected to attend studio every day. More than two absences will affect your
grade.
Roger Williams University does not permit "Incomplete" grades to be granted for classes
taken during a semester abroad.
Studio work grades will be weighted as follows:
- Journal, Urban analysis and studies 10%
- Readings, discussion and class participation 10%
- Public Space design 30%
- Sketching 10%
- Infill design project 40 %
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are
expected to develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the
school occupies and they are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
READINGS and Recommended Sources
Textbooks:
 Kevin Lynch, “The Image of the City" ,Cambridge, MA: The Technology Press and
Harvard University Press, 1960
Articles to be discussed in class:

Gehl, J., “Three Type of Outdoor Activities”. In Life between buildings: using public space,
Hodkinson P.: Danish Architectural Press 2004, pp. 11-32
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
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Gehl, J., “Life between buildings – in Current Social Situations”. In Life between buildings: using
public space, Hodkinson P.: Danish Architectural Press 2004, pp. 33-53
Caniggia G., Maffei G.L., "Buildings as individuations of building types”. In Interpreting basic
building - Architectural composition and building typology, Florence: Alinea Editrice 2001, pp.75117
Kropf K.S., “Typological Zoning”. In Typological Process and Design Theory, Petruccioli A.,
Cambridge, MA: Aga Khan program for Islamic Architecture 1998, pp. 127-140
Scheer B.C., Scheer D.R., “Typology and Urban Design Guidelines”. In Rethinking XIXth
Century City, Petruccioli A., Cambridge, MA: Aga Khan program for Islamic Architecture 1998,
pp. 151-164
Strickland R., “Between Party Walls: XIXth Century New York Residential Architecture and
Urbanism”. In Rethinking XIXth Century City, Petruccioli A., Cambridge, MA: Aga Khan program
for Islamic Architecture 1998, pp. 65-80
De Monchaux J., “The Role of the Architect”. In The Architecture of Housing. Powell R.,
Singapore: Concept media, The Aga Khan Award for Architecture 1990, pp. 216-224
Khan, H.U. and Moore C., “The Architecture of Housing. In The Architecture of Housing. Powell
R., Singapore: Concept media, The Aga Khan Award for Architecture 1990, pp. 166-183
Italian Architecture
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Fei, S., Florence: an outline of urban history, Firenze: Alinea, 1995
Naldini, M., La Piazza, la Loggia, il Palazzo Rucellai, Firenze: Edizioni Medicea, 1989
Zucconi, G., Florence: an architectural guide, Venice: Arsenale Editrice, 1995
Wittkower R., Art and Architecture in Italy, 1600-1750, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972
Tafuri, M., History of Italian Architecture, 1944-1985, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1989
Los, S., Carlo Scarpa, Cologne: Taschen, 1994
Library and Magazines
The studio has subscriptions to Domus, Abitare, Architecture Review and And a small
collection of architecture books. You are encouraged to use
 Architecture Library of the Università di Firenze, which has a collection of 60000 books
and 500 periodicals:
Via Pier Antonio Micheli 2 - 50121 Firenze. Tel. 055 5047015/5048982
Opening hours: Mon - Fri 8:30-19:00; Sat 8:30-13:00
On -line catalogue: http://opac.unifi.it/
Photo-library
 Fratelli Alinari Museum of the History of Photography and Archives
http://business.alinari.it/login/index.asp Login: rwuarch
Password: florence
Architecture Exhibitions
The following web sites are excellent sources for architecture and industrial design exhibits:
 http://www.triennale.it/triennale/eng/index.html
 http://www.edidomus.it/Domus/magazine/avviosommario.cfm
 http://www.news.archiworld.it/main3-3-1.htm
SCHEDULE: January 17 – May 03, 2012
Assignments will be handed out on the dates indicated below.
Site walks, meetings, or desk-crits on days not allocated to specific items
The schedule & outline are subject to change.
WEEK 1
THE CITY
Perception
Jan. 17, 19
Introduction to the studio + Lecture + Site visit + Reading Discussion
+ Teams Checklist
Perceived Space: Form | Identity | Meaning
10
Lecture: Tradition in the Modernity _History Repeating
Reading 1: Lynch K. “The Image of the Environment” The Image of
the City, pp. 1-45
Site Visit: San Miniato & the city walls
Reading Discussion: Lynch book
Due Jan. 24th
Assignment 1: Perceived Space: the historical city
WEEK 2
THE NEIGHBOURHOOD Pin-Up Assnmt. 1 + Lecture + Site Visit + Sketching
Description & Analysis
Jan. 24, 26
Representation of urban spaces and comments on their perception
Lecture: Urban Transformation
Reading 2: Lynch K, “The Image of the Environment,”The Image of
the City, pp.46- 75
Reading 3: Gehl J., “Three Type of Outdoor Activities”. Life between
buildings: public space, pp. 11-32
Site Visit: Sant’ Ambrogio area, Le Murate complex: an successful
urban renewal
Due Sept. 31st
WEEK 3
THE PIAZZA
Analysis
Jan. 31, Feb. 2
Due Feb. 7th
WEEK 4
THE SITE
Urban Strategy
Feb. 7, 9, 10
10
Assignment 2: Urban Fabric: Description & Analysis, Sant’
Ambrogio Area
Pin-Up Assnmt. 2 + Lecture + Site Visit + Sketching +
Massive Model
Contextual Analysis |The Urban Fabric & typologies of Public Space
Lecture: Fare Piazza
Reading 4: Gehl, J., “Life between buildings – in Current Social
Situations”, Life between buildings: using public space, pp. 33-53
Site Visit: San Niccolò, an historic Florentine district its Piazza and
its waterfront
Assignment 3: Urban site: Analysis of Florentine Piazzas
Pin-Up Assnmt. 3 + Reading Discussion Lynch & Gehl + Field Trip
Existing vs proposed plan: uses, scale of streets/blocks/open spaces
Guest Lecture: Introduction to Urban Design Requirements for
Castiglione della Pescaia by Arch. Paolo Di Nardo
Reading 5: Waldheim C., The Landscape Urbanism Reader
hand out article
CASTIGLIONE DELLA PESCAIA FIELD TRIP
by bus from SMN_TS Friday 10/02 @ 8.30 am following program
and schedule
Due Feb. 14th
Assignment 4: Master Plan for Castiglione della Pescaia
WEEK 5
THE SITE
Urban Guidelines
Feb. 14, 16
Pin-Up Assnmt. 4 + Desk-Crit + Lecture + Discussions + Massive
Model
Public Space Design: Re-thinking the site
11
Lecture: Urban Transformation in Florence_ examples and discussions
Reading 6: from Architectural Record mag.ne 06/2009 “The utilitarian
Docks de Paris makes a fashion statement” by Aric Chen |Pdf format
Site Visit: The City of Music of Florence |Construction Site Visit
Due Feb. 21
Assignment 5: Model for Castiglione della Pescaia scale 1:200
WEEK 6
THE SITE
Massive Model + Desk-Crit Assnmt. 5 scale 1:500 – 1:200 all week
Public Space Design _Studio open 24h
Feb. 21, 23
Castiglione della Pescaia: public vs private functions and open spaces
Lecture: The Contemporary in the historic urban context
Case studies: urban renewal in Rome, Berlin, Paris and Athens.
Scrapping and Bldg trading with government’s incentives.
Reading 7: Kropf K.S.,Typological Zoning inTypological Process and
Design Theory pp. 127-140 & Scheer B.C., Typology and Urban
Design Guidelines, pp. 151-164
WEEK 7
THE SITE
Design Review
Feb. 28, March 1
WEEK 8
March 2-11
WEEK 9
THE SITE
Design Guidelines
March 13, 15
Due April 24th
WEEK 10
THE SITE CdP
Infill Project
March 20, 22
WEEK 11
THE SITE CdP
Infill Project
MID-TERM EXTERNAL REVIEW – March 1st
Jury: Arch. Silvia Catitti|Arch. Angela Germano|Arch. Paolo Di
Nardo|Arch. Franco Pisani
SEMESTER BREAK
Desk-Crit Re-thinking your public space proposal + Guest Lecture
Urban Guidelines: block types and relationship with environmental
impact
Guest Lecture: Fanello, the new district: an Urban and Architectural
intervention
Case study: Practical and professional experience from in a new
construction site by Arch. Paola Achilli and Ing. Paolo Benucci
Reading
8:Article
on
Fanello
Presentation
hand out article
Assignment 6: Final Requirements
Discussion + Desk-Crit Assnmt. 6 + Guest Lecture
Architectural Guidelines: building types
Guest Lecture: Landscaping urban design as sustainable design
promoter by Arch. Giannantonio Vannetti
Reading 9: Articles and Topics will be proposed for individual
researches |Pdf format
Pin-Up individual research + Desk-Crit Assnmt. 6 - scale 1:500 +
Guest Lecture
12
March 27, 29
Mixed-use building: Schematic design, Plan and
massing model (1:200)
Lecture: Rome: EUR & the foro Italico
Reading 9: Article on Sustainable Design in Italy |Pdf format
30
WEEK 12
THE SITE CdP
Infill Project
April 3, 5
WEEK 13
THE SITE CdP
Infill Project
April 10, 12
WEEK 14
THE SITE CdP
Infill Project
April 17, 19
WEEK 15
FINAL REVIEW
Presentation
April 24, 26
24
WEEK 16
FINALS WEEK
Debriefing
May 1, 3
ROME FIELD TRIP
Desk-Crit + Lecture
Mixed-use building: Plan, Section and Elevation (1:200)
Lecture: Sustainable Design in Italy, the experience of Mario
Cucinella as a lens
Reading 10: Article on Sustainable Design in Italy |Pdf format
Desk-Crit Assnmt. 6 + Model scale 1:200
Re-thinking Public vs Private Spaces in your design proposal 1:200
Lecture: Shanghai EXPO 2010 vs Milan EXPO 2015: two different
topics and approaches
Reading 11: Abitare mag.ne 06/2010 A “Planetary Garden for
Expo”|Pdf format
Desk-Crit Assnmt. 6 + Model scale 1:200
Mixed-use building: Detailed design, materials + color palette,
model
FINAL EXTERNAL REVIEW April 24th
CASTIGLIONE DELLA PESCAIA : Urban Design Proposal
for the rehabilitation of an crucial part of the town
Final presentation at CdP Redevelopment Authority with the Mayor
and the local community
CASTIGLIONE DELLA PESCAIA FIELD TRIP
Recording Projects and Studio Clean Up
13
Architecture Design Studio
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Franco Pisani, Licensed Architect
Contact hrs/wk: 9
Prerequisites: Arch 310 or equivalent
Course Type: Design Studio
Site-visits fee: $230
Credits: 5
Office Hours by appointment.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This Design studio regards the designer as a thinker as well as a maker, working
conceptually and strategically across the fading boundaries of traditional design disciplines.
A continuation of ARCH 310, with an emphasis on the roles of space, context, structures and
section in buildings. The studio will focus on two design goals: Integrating context and
buildings and balancing the needs of the individual with community through projects of
residential architecture. More urgently than ever, today’s world needs innovative, informed
design, and architects are needed for more complex and interactive profiles. This course
intends to define and nurture the emerging roles and methods of design.
GOALS/OBJECTIVES OF COURSE
CONTEXT CONTEXT CONTEXT
The main opportunity offered by a design studio in Firenze, is that of working in a strongly
characterized historical context, with its multiple layers and its continuous in progress status.
Firenze and its built environment will be the text book for studio, and the studio will develop
methods to learn from it. Students will be asked to go behind appearances, and to look at the
city from different points of view and not as tourists.
ARCHITECTURE IS STRATEGY AND COMMUNICATION.
The main goal of the studio is to provide students with an insight into the nature of the public
domain and the ways in which architecture and urban space are woven to create the physical
setting for the activities and rituals of public urban life.
STYLE IS NOT AN ADDED QUALITY
The studio will not focus only on a merely functional program . Instead, it will operate on the
premise that public spaces are important to the livability of a city. Students will cultivate
design not to explore style, but to explore what they consider to be fundamental to
architecture: namely, issues of space, urbanism and meanings, searching a way to hide
thoughts inside shapes.
ORDINARY vs EXTRAORDINARY
Unorthodox programs using contemporary complexity of urban phenomena will be of main
importance in developing design proposals.
PROJECTS AND/OR ASSIGNMENTS
Students will be assigned a project site in Firenze, in which they will be asked to design a
building and its surrounding public open space. The aim is to give students the opportunity to
develop a design with a contemporary approach and sensibility in a highly defined historical
context. Through a series of steps this studio will explore a variety of issues relevant to
contemporary problems of architectural design within the constraints (and taking advantage of
the opportunities) of an historical context. Details, briefs and programs will be presented in
class during the first week.
14
Design Steps:
_intro and site surveys
_the drift
_concept and urban strategies
_mid term review
_design phase
_presentation boards
_final jury
week1
week2-4
week
week7
week9-13
week15
week16
Assignments:
_Personal profile: pdf format
_The drift: discovering and mapping the site
_Mid term review: pecha kutcha presentation with concept, urban strategies, massing, views.
Model 1:200
_Final boards: two competition style A0 boards (portrait orientation) anonymous. Model
1:100.
_Final booklet: A3 format (landscape orientation).
Technical projects: 1:100 scale (plans, sections, elevations)
One section+plan+elevation 1:20
Views, perspectives and photomontages.
Text and presentation.
Picture of the model.
Communicating ideas clearly, and documenting work effectively is a crucial part of the design
process and of the professional life of an architect. As part of an effort to record your work for
the future all students will be REQUIRED to create effective and graphically well-designed
presentation.
Suggestions for a good semester:
Make sure the presentation of your design ideas is complete, convincing and professional.
Start working as soon as possible: ten minutes a day produce better projects than a two
sleepless day session close to deadlines.
Work within the time constraints to maximize the expression of your ideas.
Make sure that your products represent all of your ideas, without too much repetition, without
needing to embellish too much with words.
Make sure each drawing or model says something distinct and important. If it's superfluous,
leave it out.
Make sure your verbal presentation is SHORT and to the point.
Make sure to outline your main points in advance.
Be efficient, learn to develop good time-management skills.
You are expected to participate actively in all discussions and pin-ups.
Unsupervised time during desk crits should be highly productive and self-motivated.
REQUIREMENTS OF COURSE
The studio is organized around the development of the various steps of the design process.
Pin-ups, presentation of research outcomes and general reviews will be scheduled week by
week, in order to let every design have at least one general deep review a week. A spot,
usually on Thursdays, will be left for in class discussion of programs for the week and of
topics presented in reader articles.
DRAWINGS WILL BE INSTRUMENTS TO UNDERSTAND AND COMMUNICATE
ARCHITECTONIC THOUGHTS.
Students will be asked to present in-progress and final design using different media and tools:
drawings pin-up, presentations, movies, boards, papers.
15
Attendance is mandatory .You are required to attend every class. If you cannot make it to
class, always notify your instructor in advance. Two missed classes will lower the final grade,
more than three un-excused absences can result in automatic failure of the course.
Chronic tardiness (3 times) will be considered one absence. Lateness, excessive coming-andgoing, and leaving early are disruptive, disrespectful, and unacceptable.
Active and responsible participation is an important component of student work.
Class communication: Email will be the official outside-of-class means of communication for
this course. It is the student’s responsibility to daily check the Marywood University email
account she/he has been provided for any updates to course information
COURSE GOALS
1) to continue the student’s development of architectural design investigation and
communication skills ( NAAB SPC A.1, A.2, A.3, A.6, A.7)
2) to encourage an iterative design process (NAAB SPC A.2, A.5, A.6)
3) to document and analyze the forces and systems that are specific to a site or location and
introduce the impact of these forces on Pre-Design (NAAB SPC A.2, A.5, A.11, B.1)
5) to investigate the interaction between landscape and architecture to find ways to optimize
and conserve natural resources (NAAB SPC A.6, B.3)
6) to develop designs that balance the needs of the individual the community (NAAB SPC
A.6)
7) to understand the requirements for life safety and egress (NAAB SPC B.5)
8) to work corroboratively to successfully complete design projects (NAAB SPC C.1)
9) to design spaces that meet or exceed Accessibility standards ( NAAB SPC B.2)
10) to design spaces that optimize natural resources and understand how the choice of
materials impacts the environment (NAAB SPC B.3)
OUTCOMES
Students will
1) complete site analysis and pre-design in which they research local zoning
requirements.
2) create a masterplan that integrates the building with the publicspace.
3) develop a preliminary structural diagram for their design.
4) create an ADA accessible residential unit.
5) create spaces that meet life safety egress requirements.
6) create presentation drawings.
7) create a portfolio.
ASSESSMENT
Each of the following will be evaluated relative to the goals of the course, expectations of the
instructor, standards set by previous and current students in this course, and the individual
student’s overall growth from one project to the next. Students will be assessed based upon:
• Craft and technical proficiency
• Design process development and inquiry
• Design concept and/or project intent development
• Overall quality and completeness of assignments
• Design cohesion and clarity
The submissions for evaluation will be one of the following based on the assignment:
• Presentations of drawings, digital images, and models
SUBMISSION POLICY
All work is expected to be submitted at the beginning of class on the assigned date. Late work
will be penalized up to half of a letter grade per day late. Work that is more than one week
late will not be graded, and will count as a 0. Any incomplete work submitted will be graded
at its current state with the understanding that future completion of the work will not effect
16
the assignment’s grade. Since many of the projects have multiple phases and each phase
builds on of the previous, completion of all assignments is expected. Absence from class is
not an acceptable excuse for a failure to submit an assignment on time. Please make
arrangements to deliver it to the instructor on or before the due date. Even for days in which
no specific work is due, substantiative, evident development of the current project is expected
EVALUATION CRITERIA
Assignments must be completed on time. Late submissions will not
design class and the quality of your work is of great importance.
calculated according to the following schedule:
Personal profile
Participation, discussion and readings
The drift
Mid term presentation
Final jury (boards)
Final booklet
be graded. This is a
Final grades will be
5%
10%
20%
20%
20%
25%
GRADING METHOD
A - excellent, enlightened invention. Superlative or exemplary work, initiative beyond the
description of the problem. Significant understanding of the problem. Conceptual clarity.
Attended by an attitude of self-motivated exploration, open-mindedness, and a willingness to
benefit from criticism.
B - good, convincing development and comprehensive resolution. Very good, some
exemplary work, a thorough understanding of the problem. Project displays conceptual
foundation, well crafted. Competence and mastery of skills. Open, inquisitive attitude.
C – fair or average performance. Work below the expected standard, which meets the
minimum requirements of the problem and course. Shows understanding of the problem, with
some deficiencies. .
D – poor (unsatisfactory but passing) performance. Work which demonstrates deficient
skills and does not show an understanding of the problem or expectations. Work often
attended with closed-minded attitude with respect to criticism and self-motivation. Although
technically passing, this work is unacceptable in a professional program.
R - repeat. Work which is unsatisfactory, which does not meet the requirements of the
problem or
course, and shows a serious deficiency in skills or is incomplete. Raises questions with
respect to the future success within the program.
F – failure
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
A reader with selected articles will be given during the first week of studio.
Every class day books and suggested readings will implement the bibliography.
_Jane Jackobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities New York: Random House,
1961
_Rainer Banham, Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment ,1969
_Aurora Fernández Per, Javier Mozas, Javier Arpa, Dbook. Density, Data, Diagrams,
Dwellings, a+t, 2007.
_Rem Koolhaas, Delirious New York, Thames and Hudson, 1978 (ed. it., Electa, 2001).
_Bernard Tschumi, Architecture and Disjunction, Mit Press, 1994 (ed. it., Pendragon, 2005).
_Jeffrey Kipnis, Perfect acts of architecture, Moma, 2001.
17
_Manuel Gausa, Vicente Guallart, Willy Müller, Federico Soriano, José Morales, Fernando
Porras, The Metapolis Dictionary of Advanced Architecture. City, Technology and Society in
the Information Age, a cura di Susanna Cros, Actar, 2003 (2000).
_Federico Soriano, Sin_thesis, Gustavo Gili, 2004.
SCHEDULE
week day
1
3
presentation: the drift
site survey
thu jan 26
2:30pm_desk crits
5:30pm_class discussion
fri
8:00am>8:00pm_field trip:
pienza|sanquirico|montalcino
jan 27
2:30pm_on site: santo spirito
the drift
4:00pm_pin up
lecture: the parasitic
tue feb 7 approach in reusing the city
4:00pm_desk crits
Sara Marini.
Parasite
Architecture.
Recycling strategies
for the contemporary
city.
2:30pm_desk crits
5:30pm_class discussion
lecture: arnolfo and the
tue feb 14 reconstruction years
4:00pm_desk crits
2:30pm_on site: via
thu feb 16 guicciardini
4:00pm_pin up
6
Ernesto Nathan
Rogers:
The problem of
building within an
existing environment
lecture:brunelleschi and
tue jan 31 alberti: two ways
4:00pm_desk crits
thu feb 9
5
readings
2:30pm lecture: the city as a
tue jan 24 neverending process
personal profile
4:00pm_desk crits
thu feb 2
4
due
intro: studio presentation
lecture: 20 good reasons for
tue jan 17
a semester abroad
homework: personal profile
thu jan 19
2
topic
massing+manifesto
lecture: architecture as
tue feb 21 performance
4:00pm_desk crits
18
thu feb 23
7
2:30pm_desk crits
5:30pm_class discussion
David
Leatherbarrow.
Architecture's
unscripted
performance
model 1:200
2:30pm_on site: santa maria
the drift
tue feb 28 novella
concept diagrams
4:00pm_desk crits
1:200 drawings
mid term presentations
thu mar 1 20x20=6'40” pecha kutcha
presentations
8
9
10
11
MID TERM BREAK
lecture: sorgane public
tue mar 13 housing complex
4:00pm_desk crits
thu mar 15
2:30pm>7:00pm_bike field
trip: est florence and sorgane
tue mar 20
lecture: what makes a home
4:00pm_desk crits
thu mar 22
2:30pm_desk crits
5:30pm_class discussion
Orhan Pamuk:
Why didn't I become
an architect?
Italo Cavino.
Lightness and
Appropriateness.
from American
lectures
lecture: architecture as a
tue mar 27 narrative
4:00pm_desk crits
2:30pm_on site: santa croce
and cappella pazzi
thu mar 29
in-progress
4:00pm_pin up
fri
12
13
mar 30
8:00am>8:00pm_field trip:
genova
lecture: hybrid, dense and
tue apr 3 different: city models
4:00pm_desk crits
thu apr 5
2:30pm_desk crits
5:30pm_class discussion
tue apr 10
lecture: frk recent works
4:00pm_desk crits
thu apr 12 2:30pm_desk crits
Zygmunt Bauman
Mixophilia vs.
mixophobia, or the
attitudinal antinomy
of city life
Gilles Clement.
19
5:30pm_class discussion
fri
Three concepts
Michael Braungart.
Is sustainability
boring?
apr 13 8:00am>_field trip: vicenza
sat apr 14 field trip: verona
sun apr 15 >8:00pm_field trip: mantova
14
lecture: g. michelucci: 100
tue apr 17 years of architecture
4:00pm_desk crits
2:30pm>7:00pm_bike field
thu apr 19 trip: west florence and the
highway church
15
16
tue apr 24
lecture: bodies in space
4:00pm_desk crits
thu apr 26
2:30pm_Final Jury for
design proposals
boards and model
tue may 1 national holiday: no class
booklet
2:30pm_feedback, debrief
thu may 3 and collection of materials
pdf copies
20
Interior Architecture Studio
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Carlo Achilli, Licensed Architect
Contact hrs/wk: 9
Prerequisites: IArch 310
Course Type: Design Studio
Site-visits fee: $200
Credits: 5
Office Hours by appointment.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The objective of this studio is to focus conceptually and analytically on the manipulation of
interior space using a contemporary program in a historical context.
The course will examine historically significant buildings as existing space that will be
adapted for contemporary use. Selected readings, class discussion, lectures and guest lectures,
assignments and field trips will form the body of the work of the course. In addition, several
site visits will be arranged with local interior architecture firms and designers.
COURSE GOAL, FORMAT AND COURSEWORK
The aim of the course is to expose students to emerging issues affecting interior architecture
(goal 1), to present innovative technologies in sustainable interiors preserving existing
historical structure (goal 2), to provide an in-depth understanding of the changing materiality
in contemporary interiors (goal 3), to provide opportunities for developing knowledge of
Italian interior design culture (goal 4), to expose students to a variety of non-conventional
business, organizational and familial structures (goal 5), to develop strategies toward
contemporary design challenges facing the profession (goal 6).
The course combines slide lectures with numerous site visits to contemporary spaces made in
Florence, a one day field trip to Prato, city of fabric manufacturing and two days field trip to
Milan during the Salone del Mobile, the largest international fair in Europe about interior
architecture. Students must complete three different main assignments regarding the
residential, retail and hotel design. Participation include some brief, informal, oral
presentations. The participation grade also reflects in-class discussion, which is based on the
reading assignment and desk-crits.
OUTCOMES
▪ students will explore a variety of critical, aesthetic and practical issues relevant to
contemporary interior architecture through readings, lectures, and discussions (goal 1)
▪ students will refine their critical thinking and practical design problem solving abilities (goal
1)
▪ students will identify emerging technologies in sustainable design (goal 2)
▪ students will participate in site visits to manufacturing facilities producing sustainable and
local materials (goal 2|4)
▪ students will gain knowledge of materials through research and experimentation with mixed
media and building materials and products (goal 3)
▪ students will be exposed to a range of “non- traditional” complex design issues and their
future implications (goal 5)
▪ students will collaborate in groups and conduct research on a current topics of interest and
are responsible for preparing project and presentation as a focal point for critiques and
discussion (goal 5)
21
▪ students will engage in professional experiences with local interior architecture firms as well
as with visiting professors and designers (goal 6)
ASSESSMENT
▪ Class presentations will be required on relevant topics
▪ Interpretive design sketches and models will be produced
▪ The invention of new sustainable materials will be explored through the use of mixed media
▪ Class discussion will be required and evaluated
▪ Paper assignments will be required to assess students’ level of understanding of breadth and
depth of subject
ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADES
There will be three main assignments during the semester and some brief, informal, oral
presentations about individual researches. To assess the progress of students, each assignment
will increase in substance.
The final grade will reflect both process and product.
Students are expected to keep a journal of drawings and observations. There will be short,
intense design exercises, readings, discussions and presentations, and interrelated design
projects at different scales.
Studio work grades will be weighted as follows:
▪ Journal, interior architecture analysis and studies 10%
▪ Readings, discussion and class participation 10%
▪ Sketching 10%
▪ Midterm Review 30%
▪ Final examination 40 %
N.B. There is no “C – ” grade in this course.
ATTENDANCE POLICY – CLASS PARTICIPATION
Attendance is expected in all classes. Lateness and unexcused absenteeism will lower your
grade. Attendance is mandatory and more than two absences will have a substantial impact on
it.
Class participation is absolute necessary. The various on site visits and field trips provide the
opportunity to involve the student directly in work analysis. In details:
▪ Punctuality is crucial for the entirety of this course. When class meets at a building,
architectural firms or construction site, make sure you know how to get there. If you’re not
sure set off early in case you get lost.
▪ Examinations and pin up sections will not be rescheduled for any reasons.
▪ Friends or relatives are strictly not permitted to attend class or any of our visits.
▪ No eating during class time.
▪ No telephone calls during class time (including lectures on site visits)
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are
expected to develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the
school occupies and they are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
READING AND RECOMMENDED SOURCES
▪ Emilio Ambasz, Italy: The New Domestic Landscape: Achievements and problem of Italian
Design, Centro Di, Firenze 1972
▪ Karl Mang, History of modern furniture, Academy editions, London 1979
▪ Nina Bornsen-Holtmann, Italian Design, Taschen, Koln 1994
▪ S. Los, Carlo Scarpa, Taschen, Cologne 1994
▪ Cristina Morozzi, Silvio San Pietro, Mobili italiani contemporanei, L’Archivolto,Milano 1996
▪ Franco Mirenzi, Marco Zanuso Design dei tempi moderni, Arflex, Milano 1997
▪ Andrea Branzi, Il design italiano 1964-2000, Electa, Milano
22
▪ G. Caniggia, G. Maffei, Architectural composition and building typology – Interpreting basic
building, Firenze: Alinea, 2001.
▪ Almerigo De Angeli, Design: the Italian way, Modo, Milano 2001
▪ Norman Potter, Cos’è il design? (what is a designer), Cadice edizioni, 2002
▪ Giampiero Bosoni, Guy Cogeval, Il Modo italiano: Italian Design and Avant-garde in the 20th
Century, Skira,Milano 2006
▪ Giampiero Bosoni, Il mondo italiano, Skira, Toronto 2007
▪ Franca Gualtieri, A trip through Italian design, Mantova 2007
▪ Susan Yelavich, Contemporary World Interiors, Phaidon June 2007
▪ Giampiero Bosoni, Italian Design, Moma design series, Milano 2008
▪ Andrea Branzi, Silvia Annichiarico, Che cosa è il design italiano? Le sette ossessioni del design
italiano,Electa,Milano 2009
▪ Luigi Settembrini, 500 years of Italian forniture, Skira, Milano 2009
▪ Deyan Sudjic, The language of things, W.W. Norton and Company, N.W. 2009
Articles will be assigned and discuss in class from the following magazines:
▪ C. Achilli, Interior architecture and restyling: the Hotel Palazzo Piccolomini, Architectural Digest
n°313, June|2007, pg.185-187
▪ C. Pearson, Design vanguard, Architectural Record n°12, Dec|2007, pg.67-119
▪ B. Sterling, The new materialism, Abitare n°482, May|2008, pg.138-145
▪ A. Santos, Fedding Milan, Code n°2, Feb|2008, pg.40-49
▪ F. Stignani Architectural wisdom, Code n°2, Feb|2008, pg.50-65
▪ G. Gerosa Harmony of contrasts, Code n°2, Feb|2008 , pg.86-92
▪ L. Luperi, Minimal baroque, And n°13, Sept-Dec|2008, pg.46-49
▪ E. Bedarida, Claudio Nardi, riva loft, And n°13, Sept-Dec |2008, pg.50-53
▪ C. Achilli, Advanced design studio, And n°13, Sept-Dec |2008, pg.54-57
▪ E. Valacchi, Elio Di Franco “alle murate”, And n°13, Sept-Dec |2008, pg.42-45
▪ S. Yelavich, Paolo Zermani inside the mask, Firenze Architettura, n°2|2009, pg.12-19
▪ A. Tagliapietra, Mask and idea, Firenze Architettura, n°2|2009, pg.52-61
▪ L. Malfona, Punta della dogana contemporary art center, Venice, l’ Industria delle Costruzioni
n°411, Gen-Feb|2010, pg.88-97
▪ F. Rosetti, Designing and product companies, And n°17, Gen-April|2010, pg.86-95
▪ M. Pizzi, Environment: organic contemporary furniture, Abitare n° 506, Oct|2010, pg. 130-147
▪ P. Rapanà, Naturale/Artificiale, And n°19, Dec|2010, pg.140-145
▪ P. Di Nardo, Design Michele De Lucchi, Disenchantment of light, And n°20, Gen-April|2011,
pg.109-115
▪ S. Stephens, Design and time, Architectural Record, n°4|2011, pg.53-99
▪ J. Olivares, The size of memory, Domus n° 951, Oct|2011, pg. 94
Library
▪ Public Architecture Library of the Università di Firenze, which has collection of 60000 books and 500
periodicals: Via Pier Antonio Micheli 2 - 50121 Florence. Tel.+39 55 5047015/5048982
Opening hours: Mon - Fri 8:30 am -7:00 pm; Sat 8:30-13:00 On -line catalogue: http://opac.unifi.it/
▪ Small but selected Architecture Library at Palazzo Bargagli: Interior Architecture Studio,
29 Corso dei Tintori, 50122 Florence, opening hours: Mon - Fri 9:00 am - 7:30pm. The studio has
subscriptions to Domus, Abitare, Architecture Review, Architectural Record, Firenze Architettura,
L’industria delle costruzioni, and And magazine more a small collection of books: Urban planning,
Architecture and Interior Architecture
COURSE TIMETABLE: January 16 – May 03, 2012
Assignments will be handed out on the dates indicated below.
Site visits, meetings, or desk-crits on days not allocated to specific items
The schedule & outline are subject to change.
WEEK 1
16 Jen: Introduction to the Studio
Lecture: Tradition and Innovation in the interior architecture
23
Assignment #1: Palazzo Bargagli: analysis and survey_ proposal for a residential space
Bldg plans will be hand out _ Due Jen 30
Site Visit: Santa Croce, the leather district and Piazza dei Ciompi
Reading: F. Stignani, Architectural wisdom, Code n°2, Feb|2008, pg.50-65
18 Jen: Lecture: Architectural composition and building typology: Interpreting historical
buildings
Case study#1: typology vs interior
Desk-Crit: Ass. #1 sketching + sections + elevations
Reading: G. Caniggia, G. Maffei, Architectural composition and building typology
Firenze: Alinea, 2001. Tables 1-20-23-26-27-31-42-47
WEEK 2
23 Jen: Pin Up Assignment #1
Lecture: Theory and practice of interior architecture
Case study#2: The renovation of Palazzo Salotti (XIV Century)
Reading: C. Pearson, Design vanguard, Architectural Record n°12, Dec|2007, pg.67-119
25 Jen: Desk-Crit: Ass. #1 perspectives + 3D + renderings + model
Lecture: Theory and practice of interior architecture
Case study#3: Renovation of Palazzo Monaldeschi-Ranieri (XV-XVII Centuries)
Reading: L. Malfona, Punta della dogana contemporary art center, Venice, l’ Industria
delle Costruzioni n°411, Gen-Feb|2010, pg. 88-97
WEEK 3
30 Jen: Pin Up: Assignment #1
Site Visit: Retail/restaurant in Florence: alle murate and ora d’aria
Reading: E. Valacchi, Elio Di Franco “alle murate”, And n°13 Sept-Dec|2008, pg.4245
1 Feb: Guest lecture: Communication Techniques and graphic representation
Arch. Donatello D’angelo
Reading: J. Olivares, The size of memory, Domus n° 951, Oct|2011, pg. 94
Site Visit: private architecture and communication firm: d-apostrophe s.r.l.
WEEK 4
6 Feb: Assignment #2: MID TERM REQUIREMENT: iarch x 10rosso
Proposal for a show room fitting in the core of Florence_ Due Feb 29
Site Visit: Interior concept store and show room: 10 rosso Florence
Reading: G. Gerosa, Harmony of contrasts, Code n°2, Feb|2008 , pg.86-92
8 Feb: Guest lecture: Opportunities for innovation and creative thinking
Arch. Mara Pasquini – Arch. Marco Terconi – Arch. Carlo Tocco
Reading: L. Luperi, Minimal baroque, And n°13 sept-dec|2008, pag.46-49
Site Visit: retail in Florence: Luisa via roma
WEEK 5
13 Feb: Desk crits: Ass.#2
Guest lecture: Design solution and interior construction
Arch. Gabriele Bartocci
Reading: S. Yelavich, Paolo Zermani inside the mask, Firenze Architettura, n°2|2009,
pg.12-19
Site Visit: private architecture firm: Bartocci _ Studio di Architettura
15 Feb: Desk crits: Ass.#2
Guest lecture: Design Process
Arch. Pier Paolo Rapanà
Reading: P. Rapanà, Naturale/Artificiale, And n°19, Dec|2010, pg.140-145
Site Visit: private architecture firm: Studio 10
24
WEEK 6
20 Feb: Desk crits: Ass.#2
Reading: F. Rosetti, Designing and product companies, And n°17, Gen-April|2010,
pg.86-95
22 Feb: Desk-Crit: Ass.#2
Reading: B. Sterling, The new materialism, Abitare n°482, May|2008, pg.138-145
WEEK 7
27 Feb: Desk crits: Ass.#2
29 Feb: Midterm External Review
Jury: Arch. Mara Pasquini | Arch. Marco Terconi | Arch. Carlo Tocco
Public presentation at 10rosso interior concept store. Refreshment will be served
WEEK 8 SPRING BREAK
WEEK 9
12 March: Lecture: Learning from the Masters
Assignment #3: Individual research: topics will be proposed_ Due March 19
14, March: Desk crits: Ass.#3
Reading: S. Stephens, Design and time, Architectural Record, n°4|2011, pg.53-99
WEEK 10
19 March: Pin Up: Assignment #3
Lecture: Interior construction and building system
Case study#4: The Hotel Palazzo Piccolomini (XVI_XVII Centuries)
Reading: C. Achilli, The Hotel Palazzo Piccolomini, Architectural Digest, n°313
June 2007 pg. 185-187
Assignment #4: FINAL TERM REQUIREMENT: Hotel Palazzo Bargagli _ Due
April 23
21 March: Site Visit: Riva Loft Hotel
Reading: E. Bedarida, Claudio Nardi, Riva Loft, And n°13, Sept-Dec |2008, pg.50-53
WEEK 11
26 March: Lecture: Reuse of historic structures for contemporary functions
Case study#5: The Palazzo Simoncelli-Caravajal (XVII Century)
Desk crits: Ass. #4
28 March: Lecture: Theory and practice of interior architecture
Case study # 4: Restyling of Tuscan farmhouses
Site Visit: La Limonaia Residential suburban villa in Florence _ via B. Fortini 18
WEEK 12
2 April: Lecture: Furniture, fixtures, equipment and finish materials in the Florentine
dwelling
Case study#6: The Palazzo Barberino-Tafani (XVII-XIX Centuries)
Site Visit: The Palazzo Barberino-Tafani
Reading: Friedman, Carlo Scarpa Architect: Museum of Castel Vecchio,
pp.67-86
Desk crits: Ass. #4
4 April: Guest Lecture: space and form | color and light
Arch.Tami Eyal
Site Visit: private architecture firm: Studio63_architecture+design_via Santo Spirito,
6
Reading: P.Di Nardo, Design Michele De Lucchi, Disenchantment of light, And n°20 Gen-
25
April|2011, pg.109-115
WEEK 13
9 April: Holiday - Institute Closed
11 April: PRATO FIELD TRIP
by train from SMN_TS @ 3.10 pm following program and schedule
Site Visit: Urban Center at Palazzo Pacchiani, Museo del Tessuto, OpificioJM
Reading: M. Pizzi, Environment: organic contemporary furniture, Abitare n° 506,
Oct|2010, pg. 130-147
WEEK 14
16 April: Desk crits: Assignment #6
18 April: Desk crits: Assignment #6
19, 20 April: MILAN FIELD TRIP
by High Speed Train from SMN_TS Friday 10/02 @ 2.55 pm following program and
schedule
Site Visit: Design Museum: La triannale, Studio Castiglioni, Salone del Mobile,
Driade
Reading: A. Santos, Fedding Milan, Code n°2, Feb|2008, pg.40-49
WEEK 15
23 April: Final Examination
Jury: Arch. Silvia Catitti | Arch. Stefano Corazzini | Arch. Franco Pisani | Arch. Daniela
Sinicropi
25 April: no class
WEEK 16
30 April: Debriefing
3 May: Recording Projects and Studio Clean Up
26
Architecture in Context
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Franco Pisani, Licensed Architect
Credits: 3
Office Hours: by appointment
Site Visit fee: $ 125
Email : [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Architecture in context: Hidden Florence.
The goal of the course goal is to teach students a method to understand, analyse and evaluate
a city/site and its context. The intention is to produce tools that will be useful and applicable
in Architectural Design and in professional life. The course will focus on Florence as a living
city rather than an open air museum for tourist. It will help the students to read and
understand the context of the city beyond the monuments. As architects we never draw on
blank sheets of paper; hidden lines - sometimes more, sometimes less - are always present.
This course will provide students with an approach as well as with the basic tools to
recognize those hidden lines. During this semester we will cultivate the experience of looking
at architecture with a different eye, focusing on the invisible links and relations between
things. Le Corbusier used to say “…one obelisque: not architecture. Two obelisques:
architecture!” Using Florence and it’s built history as a case study, we will explore the
various meaning of context: urban context, landscape and geography, social and human
environment, historical processes and stratified layers. Architecture in context is about
process, ideas, programs and passion in facing unknown contexts even more than about final
products. In your work, at desk crits, and during presentations instructor and crits will be
looking for evidence that you are searching and exploring the context as something new and
that you listen to and respond constructively to feedback and advices from teachers and peers.
METHODOLOGIES AND OBJECTIVES
The course is based on a three contact hours per week.
The course is divided into two blocks of 90min. on Monday afternoon: 4,00>5.30PM and
5.30>7,00PM; one of these blocks (5.30>7,00PM) will be used for lectures and general
communications mandatory for all the class, the other one for site visits and in-progress
assistance on assignement.
The goal is a closer relationship with the site, recognizing its elements, stratified layers,
behaviours, dimensions and figures. We will look at Florence and its monuments from
different points of view, trying to go behind appearances.
Drawings will be instruments to understand and communicate architectonic thoughts.
SKETCHBOOK
students are required to maintain one (minimum) individual A5 (21x14,8) sketchbook for the
sole use in this class, for recording field research, exploration of precedents, lectures, reading
notes. Instructor wants to "see your in-progress experience". Make a conscious effort to
record and date in your sketchbook your design process. Make every sketch worthwhile and
worth saving to show and record the progress of your ideas.
Sketchbooks may be collected at any time and will be a graded component of the course (10%
of final grade). Hand-out with list (one for each week in Florence) of mandatory subjects will
be available in the first week.
ASSIGNMENTS
Three small assignments will be given during the semester focusing on different topics:
1_self presentation> due week2
27
2_understanding context> due Mid term
For the midterm assignment students will be asked to work forming two units groups.
During the semester students will work on a strongly characterized context, studying its
layered nature, mapping the site according to different themes.
A precise presentation of the assignment will be on week 2.
3_portfolio>due Final presentation
The portfolio is individual, it will be formed by at least 14 A3 boards on different topics.
Detailed specifications on portfolios will be available the first week of class.
GRADING AND EVALUATION
Assignments must be completed on time. Late submissions will not be graded. This is a
design class and the quality of your work is of great importance. Final grades will be
calculated according to the following schedule:
Attendance
5%
Sketchbook
25%
Mid term
25%
Portfolio
30%
Assignment1
5%
Participation
10%
STANDARDS
A - excellent, enlightened invention. Superlative or exemplary work, initiative beyond the
description of the problem. Significant understanding of the problem. Conceptual clarity.
Attended by an attitude of selfmotivated exploration, open-mindedness, and a willingness to
benefit from criticism.
B - good, convincing development and comprehensive resolution. Very good, some
exemplary work, a thorough understanding of the problem. Project displays conceptual
foundation, well crafted. Competence and mastery of skills. Open, inquisitive attitude.
C - satisfactory, exploration of alternatives in the resolution of the project. Satisfactory or
adequate work which meets the minimum requirements of the problem and course. Shows
understanding of the problem, with some deficiencies. Reasonable mastery of skill and
concepts. This grade is seen to represent the average solution.
D - passing, consideration of factual knowledge and complete presentation. Work which
is complete, but demonstrates deficient skills and does not show an understanding of the
problem or
expectations. Work often attended with closed-minded attitude with respect to criticism and
self-motivation. Although technically passing, this work is unacceptable in a professional
program.
F - failure
ATTENDANCE AND PARTECIPATION
Attendance is mandatory (10%of final grade).
You are required to attend every class. If you cannot make it to class, always notify your
instructor in advance.
Two missed classes will lower the final grade, more than three un-excused absences can result in
automatic failure of the course.
Chronic tardiness (3 times) will be considered one absence. Lateness, excessive coming-andgoing, and leaving early are disruptive, disrespectful, and unacceptable.
Active and responsible participation is an important component of student work.
Be efficient, learn to develop good time-management skills. You are expected to participate
actively in all discussions and pin-ups. Unsupervised time during desk crits should be highly
productive and self-motivated.
28
MID TERM AND FINAL EXAM
Communicating your ideas clearly, and documenting your work effectively is a crucial part of
the design process and becoming an architect. As part of an effort to record your work for the
future all students will be REQUIRED to create effective and graphically well-designed
presentation. Make sure the presentation of your design ideas is complete, convincing and
professional. Start working as soon as possible: ten minutes a day produce better projects than
a two sleepless day session close to deadlines. Work within the time constraints to maximize
the expression of your ideas. Make sure that your products represent all of your ideas, without
too much repetition, without needing to embellish too much with words. Make sure each
drawing or model says something distinct and important. If it's superfluous, leave it out. Make
sure your verbal presentation is SHORT and to the point. Make sure to outline your main
points in advance.
Mid term: February 27th. Presentation of assignment#2 in powerpoint 20x20 format to the
class and guest crits. (25% of the final grade)
Final exam: April 30th. The final exam will consist in the examination of the portfolios (30%
of final grade)
VISITS
A series of mandatory site visits will be organized, in and around Florence. Meeting places
will be announced time by time. Students are responsible for knowing when and where to go.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
texts


Fei S., Gobbi Sica G., Sica P. " Florence: an outline of urban history" Firenze: Alinea, 1995
AA.VV. Firenze e dintorni. Guide Rosse. Touring Editore,1983
In addition to the required over mentioned readings (one for a short history of the city and one
as a good guide to the city), an individual bibliography will be recommended to each student
according to the topic the project or of the assignment.
SCHEDULE
w day
h
0
1
2
jan 16
topic
lecture
introduction and
presentation of the course,
organization of schedule,
faq.
11AM
orientation
4PM5.25PM
meeting at palazzo rucellai groups forming
assignment#1: personal
5.35PM- profile & portfolio (due
7.00PM mon 19)+group
organization
assignement#2: an urban
parasite in florence (due
4PMjan 23
midterm) and final
5.25PM
assignment: towering
above the rest
5.35PM7.00PM
29
deadlines
architecture in context:
HIDDEN FLORENCE
assignment
#1
THE CITY: a neverending
series of modification
8.00AM
>7.00PM
4PMjan 30
5.25PM
on site: pienza e
montalcino
jan 27
3
4
5
6
feb 6
feb13
feb 20
on site: santa maria novella
5.35PM7.00PM
THE DRIFT. Tools and
methods to navigate the
context.
4PM5.25PM
ON SITE: san frediano
5.35PM7.00PM
URBAN FABRIC:
typologies and context
4PM5.25PM
ON SITE: santa croce
5.35PM7.00PM
AFTERWAR
RECONSTRUCTION IN
ITALY.
4PM5.25PM
ON SITE: san frediano
QART02_an housing
project. via pisana 14, 16,
18
mid term exams
presentations and critics @
palazzo
alamanni_arch.studio
AIC pecha kutcha:
20x20=6'40"
5.35PM7.00PM
7
feb 27
4PM5.25PM
5.35PM7.00PM
8
9
1
0
1
1
mar
2-mar
11
mar
4PM12
5.25PM
mar
19
mar2
3
mar
26
1
2
apr2
1
apr9
fall break
ON SITE: la strozzina
5.35PMq&a for final assignment
7.00PM
FRK competitions.
Strategies and
comunication.
4PM5.25PM
ON SITE: via bufalini
5.35PM7.00PM
GIOVANNI
MICHELUCCI: hundred
years of Italian architecture
8.00AM
>7.00PM
4PM5.25PM
5.35PM7.00PM
4PM5.25PM
5.35PM7.00PM
4PMNational Holiday: easter
30
on site: firenze sprawl tour
ARCHITECTURE AS
PERFORMANCE
THE HYBRID CITY
5.25PM monday (institute closed)
5.35PM7.00PM
3
1
4
apr16
1
5
apr23
1
6
WHAT MAKES A
HOME? standards and
strategies for housing.
4PM5.25PM
5.35PMPORTFOLIO layout
7.00PM
general review
2.30PMapr30
FINALS
3.55PM
4PMcomments and evaluations
5.25PM
31
final
assignment
The Villa and The Garden
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Silvia Catitti, Ph.D., Licensed Architect
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site Visit fee: $ 170
E mail: [email protected]
Main goals




to look carefully at villas, palaces and gardens;
to develop a vocabulary (regarding form, style, function) so as to express what we see;
to explore the function of the works we study;
to consider what they can tell us about the society that created them.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course explores villas and gardens to better understand how men and women, from
different times, cultures, and countries, transformed the relationship between Architecture and
Nature. We focus on the dynamic relationship between villas and their gardens, architects and
clients, tradition and innovation. We concentrate mainly on the Renaissance and Baroque
periods in Tuscany and Rome, where gardens where conceived as part of a multifaceted
architectural system. The ‘villa & garden’ complex originates in the Mediterranean area,
especially ancient Greece and Rome. In Renaissance Tuscany the early formal garden took
shape, later becoming the ‘rational’ geometrical garden as an extension of the architecture of
the villa. From our base in Tuscany, we look South, to the development of villa and garden
design for Popes and Cardinals in Renaissance Rome; we look North, to the villa type
designed by Andrea Palladio in Veneto (a model for the 18th and 19th century villas in
Northern Europe and America). Then we look at how Anglo-American intellectuals and
collectors in Europe at the turn of the century absorbed and transformed the classical ideal of
villa and garden. We study the stimulating impact of 18th-century England on Florentine
culture and gardens, the creation of a sophisticated variation of the Renaissance formal garden
in early 20th-century Tuscany, and the revolutionary effects of the encounter of a California
collector with Le Corbusier in Paris. Lectures indoors based on powerpoint presentations will
be followed by the most enjoyable experience of villas and gardens on site visits.
EVALUATION OF STUDENTS
Term paper
30%
Midterm test
25%
Final test
25%
Participation and discussion of readings
10%
Reading assignment
10%
Term paper. Students in teams of two will choose to work on a topic from a list provided by
professor. They will work on a research paper or creative project. Students working on a
research project will write six to eight pages (plus endnotes, bibliography, and illustrations).
Additional forms of expression (previously approved by professor), e.g. diagrams and
sketches, are also welcome. Students working on a creative project will provide a four page
research paper (plus endnotes, bibliography, and illustrations) introducing concepts and
summarizing the presentation. The presentation of the creative project may consist of a
written or performed dialogue, mock-correspondence, powerpoint presentation, video, or
magazine, showing knowledge of the chosen topic. The assignment of the Term Paper will be
discussed on week 4. Topics will be submitted on week 6. Outlines and bibliography are due
on week 10. All term papers in pdf format are due on week 13. Delays in fulfilling the
deadlines will lower your grade.
32
Midterm test. Part one: Short answers. Part two: one short essay (at least 500 words) on a
topic covered in the first half of the course.
Final test. Part one: Short answers. Part two: one short essay (at least 500 words) on a topic
covered in the second half of the course.
Participation and discussion of readings. Students are expected to participate in all classes
and in discussions of readings.
Reading assignment. Daily readings are due for all students. Every day of class one student
will present the reading due for that day and will lead the class discussion. The same student
will send his comments in advance to the professor by replying (in one or two sentences) to 4
questions:
1. which is the background of the author and which is his/her perspective
2. the key idea of the reading
3. one idea you learnt from the reading
4. one point you did not understand or one point you disagree with.
The designated student will submit his/her replies via e-mail (to [email protected]) by
midnight the day before the due. Delays in submitting your comments will lower your grade.
A FEW MORE DETAILS
- Attendance is required. If you miss class or site visits for any reason you must visit sites on
your own; you must buy your own ticket which cannot be reimbursed. Two absences
(including travel time with --or visits of-- friends or family) can be justified by a personal
note without penalty. More absences will lower your grade. For medical absences, please
submit a doctor’s note within one week after you return.
- Punctuality is required (see also the following issue.) If you are late on-site the professor
will not be able to leave a ticket for you at the ticket office. You must purchase your own
ticket which cannot be reimbursed.
- Arriving late and leaving earlier. Repeated lateness will lower your grade. Please do not
ask to leave class earlier. The professor must be informed in advance if you will be late or
if you must leave earlier for academic or institutional reasons.
- Food and Drink. Please do not eat during class time (including lectures on site visits.) Feel
free to drink but please do not take out bottles when we are on site.
- Phone calls, text messages, and e-mails. Please, no telephone calls, text messages, and emails during class time (including lectures on site visits.)
- Photos. Feel free to take photographs after class and after lectures on site visits.
- Visitors. Unfortunately, visitors may not join our class. Please do not ask to make
exceptions.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
Basic Bibliography: (source of materials in Reader):
-
James S. Ackerman, The Villa. Form and Ideology of Country Houses, Washington, D.C., 1990
Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Landscape Design. A Cultural and Architectural History, New York,
2001
David R. Coffin, The Villa in the Life of Renaissance Rome, Princeton, 1979
Roger J. Crum - John T. Paoletti, eds., Renaissance Florence. A Social History, Cambridge, 2006
Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Medici Gardens: From Making to Design, Philadelphia, 2008
Richard A. Goldthwaite, The Building of Renaissance Florence, Baltimore-London, 1982
Claudia Lazzaro, The Italian Renaissance Garden, New Haven-London, 1990
Daniela Mignani, The Medicean Villas by Giusto Utens, Florence, 1991
Christopher Thacker, The History of Gardens, London, 1979
The History of Garden Design, ed. by Monique Mosser - Georges Teyssot, London, 1991
Edith Wharton, Italian Villas and Their Gardens, New York, 1904
33
COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK 1: Inside/outside the City Walls. What is a Palace? What is a Villa? What is a
Garden?
Mon., January 18: Introduction to the Course
- Reading: #1, Wharton (reader pp. 1-5)
♣♣♣
Wed., January 20: ♣ Visit to the Davanzati Museum, and to the Strozzi and Rucellai Palaces
- Reading Due: #2, Ackerman (reader pp. 6-31); #3, Goldthwaite (pdf)
WEEK 2: Villas vs Palaces in Renaissance Florence. Form, Function and Social Aspects
Mon., January 23: ♣ Visit to the Medici Palace
- Reading Due: #4, Crum-Paoletti (reader pp. 41-50); #5, Linghor (reader pp. 51-67)
♣♣♣
Wed., January 25: The Early Medicis. Villas & Gardens as Intellectual Retreats
- Reading Due: #6, Ackerman (reader pp. 117-142); #7, Mignani (intro +Cafaggiolo: reader
pp. 93-99, 100-102)
WEEK 3: Outside the City Walls. Self-Representation + Enjoyment of Nature
Mon., January 3: Discussion of the Readings
- Reading Due: #7, Barlow Rogers (reader pp. 33-40)
♣♣♣
Wed., February 1: The Early Medicis. Villa Medici in Fiesole and Poggio a Caiano
- Reading Due: #8, Mignani (intro+Poggio: reader pp. 93-99, 103-105); #9, Mazzini (reader
pp. 68-73 + pdf)
♣♣♣
Fri., February 3, 9am-4pm: ♣ Visit to Villa Medici in Fiesole and Walk in the Woods
WEEK 4: Ancient Roman Ideals Revived. Villas & Gardens in Antiquity
Mon., February 6: The Villa of a Private Citizen + Virtual Trip to Pompeii
- Reading Due: #10, Barlow Rogers (reader pp. 75-86, 92)
♣♣♣
Wed., February 8: The Villa of a Leader + Archeobotany and Ancient Gardens
- Reading Due: #11, Barlow Rogers (reader pp. 86-92) + Assignment of Term Paper
WEEK 5: Villas & Gardens of the Medici Dukes as Places of Entertainment
Mon., February 13: Cosimo I and Eleonora of Toledo. Pitti Place and Boboli Gardens
- Reading Due: #12, Mignani (intro+Pitti/Boboli: reader pp. 93-99, 113-115)
♣♣♣
Wed., February 15: ♣ Visit to Pitti Palace and Boboli Gardens
- Reading Due: #13, Lazzaro (reader pp. 190- 212)
♣♣♣
Fri., February 17: 9am-1pm: ♣ Visit to the Medici Villas of La Petraia and Castello
- Reading Due: (#14) Lazzaro (reader pp. 213-235); (#15) Lapi Ballerini (reader pp. 236-239)
WEEK 6: Villas & Gardens of the Medici Grandukes as Places of Self-Representation
Mon., February 20: Villa La Petraia and Villa of Castello + Submit topic of Term Paper
- Reading Due: #16, Mignani (intro+Castello+La Petraia: reader 93-99, 106-112)
♣♣♣
Wed., February 22: Overview
- Reading Due: none
WEEK 7: Exam Week
Mon., February 27: no class
♣♣♣
34
Wed., February 29, 2 hours: Midterm Exam
WEEK 8: Midterm Break (March 2 - 11)
WEEK 9: Beyond Tuscany. Renaissance Villas & Gardens in Papal Rome
Mon., March 12: Popes and Bankers. Villa Belvedere and Villa Farnesina-Chigi
- Reading Due: #17, Barlow Rogers (reader pp. 143-145); #18, #19, Coffin (reader pp. 147164, 165-179)
♣♣♣
Wed., March 14: Cardinals. Villa Giulia and Villa d’Este
- Reading Due: #20, #21, Coffin (reader pp. 324-332, 309-323); #22, Lazzaro (reader pp. 333360)
♣♣♣
Fri., March 16, all day: ♣ Day trip to Rome: Visit to Villa Farnesina and Villa Giulia
- Reading Due: #23, Coffin (reader pp. 297-308)
WEEK 10: Beyond Tuscany. The Villa Life in Northern Italy
Mon., March 19: no class + Submit outlines and bibliography
♣♣♣
Wed., March 21: Andrea Palladio in Veneto
- Reading Due: #24, Barlow Rogers (reader pp. 265-266); #25, Ackerman (reader pp. 267295)
WEEK 11: The Anglo-Americans in Europe. I. Florence
Landscape Garden and the Picturesque in Late 19th-Century Florence
Mon., March 26: The Villa, Garden, and Eclectic Collections of Fredrick Stibbert
- Reading Due: #26, Barlow Rogers (pdf); #27, Ackerman (reader pp. 362-387)
♣♣♣
Wed., March 28: ♣ Visit to Frederick Stibbert’s Villa, Garden, and Collections
- Reading Due: #28, Gobbi Sica (pdf); #29, Stibbert (reader pp. 388-392)
WEEK 12: The Anglo-Americans in Europe. II. Florence
Anglo-American Intellectuals in Early 20th-Century Tuscany
Mon., April 2: Cecil Pinsent and the Making of the “Italianate Villa & Garden”
- Reading Due: #30, Campbell (reader pp. 394-399); #9, Mazzini (reader pp. 68-73)
♣♣♣
Wed., April 4: ♣ Visit to Villa Le Balze
- Reading Due: #31, Shacklock (reader pp. 400-409)
WEEK 13: The Anglo-Americans in Europe. III
Mon., April 9: no class (National Holiday)
♣♣♣
Wed., April 11: Le Corbusier and his “Machine for Living” for a Revolutionary Art
Collector from California: Villa Stein in Paris
- eading Due: #31, Pilto (pdf)
WEEK 14: Term Paper Week
Mon., April 16: Final Review of Term Paper
- Reading Due: none
♣♣♣
Wed., April 18: Students’ Presentations
- Reading Due: none + Submit Term Paper
35
WEEK 15: Conclusions
Mon., April 23: Discussion
- Reading Due: none
♣♣♣
Wed., April 25: Overview
- Reading Due: none
WEEK 16: Exam Week
Mon., April 30: no class
- Reading Due: none
♣♣♣
Wed., May 2, 2 hours: Final Exam
- Reading Due: none
36
History of Italian Design
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Paolo Di Nardo, Licensed Architect
Credits: 3
Office Hours: by appointment
Site visit fee: $ 200
Email : [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course is intended as a "journey" of knowledge in the design world not limited only to the
historical evolution and development of design. History of design is about people, their
secrets and anecdotes, insights and methods that have produced ideas and objects which have
became part of our culture. The didactics is oriented to give students a critical understanding
beyond the concept of Beauty and the individual categories of "I like" or "I dislike" through
the exploration of cultural, social, artistic and industrial elements demonstrating how design
has had a distinct role in the shift towards modernity through Italy’s 20th century.
Topics include: 1940-1950: design and architecture during post-war age and economical
boom. 1960-1970: Radicals, Pop culture and Psychedelia. 1980-2000: form, function and
decoration in Post-modern dimension, last tendencies and debate from 2000 to the present.
Comparative analysis with art, architecture and fashion design will enable students to
understand industrial production in its specific historical and cultural context. Examples of
Italian Designers through their writings or notes or, if possible through meetings or lectures in
class, will also help to intimately enter the design “know how".
COURSE GOAL, FORMAT AND COURSEWORK
The aim of the course is to provide students with analytic tools to understand the meaning and
the value of a design object as a product resulting from a complex knowledge.
At the end of the course students will be able to correctly describe an industrial and artistic
product, to correlate its explicit and hidden meanings to the social and cultural context. The
student will also be given the opportunity to give definition to a subject whose boundaries are
often blurred for the vocation to interact with other artistic disciplines. The first part of the
course will address the definition of Design through Italy's main Designers, their images,
writings and interviews. It will focus on the creative process with constant reference to
products and Designers. This tool will provide the critical principals of Italian design.
Class activities will include critical-historical files and the redesign of a popular design
object. Because redrawing an industrial product after analysing its explicit and hidden
features will disclose its peculiar design process and some universal values of the creative
process. Each student wil have two spots of 15 minutes in the semestre for a review on the inprogress assignment. The participation grade also reflects in-class discussion.
EVALUATION – GRADING POLICY
Participation and discussion of course topics 20% - Critical-Historical Files 20% - Midterm
test 20% - Final Test 20%
High grades will be awarded for work that demonstrates:
▪ a good knowledge of course material, and the ability to articulate eloquently on the subject
through the use of appropriate terminology in order to express judgements regarding the
aesthetic and technical relevance of a design product in relation to its social and cultural
context.
▪ a basic knowledge of contemporary industrial production processes and materials.
▪ the capacity to elaborate a personal creative process from concept to design.
37
ATTENDANCE POLICY – CLASS PARTICIPATION
Attendance is expected in all classes. Lateness and unexcused absenteeism will lower your
grade and more than three absences will have a substantial impact on it.
Class participation is absolute necessary.
▪ Examinations will not be rescheduled.
▪ Friends or relatives are strictly not permitted to attend class or any of our visits.
▪ No eating during class time.
▪ No telephone calls during class time
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
TEXTBOOK-BIBLIOGRAPHY
Readings will be assigned and discussed in class from the following books:
▪ Penny Sparke, Italian design : 1870 to the present, Thames and Hudson, London 1988
▪ Giampiero Bosoni, Paola Antoneli, Italian design, The Museum of Modern Art, New York 2008
SOURCES
-
▪ Emilio Ambasz, Italy:The New Domestic Landscape: Achievements and problems of Italian
Design, Centro Di, Firenze 1972
▪ Nina Bornsen-Holtmann, Italian Design, Taschen, Koln 1994
▪ Cristina Morozzi, Silvio San Pietro, Mobili italiani contemporanei, L’Archivolto, Milano 1996
▪ Almerigo De Angeli, Design: the italian way, Modo, Milano 2001
▪ Giampiero Bosoni, Guy Cogeval, Il Modo italiano: Iatalian Design and Avant-garde in the 20th
Century, Skira,Milano 2006
▪ Franca Gualtieri, A trip through Italian design, Mantova 2007
▪ Andrea Branzi, Silvia Annichiarico, Che cosa è il design italiano? Le sette ossessioni del design
italiano,Electa,Milano 2009
Giampiero Bosoni, Italian Design,Moma design series, Milano 2008
Luigi Settembrini, 500 years of italian forniture, Skira, Milano 2009
Norman Potter, Cos’è il design? (what is a designer),Cadice edizioni, 2002
Deyan Sudjic, The language of things, W.W. Norton and Company, N.W. 2009
Karl Mang, History of modern forniture, Academy editions, London 1979
Giampiero Bosoni, Il mondo italiano, Skira, Toronto 2007
Franco Mirenzi, Marco Zanuso Design dei tempi moderni, Arflex, Milano
Andrea Branzi, Il design italiano 1964-2000, Electa, Milano
LIBRARIES
▪ Public Architecture Library of the Università di Firenze, which has collection of 60000 books and
500 periodicals: Via Pier Antonio Micheli 2 - 50121 Florence. Tel.+39 55 5047015/5048982 Opening
hours: Mon - Fri 8:30 -19:00; Sat 8:30-13:00
On -line catalogue: http://opac.unifi.it/
▪ British Institute Library: Lungarno Guicciardini 9 – 50100 Florence Tel.+39 55 26878270
Opening hours: Mon - Fri 10:00 -18:30
COURSE TIMETABLE
WEEK 1
17 Jan: Introduction to the Course.
19 Jan: Design, a matter of method: Bruno Munari. Where is Design?
WEEK 2
24 Jan: Design, a matter of method: When is Design?
26 Jan: Design, a matter of method: Bruno Munari, From imagination to creativity
38
WEEK 3
31 Jan: Design, a matter of method: Michele De Lucchi. Traditional Innovation
2 Feb: Examples of Italian Design. 1940-1950: Italian design and architecture during post-war
age and economical boom.
WEEK 4
7 Feb: Examples of Italian Design. 1960-1970: Radicals, Pop culture and Psychedelia.
9 Feb: Examples of Italian Design. 1960-1970: Radicals, Pop culture and Psychedelia.
WEEK 5
14 Feb: Visual Communication: Form and Space Modulation
16 Feb: Visual Communication: Material and texture
WEEK 6
21 Feb: Critical-Historical Analysis: An object inside-out
23 Feb: Critical-Historical Analysis: An object inside-out
WEEK 7:
28 March: Critical-Historical Analysis: File completion
1 March: Midterm Exam
WEEK 8: BREAK
WEEK 9
13 March: Examples of Italian Design. 1980-2000: form, function and decoration in Postmodern dimension.
15 March: Examples of Italian Design. 1980-2000: form, function and decoration in Postmodern dimension.
WEEK 10
20 March: Tools of Design: Estrangement Effects, from Art to Design.
22 March: Tools of Design: Estrangement Effects, from Design to Architecture.
WEEK 11: Presentation of Assignment Draft
27 March: Tools of Design: The art of Simplification
29 March: Tools of Design: The art of Simplification
WEEK 12
3 April: Examples of Italian Design. Last tendencies and debate from 2000 to the present.
5 April: Examples of Italian Design. Last tendencies and debate from 2000 to the present.
WEEK 13
10 April: Tools of Design: From Big to Small and backwards. Lecture with Luisa Bocchietto
(to be confirmed).
12 April: Redesign – adding value
WEEK 14:
17 April: Redesign – adding value
19-20 April: Salone del Mobile (Milan Design Week). Fieldtrip
WEEK 15:
24 April: Redesign – adding value
26 April: Assignment discussion
WEEK 16: Final examination.
39
Architecture in Italy: History & Preservation
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Riccardo Pacciani, Ph.D.
Assistant: Daniela Sinicropi, Ph.D. Candidate, Licensed Architect
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site visit fee: $140
Email: [email protected]
Office hours by appointment.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Against the backdrop of the evolution of architecture in Italy, the course will examine
historically significant sites which have been preserved or adapted for contemporary use.
Historical and technical, as well as legal and bureaucratic aspects of preservations will be
considered. Selected readings, class discussion, site visits and guest lectures will form the
body of the work of the course. Paper topics may be chosen according to the specific interests
of the individual student.
COURSE GOAL, FORMAT AND COURSEWORK
The aim of the course is to give students the basic information and adequate tools necessary to
foster their awareness and knowledge of the field of preservation of the historicalarchitectural heritage. Students will be guided to perceive and understand today’s edifices in
relation to their historical and urban context. At the end of the course students will be able to
establish the historical value of the buildings by examining their present condition and
identifying each element and characteristic by means of their acquired knowledge of the
history of Italian architecture and of the basic theory and practice of historic preservation. In
addition, the student will acquire familiarity with the styles and works of some major masters,
including Brunelleschi, Palladio, Michelangelo, Bernini and Borromini, as they emerge within
their cultural context. The course combines slide lectures with numerous visits to monuments,
historical buildings and sites, including a day trip to Vicenza. Students must complete one
term paper. Participation includes one brief, informal, oral presentations. The participation
grade also reflects in-class discussion, which is based on the reading assignment.
EVALUATION – GRADING POLICY
Participation and discussion of reading 20%- Term paper 20% - Midterm test 30% - Final
Test 30%
High grades will be awarded for work that demonstrates:
▪ a good knowledge of course material, and the ability to recognise and identify a range of
specific historic buildings.
▪ the capacity to analyse a building through an exploration of its many transformations
deriving from different historical urban contexts and uses during the centuries.
▪ the ability to articulate clearly and fluently on the subject through the use of appropriate
terminology and methods, in order to express judgements regarding the transformation in the
form, style and function of building.
▪ a basic knowledge of contemporary restoration techniques for historic buildings; in
particular those of the Medieval and Renaissance periods.
ATTENDANCE POLICY – CLASS PARTICIPATION
Attendance is mandatory and expected in all classes. Lateness and unexcused absences will
lower your grade, and more than three absences will have a substantial impact on it.
40
Class participation is required. The various site visits and field trips provide the opportunity
for students to be involved directly in work analysis. Specifically:
▪ Punctuality is crucial for the entirety of this course. When class meets at a building,
monument or construction site, make sure you know in advance how to get there. If you’re
not sure set off early in case you get lost.
▪ Examinations will not be rescheduled for any reasons.
▪ Friends or relatives are strictly not permitted to attend class or any of our visits.
▪ No eating during class time.
▪ No telephone calls during class time (including lectures on site visits)
READINGS AND RECOMMENDED SOURCES
Readings will be assigned and discussed in class from the following books:
▪ A. Riegl, The Modern Cult of Monuments: Its Character and Its Origin, in Oppositions 25 (Fall
1982).
▪ S. Fei, Florence: an outline of urban history, Firenze: Alinea, 1995.
▪ G. Caniggia, G. Maffei, Architectural composition and building typology – Interpreting basic
building, Firenze: Alinea, 2001.
A.Grafton, Leon Battista Alberti, Master Builder of the Italian Renaissance, New York: Hill and
Wang, 2000.
▪ J. Burckhardt, The Architecture of the Italian Renaissance, Chicago: The University of Chicago
Press, 1985.
▪ R. Goy, The Venetian Palace – History of a Typology, London: Phaidon Press, 1997.
▪ J. Ackerman, Palladio, London: Penguin Books, 1966.
▪ G. Zucconi, Venice - an architectural guide, Verona: Arsenale editrice, 1993.
▪ B. Scheer, Typology and Urban Design Guidelines: Preserving the City Without Dictating Design in
Rethinking XIX th Century City. Attilio Petruccioli, Cambridge, Massachusetts: Akpia 1998.
▪ R. Wittkower, Art and Architecture in Italy, 1600-1750, New Haven: Yale U. Press, 1999.
▪ L. Benevolo The Architecture of the Reinaissance, Vol II, Boulder Colorado: West View press,
1978.
S.Kostof, The City Shaped, urban patterns and meanings through history, London: Bulfinch press,
1991.
▪ J. McKean, Giancarlo De Carlo, layered placed, London: Menges edition, 2004.
▪ R. King, Brunelleschi’s Dome – How a Renaissance Genius Reinvented Architecture, New York:
Penguin Books, 2001.
▪ L. Zanghery, D. Palterer, Mopa the new Museum of Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore, Firenze:
edizioni Polistampa, 2000.
▪ K. Kropf, “Typological Zoning” in Typological process and design theory. Attilio Petruccioli,
Cambridge, Massachusetts: Akpia 1995.
Library
▪ Public Architecture Library of the Università di Firenze, which has collection of 60000 books and
500 periodicals: Via Pier Antonio Micheli 2 - 50121 Florence. Tel.+39 55 5047015/5048982
Opening hours: Mon - Fri 8:30 -19:00; Sat 8:30-13:00
On -line catalogue: http://opac.unifi.it/
▪ British Institute Library: Lungarno Guicciardini 9 – 50100 Florence Tel.+39 55 26878270
Opening hours: Mon - Fri 10:00 -18:30
▪ Small but selected Architecture Library at Palazzo Alamanni: Architecture Studio, 23 via dei Renai,
50100 Florence Tel.+39 55 2343447 Opening hours: Tue & Thu 16:00 -19:00
Photo-Library
▪ Fratelli Alinari Museum of the History of Photography and Archives
http://business.alinari.it/login/index.asp
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and
they are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
41
COURSE TIMETABLE
WEEK 1
Jan 17: Introduction to the Course. Meet in class.
Jan 19: Guest Lecture Carlo Achilli, M. Sc. Licensed Architect
Reading
Fei, Chapter 1, From the Roman foundation to the Medieval Comune, pp. 9-21
WEEK 2
Jan 24: Visit to Piazza della Repubblica: the Roman City Form
1.00 pm: Meet at the entrance to Palazzo Rucellai
Reading
Fei, Chapter 3, Arnolfo’s great enlargement and the fourteenth century events, pp. 41-56
Jan 26: Walking tour of Medieval neighbourhood: Santa Croce.
1.00 pm: Meet at church of Santa Croce.
Reading
Grafton, Chapter 5, Interpreting Florence: from reading to rebuilding, pp.152-187
WEEK 3
Jan 31: Theory and practice of historic preservation: Builidng preservation in Europe and in
Italy.
Reading
Benevolo, Chapter 1, The inventors of the new architecture, pp. 11-29
Feb 2: Walking tour of Medieval neighbourhood: Santo Spirito.
1.00 pm: Meet at church of Santo Spirito.
Reading
Benevolo, Chapter 1, The inventors of the new architecture, pp. 29-44
WEEK 4
Feb 7: Renaissance in Italian Architecture.
The work of Filippo Brunelleschi.
Reading
Benevolo, Chapter 1, The inventors of the new architecture, pp. 44-81
Feb 9: Visit to Ospedale degli Innocenti – Restoration, preservation and adaptive reuse of the
historic building converted in to a contemporary Museum and children’s activity center.
1.00 pm: Meet at entrance to Ospedale degli Innocenti, Piazza SS. Annunziata
Reading
Fei, Chapter 5, The end of the Republic approaches, pp. 71-82
WEEK 5
Feb 14: Investigative Techniques for historic structures
Reading
Benevolo, Chapter 5, The crisis of sensibility, pp. 595-611 23
Feb 16: The Cupola of Santa Maria Del Fiore.
Filippo Brunelleschi’s greatest endeavor.
Reading
King, Chapters 1-3, pp 1 - 31
42
WEEK 6
Feb 21: The work of Michelangelo Buonarroti. Guest Lecture Arch. Silvia Catitti, PhD
Reading
Ackerman, introduction, Michelangelo, pp. 25-36
Feb 23: Visit to the Sacrestia Nuova in S. Lorenzo Church hand out San Lorenzo map
1.00 pm: Meet at the entrance to S. Lorenzo Church
Reading
Murray, The Architecture of the Italian Renaissance, pp.171-182
WEEK 7: Topic list for term papers available
February 28: Reading Discussion
March 1: Midterm Exam
WEEK 8: BREAK
WEEK 9
March 13: Investigative Techniques for historic structures
Guest Lecture Carlo Achilli, M. Sc. Licensed Architect
A Case Study: The Hotel Palazzo Piccolomini
Reading
Benevolo, Chapter 5, The crisis of sensibility, pp. 623-649
March 15: Roman Architecture during XVII & XVIII centuries.
The work of Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Reading
Benevolo, Chapter 5, The crisis of sensibility, pp. 611-623
WEEK 10
March 20: Roman Architecture during XVII & XVIII centuries.
The work of Francesco Borromini
March 22: Vicenza - The City and its Architecture.
The work of Andrea Palladio
Reading
Murray, The Architecture of the Italian Renaissance, pp.207-236
March 24: VICENZA Fieldtrip
Reading
Ackerman, Chapter 5, Principles of Palladio’s Architecture, pp.160-185 hand out article
WEEK 11: Outline (or first draft) of the term paper must be turned in
March 27: Guest Lecture Carlo Achilli, M. Sc. Licensed Architect
Reading
Caniggia, Maffei, Chapter 2, Buildings as individuation of building types, pp.75-107
March 29: Visit to Museum Opera del Duomo
Reading
Jokilehto, Chapter 7, A History of Architectural Conservation, pp. 174-182
WEEK 12
April 3: Regulatory, legislative and planning methods to conserve historic neighbourhoods &
buildings, rural landscapes & recycled structures.
Reading
43
Friedman, Carlo Scarpa Architect: Museum of Castel Vecchio, pp.67-86
April 5: Visit to Museum Marini
1.00 pm: Meet at the front entrance to Palazzo Rucellai
Reading
Giovannetti, Typological Process towards Urban Rehabilitation, pp.73-89
WEEK 13
April 10: Neo-Classical Architecture & The Floreale Style in Florence
Reading
Richardson-Upp, Industrial Evolution: Preservation Through Judicious Demolition of 20th
Century Industrial Buildings, pp.47-56
April 12: Visit to Borgo Ognissanti: Casa Galleria
1.00 pm: Meet at the front entrance to Palazzo Rucellai
WEEK 14: Term papers due
April 17: Visit to Borgo Pinti & Piazza Massimo D’Azeglio
1.00 pm: Meet at Piazza Salvemini – Billa Market
Reading
Kropf, Typological Zoning in Typological process and design theory, pp. 127-140
April 19: Visit to Palazzo Davanzati
1.00 pm: Meet at the front entrance to Palazzo Rucellai
Reading
Fei, Chapter 8, Florence after 1860. The plan to enlarge the city and later events, pp. 127-152
WEEK 15:
April 24: Term Paper & reading discussion
April 26: Term Paper presentation
WEEK 16: Final examination.
.
44
The Art of Florence: Exploring Visual Culture
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructors: Francesca Marini, Ph.D.
Anatole Tchikine, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site-visits fee: $85
COURSE DESCRIPTION
During the Renaissance, roughly defined as the period extending from the middle of the 14 th
century until the end of the 16th century, the city of Florence was the site of some of the most
remarkable artistic creativity in European history. Why, though, should one city have
contributed so much to the course of the arts? Why should so many of the city’s works of art,
monuments, and buildings have played a major rule in the development of the visual arts?
What set of circumstances and conditions made this possible? This course is designed to
explore these questions through an examination of historical factors that made Florence the
birthplace and point of reference for what we now call “Renaissance art.” We will examine
the careers and achievements of some of the central figures working in Florence, including
Giotto, Filippo Brunelleschi, Donatello, Masaccio, Lorenzo Ghiberti, Fra Angelico, Fra
Filippo Lippi, Sandro Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. Starting with
the monumental site of the Duomo (the Cathedral of Florence), the first part of the course will
focus on the development of sculpture and its architectural setting, emphasizing the
circumstances of urban history that demanded public, monumental programs of architecture
and sculpture. The first half of the course will end with an amplification of Filippo
Brunelleschi’s achievement in the Pazzi Chapel, while providing an introduction to Giotto
and fresco painting in Santa Croce. The second part of the semester will concentrate on the
development of painting in the 15th century, and then move on to the Cinquecento (sixteenth
century) with the achievements of Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael. Emphasis will be
placed on studying the art preserved and exhibited in Florentine museums and contained in
monuments that often constitute its original site; therefore, class meetings will alternate
between lectures in the classroom at Palazzo Rucellai, and study on site, so that the students
will have the opportunity each week to experience original art rather than digital images. We
will analyse the art within a sequence of contexts, in order to understand the cultural, political,
economic and religious factors that contributed to the production of art in Renaissance
Florence.
AIM OF THE COURSE
The fundamental goals are to introduce students to the art and architecture of Florence in its
historical context, and in doing so, to make them familiar with the origins, nature and
development of the Renaissance in the visual arts. Mastery of basic concepts and terminology
of art historical studies is another essential aspect of this course.
TEXTS: Students will purchase Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, by Loren
Partridge, Paperback, 2009; History of Italian Renaissance Art, Frederick Hartt and David G.
Wilkins (New York, Abrams, 2003), chapters from Frederick Hartt’s and Loren Partridge’s
texts will be assigned for Readings on the specific artists and art historical information; titles,
dates, etc. For the latter text, several copies of the volume will be put on reserve in the library.
TESTING: A mid-term and final exam will be given, with one written exercise that combines
visual analysis with research.
45
REQUIRED READING
Text for classroom meetings and lectures: History of Italian Renaissance Art, Frederick Hartt
and David G. Wilkins (New York, Abrams, 2003)
Text for site visits: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, by Loren Partridge, Paperback,
2009.
Additional Readings may be given in hand-outs by individual professors throughout the
semester.
All of the assigned Readings should be studied each week in preparation for the class
meetings.
SUGGESTIONS FOR EXTRA READING AND FOR THE RESEARCH PAPER:
Ch. Avery, Florentine Renaissance Sculpture
S. Baldassari and A. Saiber (eds), Images of Quattrocento Florence
E. Borsook, Companion Guide to Florence
B. Cole, The Renaissance Artist at Work
B. Cole, Italian Art 1250-1550
P. Davies, Janson’s History of Art. The Western Tradition, 7th ed., vol. II, chapters 13, 15, 16, 17.
J. Hall, Dictionary of Subjects and Symbols in Art
J. Hall, History of Ideas and Images in Italian Art
F. Hartt, History of Italian Renaissance Art
R. J.M. Olson, Italian Renaissance Sculpture
J.T. Paoletti and G.M. Radke, Art in Renaissance Italy
C.M. Richardson (ed.), Locating Renaissance Art
P.L. Rubin and A. Wright, Renaissance Florence. The Art of the 1470s
A.R. Turner, The Renaissance in Florence
E. Welch, Art and Society in Renaissance Italy
K. Woods (ed.), Making Renaissance Art.
CLASS FORMAT AND ATTENDANCE POLICY:
Class meetings will be divided between classroom lectures and discussions at the school, and
study-visits on site in museums, churches and palaces of Florence. Attendance is required at
all class meetings and site visits; absences and late arrival will be recorded and lower the final
grade.
If 3 class meetings are missed, the student will receive an “F” for the course.
FORM OF ASSESSMENT:
Grades will be composed of evaluations based on the mid-term and final exams, plus one
written paper, to be announced and assigned by the professor. The resulting grades will each
constitute 1/3 of the final grade.
The highest grades will be awarded for work that demonstrates:
-- thorough knowledge of course material
-- critical judgment of views expressed in required Reading and in extra Reading in the case
of the research paper.
-- the capacity to answer questions (on exams) concisely and to the point, with relevant
information to back up the statements made.
FORMAT OF EXAMINATION:
Students will be tested on material presented in class lectures, contained in assigned Readings
or viewed during site trips. Content and format of the examination will be discussed prior to
examination so that students will have a clear idea of procedures.
Examination will comprise the following:
- Terminology
- Slide Identification (name of artist, title of artwork, location, approx. date)
46
- Comparison (essay type answer where two works are compared and contrasted in terms of
medium, style, subject matter, treatment, etc.)
- Questions pertaining to specific works by artists-essay type answer.
SITE VISIT ATTIRE: Appropriate attire must be observed when visiting churches: no bare
shoulders or midriffs; no shorts, no minis.
Mobile phones and electronic devises must be switched off during class periods
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and
they are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE
Week 1
Tues 17 January
Introduction to the course: History of Florence (the Roman Florentia, the mendicant
churches, the building of the new cathedral and the bell tower of Santa Maria del Fiore next to
the Baptistery)
Readings: Hartt, Italy and Italian Art, pp 35-55
The Design of the Campanile, pp 114-115
Sculpture for the Baptistery, pp 122-123
Thurs 19 January
Duomo, Campanile and Baptistery [meet in front of Palazzo Rucellai]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp. 10-15
Further Readings: P. Santini, ed., Documenti dell'Antica Costituzione del Comune di Firenze,
Vol. I, p. 386, in Documenti di Storia Italiana, Tome X (Florence, 1895); reprinted in Roy C.
Cave & Herbert H. Coulson, eds., A Source Book for Medieval Economic History,
(Milwaukee: The Bruce Publishing Co., 1936; reprint ed., New York: Biblo & Tannen, 1965),
pp. 211-212;
Week 2
Tues 24 January
Giotto
Reading: Hartt, Florentine Art of the Early Trecento, pp 93-113
Florentine Painters after Giotto, pp 118-121
Thurs 26 January
Santa Croce and Pazzi Chapel [meet AT 9.20 in front of Santa Croce]
Readings: L. Andrews, Story and Space in Renaissance Art: The Rebirth of Continuous
Narrative, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998, p.120; excerpts from Giovanni Villani, Nuova
Cronica, c.1310; Cennino Cennini, Il libro dell’arte, c.1390, Giorgio Vasari, The Lives,
ed.1550; D. Caldwell, The Sixteenth-Century Italian Impresa in Theory and Practice, AMS
Studies in the Emblem 17, Brooklyn: AMS Press, Inc., 2004, p.11
Week 3
Tues 31 January
Filippo Brunelleschi, Lorenzo Ghiberti
Reading: Hartt, The Beginnings of Renaissance Architecture, pp 181-96
Gothic and Renaissance in Tuscan Sculpture, pp 199-217
Thurs 2 February
Museo dell’Opera del Duomo [meet in front of Museo dell’Opera del Duomo]
47
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp. 22, 25-26; excerpt from G.Vasari,
The Life of Michelangelo, Florentine Painter, Sculptor and Architect (1475-1564), in The
Lives, english transl. of the 1568 edition
Week 4
Tues 7 February
Donatello
Reading: Hartt, Crisis and Crosscurrents; Donatello after 1453, pp 329-342
Thurs 9 February
Or San Michele, The Bargello [meet in front of The Bargello]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp. 22-25, 37-42;
Further Readings: L. Ghiberti, Commentarii, circa 1447-1455, in A documentary history of
art, sel. and ed. by Elizabeth Gilmore Holt, Garden City, NY : Doubleday, 1957, vol.1,
pp.156-158; The life of Brunelleschi, by Antonio di Tuccio Manetti, ed. by Howard Saalman,
English transl. of the Italian text by Catherine Enggass, University Park/Pa. [u.a.] : The
Pennsylvania State University Press, 1970, pp.46,48,50
Week 5
Tues 14 February
Alberti
Readings: Hartt, The Second Renaissance Style, pp 265-291
Absolute and Perfect Painting, pp 293-310
Thurs 16 February
Santa Maria Novella; Palazzo Rucellai [meet in front of Palazzo Rucellai]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp.1-9, 35-36, 75.
Further Readings: Giovanni Rucellai ed il suo Zibaldone. Vol. II: A Florentine Patrician and
His Palace, studies by F.W. Kent, A.Perosa, B.Preyer, P.Sanpaolesi and R.Salvini, intro.
N.Rubinstein (Studies of The Warburg Institute, 24, 2), London: The Warburg Institute,
University of London, 1981, infra; G.Rucellai, Zibaldone, 1473, pp. 121-2 Available at:
http://books.google.it/books?id=SqNxBd8LS20C&lpg=PA306&ots=v6l5Ir2kti&dq=giovanni
%20rucellai%20memoir&hl=en&pg=PA306#v=onepage&q&f=false
excerpts from P. Giovio, Dialogo dell'imprese, 1574
(Available at: http://www.archive.org/details/dialogodellimpre00gi
Week 6
Tues 21 February
Masaccio, Masolino
Reading: Hartt, Masolino and Masaccio, pp 227-243
Thurs 23 February
Brancacci Chapel, Santa Maria del Carmine [meet in front of Santa Maria del Carmine church
at 10:00]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp. 43-50.
Week 7 (27 February – 1 March)
Mid-term Exams
Week 8
Mid-term Break
Week 9
Tues 13 March
48
Fra Angelico, Fra Filippo Lippi
Readings: Hartt, The Heritage of Masaccio, pp 245-263
Thurs 15 Mar
San Marco [meet in front of San Marco church]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp.53-56
Further Readings: The frescoes by Angelico at San Marco, by M. Scudieri, Firenze: Giunti,
2004.
Week 10
Tues 20 March
Andrea del Verrocchio, Sandro Botticelli
Reading: Hartt, Science, Poetry, and Prose, pp 359-397
Thurs 22 March
Gli Uffizi I (emphasis: Botticelli) [meet in front of Uffizi Gallery]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp. 94-97; A. Polizano Le Stanze per la
giostra, 1476-1478, room 99.
Week 11
Tues 27 March
Leonardo
Reading: Hartt, The High Renaissance in Florence, pp 477-501
Thurs 29 March
Gli Uffizi II (emphasis: Leonardo and Michelangelo) [meet in front of Uffizi Gallery]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp.121-123,113-115; excerpts from
Leonardo on Painting. An Anthology of Writings by Leonardo da Vinci, with a Selection of
Documents Relating to his Career as an Artist, edited by Martin Kemp, selected and translated
by Martin Kemp and Margaret Walker, Yale Univ. Press, 2001.
Week 12
Tues 3 April
Michelangelo
Reading: Hartt, Michelangelo to 1505, pp 501-511; pp 525-554
Thurs 5 April
Galleria dell’Accademia [meet in front of Accademia Gallery]
Reading: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp.124, 109-110, 116-117; excerpts from
A. Condivi, Life of Michelangelo, transl. by A.Sedgewick Wohl, Penn State Press, 1976,
2001;
Week 13
Tues 10 April
Michelangelo, continued
Reading: Hartt, High Renaissance and Mannerism, pp 581-604
Thurs 12 April
Medici Chapel [meet in front of San Lorenzo church]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp. 132-138; Michelangelo Buonarroti,
Sonnet for Tommaso de’ Cavalieri, ‘I do not know if it is the very longed-for light’ (‘Non so
se s'è la desiata luce’), c. 1534 / 1546, from M.Buonarroti, Complete Poems and Selected
Letters of Michelangelo, edited by R.N.Liscott, transl. by C.Gilbert, Paperback, 1980
Week 14
Tues 17 April
49
Raphael
Reading: Hartt, Raphael in Perugia and Florence, pp 511-515; 554-579
Thurs 19 April
Palazzo Pitti, Galleria Palatina [meet in front of Palazzo Pitti]
Readings: Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp.121-123, 126.
Week 15
Tues 24 April
Mannerism (Andrea del Sarto, Pontormo, Rosso Fiorentino)
Reading: Hartt, High Renaissance and Mannerism, pp 594-604
Thurs 26 Apr
San Michele in Visdomini church, Annunziata church, St.Felicita Capponi Chapel
Readings: excerpts from Pontormo’s Diary, edited by R.Meyer, London Press Inc., 1983; Art
of Renaissance Florence, 1400–1600, pp.121-123, 126; Art of Renaissance Florence, 1400–
1600, pp.140-141.
Week 16 (May 3-6)
Final Exams
50
Special Topics in Art History: Leonardo
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Michael W. Kwakkelstein, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: a previous course in art history preferred
Site-vistits fee: $150
Email : [email protected]
Office hours after class
COURSE DESCRIPTION
An in-depth study of the drawings, paintings and writings on art of Leonardo da Vinci (14521519). This course seeks to define Leonardo’s development as a painter and as a draftsman.
The student will become familiar not only with Leonardo’s individual masterpieces, but also
with his working methods and multifarious interests. The nature and significance of
Leonardo’s special inventiveness will be assessed through close comparison of his works with
those of his peers and immediate predecessors. The student will gain insight in the design
process of Leonardo’s painted works through attentive analysis of the preparatory drawings.
Leonardo’s drawing and painting practice will be considered in the context of his instructive
notes on painting.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To introduce the student to the art and thought of Leonardo da Vinci and to enable him or her
to understand and appreciate the universality of his genius. The student will learn the
significance of Leonardo’s pioneering research in various branches of knowledge and will
understand how that research relates to Leonardo’s artistic practice and theoretical ideals.
The student will become familiar with the role drawing played not only in the creative
process, but also in the transmission of the vast body of knowledge Leonardo gathered with
the intention to compile illustrated treatises for the benefit of the painter.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Class will meet for 3 hours per week. The course will be a combination of lectures with power
point presentation/discussions in class and guided visits on site in museums in Florence and a
field trip to Milan.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Students will sit a midterm examination and a final examination, and write a term paper with
a 10 minutes-presentation (list of topics and outline term paper will be handed out at the
beginning of the course). Papers are to be 10 pages in length. For details see “Guidelines
writing art history paper” attached to this syllabus.
ATTENDANCE
Attendance will be recorded, and will be factored into your final grade. Two absences must be
justified by a personal note. More than two unjustified absences will lower your grade, unless
a doctor’s note is presented.
No food is permitted in the classroom, or at the sites of study.
Cell phones must be turned off during the class period, in the classroom and at the site.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
51
FORM OF ASSESSMENT
Grades will be composed of evaluations based on a mid-term and final exam, a research
paper, a 10-minute presentation and class attendance/participation. The course will be taught
as a lecture course with frequent group discussions; hence, students are expected to complete
the reading assignments before class and to actively contribute to the class discussion. High
grades will be awarded for work that demonstrates:
-good knowledge of course material
-critical judgment of views expressed in required reading and extra reading for research paper.
-the capacity to answer questions (exams) concisely and to the point.
1. Class attendance and participation
20 %
2. Midterm exam
20 %
3 Research paper and presentation
30 %
4. Final exam
30 %
FORMAT OF EXAMINATION
The midterm exam will include slide identifications (title of artwork, medium, present
location, approx. date), comparisons (between two artworks) and brief essay questions. It will
be based on material covered in the readings and in the lectures both in the classroom and on
the site trips. The final exam will be structured more or less like the midterm exam. To a great
extent it will test material from the second half of the semester, but there will also be a
comprehensive component.
The student will not be tested on any information not found in the textbooks or presented in
class lectures.
REQUIRED READING
-K. Clark, Leonardo da Vinci, introduction by M. Kemp, Penguin Books 1989
-Ch. Nicholl, Leonardo da Vinci. The Flights of the Mind, Penguin Books 2005
FURTHER READING
All books can be found in the Palazzo Rucellai Library.
L.B. Alberti, On painting, (Penguin) Oxford 1991
C. Bambach, Leonardo da Vinci Master Draftsman, cat. exh. New York 2003
D.A. Brown, Leonardo da Vinci. Origins of a Genius, New Haven 1998.
M. Clayton and R. Philo, Leonardo da Vinci. The Anatomy of Man, cat. exh., Houston 1992
M. Clayton, Leonardo da Vinci. A Curious Vision, cat. exh., London 1996
M. Clayton, Leonardo da Vinci. The Divine and the Grotesque, cat. exh., London 2002
R. Goffen, Renaissance Rivals. Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, London 2002.
F. Hartt, History of Italian Renaissance Art: Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.
M. Kemp, Leonardo da Vinci. The Marvellous Works of Nature and Man, London 1989.
M. Kemp, Leonardo da Vinci. Experience, Experiment and Design, Princeton and Oxford 2006
M.W. Kwakkelstein, Leonardo da Vinci as a physiognomist, Leiden 1994
Leonardo on Painting, ed. by Martin Kemp, New Haven and London 1989 (or later editions)
P. C. Marani, Leonardo da Vinci. The Complete Paintings, New York 2000.
Ch. O’Malley and J.B. de C.M. Saunders, Leonardo da Vinci on the Human Body, New York 1982
A.E. Popham, The Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, London 1946 (or later editions)
A.R. Turner, Inventing Leonardo, New York 1993.
F. Zöllner, Leonardo da Vinci. The Complete Paintings and Drawings (Taschen) 2007
IMPORTANT DATES
Monday 27 February
Wednesday 4 April
Friday 16 March
April 30-May (t.b.a.)
Midterm Exam
Deadline Research Paper
Field trip to Milan
Final Exam
52
COURSE TIMETABLE
Week 1: Introduction: Genius defined
Monday 16 Jan.:
Introduction to the course and to Leonardo da Vinci and his
status as universal genius.
Wednesday 18 Jan.:
Film (part I)
Readings:
Vasari, Life of Leonardo, pp. 284-289 (handout); Nicholl, pp.
1-13; 30-37.
Week 2: First Florentine period (1466-1482: I) Leonardo’s art in context; his training as
an artist
Monday 23 Jan.:
Defining the Renaissance and the function and uses of
painting and sculpture at the time.
Readings:
Burke, “The Uses of Works of Art” (handout)
Wednesday 25 Jan .:
Working procedures in the Florentine Renaissance workshop:
Leonardo’s apprenticeship with Andrea del Verrocchio (The
Baptism of Christ).
Readings:
Clark, pp. 37-51; Nicholl, pp. 30-37; 61-98.
Week 3: First Florentine period (1466-1482: II) Leonardo’s earliest paintings
Monday 30 Jan.
The Madonna with the Carnation, the Annunciation, the
Madonna Benois and the Portrait of Ginevra de’Benci
Readings:
Clark, pp. 52-69; Nicholl, pp. 98-114; 131-138
Wednesday 1 Feb.
The St Jerome and the Adoration of the Magi
Readings:
Clark, pp. 71-89; Nicholl, pp. 160-182.
Week 4: First Milanese period (1482-1499: I) Leonardo as a court artist
Monday 6 Feb.:
Leonardo’s departure to Milan. The Madonna of the Rocks,
the Milanese portraits.
Readings:
Clark, pp. 89-107; Nicholl, pp. 185-201; 226-240.
Wednesday 8 Feb.:
Site visit to the Uffizi Museum.
Week 5: First Milanese period (1482-1499: II) Leonardo the scientist
Monday 13 Feb.:
Introduction to his notebooks.
Readings:
Clark, pp. 108-124; Nicholl, pp. 3-9; 209-226.
Wednesday 15 Feb.:
Leonardo and physiognomy: the study of striking faces
Readings:
Nicholl, pp. 260-264.
Week 6: First Milanese period (1482-1499: III): Leonardo as a theorist of art
Monday 20 Feb.:
The ‘Treatise on painting’ and Leonardo’s anatomical studies.
Readings:
Vasari, p. 292; Clark, pp. 125-138 and Nicholl, pp. 240-247;
264-276.
Wednesday 22 Feb.:
Topic paper assigned (with abstract indicating aim, structure
and main sources). Review. Film (Part II).
Week 7: Mid-term Exam
Monday 27 Feb.
Exam
Week 8: Midterm Break:
March 2-11
Week 9: First Milanese period (1482-1499: IV): The Horse and the Last Supper
Monday 12 March.:
The Sforza Monument (‘The Horse’). The Last Supper (Part
I)
Readings:
Vasari, Life of Leonardo, pp. 289-291; Clark, pp. 139-155;
Nicholl, pp. 248-253; 280-285; 292-302.
53
Wednesday 14 March:
Readings:
The Last Supper (Part II)
See above.
Friday 16 March
Field trip to Milan
Week 10: Second Florentine Period (1500-mid 1508: I) The Mona Lisa and other works
Monday 19 March:
The Portrait of Isabella d’Este; the Burlington House
Cartoon of the Virgin and Child with Saint Anne; the
Madonna of the Yarnwinder
Readings:
Vasari, Life of Leonardo, p. 293; Clark, pp. 157-172; Nicholl,
pp. 325-342.
Wednesday 21 March:
The Mona Lisa.
Readings:
Vasari, Life of Leonardo, p. 294; Clark, pp. 172-176;
Nicholl, pp. 361-370.
Week 11: Second Florentine period (1500-mid 1508: II)
Monday 26 March:
The Battle of Anghiari; the Leda, studies of the flight of
birds.
Readings:
Vasari, pp. 294-96; Clark pp. 176-200; Nicholl, pp. 371-382;
389-399.
Wednesday 28 March: Film (Part III).
Week 12: Second Milanese Period (mid 1508-13), Rome and France (1513-19)
Monday 2 April:
The St John the Baptist and the Bacchus
Clark, p. 246-253; Nicholl, pp. 466-474.
Wednesday 4 April:
The Louvre Virgin and Child with St Anne, the Trivulzio
Monument, the Deluge drawings and last anatomical studies.
Readings:
Vasari, pp. 296-298; Clark, pp. 211-246; Nicholl, pp. 403434; 443-453; 457-466.
Week 13: Death and legacy
Monday 9 April:
Wednesday 11 April:
Readings:
NO CLASS
Death in Amboise. Leonardo the man and his legacy.
Clark, pp. 246-258; Nicholl, pp. 466-476; 486-502.
Week 14: Student Presentations
Monday 16 April:
Site visit to Leonardo Museum (via Cavour).
Readings:
Handout on Leonardo as civic and military engineer
Wednesday 18 April:
Presentations.
Week 15: Student Presentations and Review
Monday 23 April:
Presentations
Wednesday 25 April:
Presentations and Review
Week 16: Final exam
To be announced
54
History of Italian Art II: Michelangelo to Bernini
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Anatole Tchikine, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: a previous course in art history preferred
Site-vistits fee: $175
Contact: [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The names of Michelangelo and Bernini exemplify two high points of artistic achievement in
the history of Western civilization. They were also among the key protagonists in the
development of Renaissance and Baroque art, whose work reflected the age that they lived in:
the time of political upheaval and religious conflict, when geographical and scientific
discoveries undermined the familiar world-picture and Europe became divided by religious
differences that shook traditional faith.
This course is an introduction to painting and sculpture in Italy between c. 1500 and c. 1685,
focusing on its major artistic centers: Florence, Venice, and Rome. It traces the main stylistic
and iconographic trends in Italian art through an investigation of specific issues and themes:
the impact of the Counter-Reformation, court culture, decorum and naturalism, the
development of traditional and new genres of painting (altarpieces, portraits, landscapes, and
still-lifes), and illusionistic fresco and sculptural decoration. The works of the leading artists
of the period – Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Caravaggio, Gianlorenzo Bernini, Pietro da
Cortona, and Artemisia Gentileschi – are shown in their historical, religious, political, and
intellectual context.
AIM OF THE COURSE
Students will become familiar with the main centers, monuments, and protagonists of Italian
Renaissance and Baroque art. They will acquire a general understanding of the chronology of
the period and its main stylistic trends and learn to identify and interpret selected works of art
in an appropriate context. The course also aims to promote visual analysis and observation,
encouraging students to articulate and develop their points of view in front of the instructor
and their peers.
REQUIRED READING
H. Hibbard, Michelangelo
H. Hibbard, Bernini
Additional excerpts from selected texts will be e-mailed before each class.
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
C. Avery, Bernini. Genius of the Baroque
C. Avery, Florentine Renaissance Sculpture
B. Cole, The Renaissance Artist at Work
J. Hall, Dictionary of Subjects and Symbols in Art
H. Hibbard, Caravaggio
A. Hughes, Michelangelo
J.R. Martin, Baroque
J. Paoletti and G.M. Radke, Art in Renaissance Italy
B. Talvacchia, Raphael
J. Wilde, Michelangelo
R. Wittkower, Sculpture
R. Wittkower, Gianlorenzo Bernini. The Sculptor of the Roman Baroque
R. Wittkower, Art and Architecture in Italy, 1600-1750
55
Note: when writing your research paper, please make sure you refer to the books in the
Institute’s library. Using internet resources ONLY is not sufficient for obtaining a good grade.
For images, use the Web Gallery of Art: www.wga.hu.
COURSE STRUCTURE AND ATTENDANCE POLICY
The course involves lectures / discussions in class as well as visits to Florentine churches and
museums. THERE IS ALSO A ONE-DAY STUDY TRIP TO VENICE, TAKING PLACE
ON SATURDAY, MARCH 31ST. You are permitted only two unjustified absences. Further
absences without an explanation will result in lowered grades.
Food is not permitted during class. Cell phones must be turned off at all times.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
ASSESSMENT
The course includes two exams (mid-term and final) and a research assignment. Grades are
composed of evaluations based on all three of these assessments as well as class attendance
and participation. In the exams, you will be asked to identify, analyze, or compare paintings,
sculptures, and buildings discussed in class. In addition to this, there will be one or two essay
questions. The research paper should be 1,500-1,700 words long (4-5 double-spaced pages)
and should be printed out or e-mailed directly to [email protected] (in .doc, .docx, or PDF
format). THE SUBMISSION DATE IS TUESDAY, APRIL 3rd.
Your work should demonstrate:
- thorough knowledge of course material, analysis of works of art and buildings
discussed in class
- critical discussion of views expressed in required reading
- ability to develop your argument and present it in a structured form
Original insights, examples, and comparisons are particularly welcome. If you have any
questions or suggestions, e-mail [email protected]
Site visit attire (THIS IS IMPORTANT): You have to be “appropriately” dressed to visit
churches: no bare shoulders or midriffs, no shorts, no minis. Please also no backpacks: these
are not allowed into museums (you could leave them in the Institute’s lockers).
CLASS SCHEDULE
Week 1:
Tue, Jan 17th: Overview, Italian art of the 16th century
Visits: NONE
Reading: NONE
Thu, Jan 19th: Overview, Italian art of the 15th century
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Michelangelo, pp. 11-22
Week 2:
Tue, Jan 24th: Michelangelo’s sculpture
Visits: Accademia
Reading: Hibbard, Michelangelo, pp. 51-61, 85-95
CLASS MEETS IN FRONT OF THE ACCADEMIA
Thu, Jan 26th: The Sistine chapel ceiling
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Michelangelo, pp. 99-143
56
Week 3:
Tue, Jan 31st: Raphael
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Thu, Feb 2nd: The High Renaissance in Florence
Visits: Chiostro dello Scalzo, SS. Annunziata
Reading: to be distributed
CLASS MEETS IN PIAZZA S. MARCO
Week 4:
Tue, Feb 7th: Michelangelo and the Medici
Visits: Medici chapels (S. Lorenzo)
Reading: Hibbard, Michelangelo, pp. 177-202
CLASS MEETS IN FRONT OF THE CHURCH OF S. LORENZO
Thu, Feb 9th: Titian and the High Renaissance in Venice
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Week 5:
Tue, Feb 14th: Tintoretto and Veronese
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Thu, Feb 16th: What is Mannerism?
Visits: S. Felìcita
Reading: to be distributed
Week 6:
Tue, Feb 21st: Florentine Mannerist sculpture
Visits: Bargello, Piazza della Signoria
Reading: Avery, Florentine Renaissance Sculpture, pp. 187-90, 194-210,
251-53
CLASS MEETS IN FRONT OF THE BARGELLO
Thu, Feb 23rd: 16th-century paintings in the Uffizi
Visits: Uffizi
Reading: to be distributed
CLASS MEETS UNDER THE LOGGIA AT THE CORNER OF
THE UFFIZI
Week 7:
Mid-term exam
Week 8:
Mid-term break
Week 9:
Tue, Mar 13th: Overview, Italian art of the 17th century
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Thu, Mar 15th: Caravaggio: the beginnings
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Caravaggio, pp. 29-46
Week 10:
Tue, Mar 20th: Caravaggio: maturity
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Caravaggio, pp. 91-117
Thu, Mar 22nd: Annibale Carracci and the “rebirth” of painting
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
57
Week 11:
Tue, Mar 23rd: The Bolognese school in Rome
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Thu, Mar 29th: Artemisia Gentileschi
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Sat, Mar 31st: STUDY TRIP TO VENICE
CLASS MEETS AT THE PHARMACY INSIDE S. MARIA
NOVELLA TRAIN STATION
Week 12:
Tue, Apr 3rd: Baroque ceiling painting
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Thu, Apr 5th: Baroque frescos in Florence
Visits: Galleria Palatina, Museo degli Argenti
Reading: to be distributed
CLASS MEETS IN FRONT OF PALAZZO PITTI
Week 13:
Tue, Apr 10th: 17th-century paintings in the Uffizi
Visits: Uffizi
Reading: to be distributed
CLASS MEETS UNDER THE LOGGIA AT THE CORNER OF
THE UFFIZI
Thu, Apr 12th: Foreign artists in Rome
Visits: NONE
Reading: to be distributed
Week 14:
Tue, Apr 17th: Bernini’s sculpture
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Bernini, pp. 23-67
Thu, Apr 19th: Bernini at St Peter’s
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Bernini, pp. 68-110
Week 15:
Tue, Apr 24th: Bernini’s fountains
Visits: NONE
Reading: Hibbard, Bernini, pp. 110-25
Thu, Apr 26th: Revision
Visits: Palazzo Medici
Reading: to be distributed
CLASS MEETS IN FRONT OF THE CHURCH OF S. LORENZO
Week 16:
Final exam
58
The Art of Buon Fresco
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Tiziano Lucchesi, M.F.A.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Suggested at least two semesters of studio art or art history
Site visit fee: $ 35
Material fee: est. $ 70
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The studio in which the students have their classes is very similar to the original painting
workshops that one could find in the narrow old streets of Renaissance Florence, and makes
an inspiring setting. The fresco walls are prepared with a bare, rough layer allowing the
students the possibility to work directly in an authentic environment. During the first month
of the semester the students will be able to see and study the ancient techniques of fresco wall
painting that have preceded them over the course of history, starting with prehistoric man and
continuing on to the period of the Egyptians, Greeks,and Romans, with some attention also to
Asiatic and Mesoamerican methods. Students will also acquire some familiarity with the
famous art manuals passed down to us by the ancient masters (Plinio,Vitruvio, Cennino
Cennini and Vasari.). The study of the various steps in the process includes the preparation of
the mortar, of the preparatory drawings and life-size cartoons, of the subdivision into “days’
work”, and of the various pictorial phases of this technique. After the first tries there will be
gradually added more complex projects that students will be able to take home with them.
During the last 2-3 weeks of the semester, when students have mastered the technique, we
will concentrate on a large fresco that will be carried out by the whole group, as in a true
“bottega fiorentina” of the Fifteenth century. The topic of the mural will be realistic, and
once the setting and narrative content is decided, students will design the characters
themselves. Then the life-size drawings and the cutting out of the “cartoons” will be done,
and after the preparation of the mortar and all the materials, each student will paint his/her
character in the portion set up for the “day” (giornate). At the completion of the fresco
students will have participated in the realization of a large original mural in authentic
Fifteenth century fresco technique, and they will be able to make a thorough digital
documentation of their work.
Class will meet for six hours per week in the studio.

Projects: Students will be expected to work through a series of assignments that will
help in becoming familiar with the techniques being studied.

Critiques: Critiques are intended to serve as an open forum for evaluation and
discussion of your work.

Slide Presentations/Site Visits: Slide presentations will address the connections
between class concepts, your work, and art history, while site visits to museums and
galleries will enable students to view the work of the Italian masters.

Readings: Students will be given handouts to assist in learning techniques.
COURSE POLICIES
Headphones will not be permitted during class time.
Turn off your cell phone before coming to class!
GRADING AND ATTENDANCE
Class attendance and participation is crucial to the overall grade.
Students may miss 2 classes without having their grade drop. Each additional unexcused
absence will result in a drop of ½ a letter grade on your final grade. Three late and/or early
departures from class will count as one absence. Consider illness, family emergencies, etc. to
59
be worthy of an excused absence. An excused absence must be accompanied by written
documentation.
GRADING SCALE
A Excellent. Work completed on time with excellence in care and effort. Excellent
attendance and class participation.
B Good, Above Average. Work completed on time in a competent manner with an
above average understanding of photography. Good attendance and class
participation.
C Average. Work completed with an average level proficiency from a beginning level
student.
D Work completed with a minimum of effort. Late or incomplete work.
F Incomplete work, excessive absences, or quality below university level.
GRADE BREAKDOWN
Projects
60%
Class participation
40%
CLASS PARTICIPATION
Students will be expected to attend class regularly, provide required supplies, work diligently
during class, as well as spend the necessary amount of time on projects outside of class. Since
open interchange of ideas are essential to any artist’s development, students are encouraged to
be active participants in each class, and are required to contribute to discussions during formal
group critiques.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
ASSIGNMENTS
Students will be familiarized with materials, techniques and styles through lectures, readings,
demonstrations and critiques and will execute assignments that are in-line with the lecture and
study information. Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the day scheduled for the
critique.
READINGS
Students will be given handouts to assist in learning techniques.
CLASS CONDUCT
All students are requested to take responsibility for personal conduct during class and arrive
on time for each lecture and studio work with proper materials and assignments already
completed and ready to present. Repeated tardiness and failure to complete work on time will
affect final grade.
TEXTS
Primary Sources:
 Cennino Cennini, Craftsman’s Handbook
 Giorgio Vasari, On Technique
General Texts:
- Frederick Hartt, Italian Renaissance Art
- Steffi Roettgen, Italian Frescoes of the Early and High Renaissance, vols. I and II.
- Eve Borsook, The Mural Painters of Tuscany: From Cimabue to Andrea del Sarto
Reserve Texts:
60



Roger Jones and Nicholas Penny, Raphael
F. Mancinelli and G. Colalucci, Michelangelo, The Last Judgment
Ed. P. Boroli and V. Cappellini, La capella Sistina, la volta restaurata
OFFICE HOURS
I am available before and after class.
If you have questions or need to advise me of a pending absence, you can contact me at the
following e-mail address: [email protected]
SCHEDULE
First week
 Tuesday 17 January Presentation and introduction to the artistic techniques to be
examined during the three-part course. Explanation of the tools to be used in the course.
 Thursday 19 January Lecture with video projection on the artistic techniques in use
from prehistory to the sixteenth century.
 Students will begin the process by combining lime, sand, to make the mortar that will
become the first layer of Fresco.  Buying of materials, preparation of walls
 Reading: Cennini, 42-47; Vasari, 212-215; Hartt, 33-40, Roettgen, Vol. I, 9-26
Second week
 Tuesday 24 January Lecture on the types of mortar used in mural art.
 Work day in studio. Students will continue the process by applying the mortar on the tile
that will be used as the support as first work. Preparation of First copy.
 Students will prepare a drawing in black and white to be used for their work, take from
classic masters
 Preparation of the cartoon (preparatory drawing of the same dimensions as the finished
work) that will be used to transfer the design to the wet plaster.
 Preparation of the plaster used for Final coat layer
 Thursday 26 January
 Guided visit to see Florentine frescos.
 Readings: Cennini 47-57; Vasari, 218-221; Hartt, 76-99;Hartt, 104-129
Third week
 Tuesday 31 January Lecture on the buon fresco ( painting characterized by the use of
pigments in water applied to a layer of plaster while it is still wet; when the plaster
hardens, the pigments are encompassed in the crystal structure of the calcium carbonate
that forms and are no longer soluble in water).
 Work day in studio. First day of FRESCO painting about first copy of Giotto di
Bondone.
Students will spread the plaster in which the drawing will be transferred with spolvero or
incised. Transfer of the drawing to the plaster using the technique of spolvero (the
cartoon is poked with holes along the lines of the drawing and then placed over the wet
plaster and dusted with powder; the powder passes through the holes and leaves the
outline of the drawing on the wet plaster) or the technique of incisione (the cartoon is
placed over the layer of wet plaster and a sharp instrument is passed over the lines of the
drawing; when the cartoon is removed, the indentations of the lines remain as a guide).
 Thursday 2 February
 Work day in studio.
 Second day of painting , applying the plaster onto the tiles and then finish painting in all
parts.
61

Readings: Cennini, 20-41; Hartt, 190-212; Roettgen, vol.I, 92-117/Hartt, 213-228 and
310-316; Roettgen, 326-357
Fourth week
 Tuesday 7 February
 Work day in studio
 Discussion and evaluation of finished work.
 Preparations of second copy
 Thursday 9 February
 Second guided visit SANTA MARIA NOVELLA
Fifth week:
 Tuesday 14 February Lecture on organic binders used in the different painting media
and often used on fresco after his drying; the different theories of its beginnings
including a comparison among the techniques used by the Greeks, the Egyptians, and the
Romans (Pliny, Vitruvius, etc.); the paintings of Pompeii.
 Work day in studio. Students will begin the second frescos onto the wall instead tiles,
therefore they will spread the mortar made of lime, sand and marble dust onto the wall
and they will painting on top..
 Thursday 16 February Work day in studio.
 Readings: Cennini, 20-41; Hartt, 190-212; Roettgen, vol.I, 92-117/Hartt, 213-228 and
310-316; Roettgen, 326-357
Sixth week
 Tuesday 21 February Students prepare drawing, cartoon... for third copy about
Masaccio.
 Thursday 23 February Guided visit to CHIESA DEL CARMINE E CAPPELLA
BRANCACCI to see relevant frescoes.
 Readings: Hartt, 344-349; Roettgen, vol.II, 40-55 and 82-201.
Seventh week Mid-term Examination
 Tuesday 28 March EXTEMPORE examinations COPY OF MASACCIO PAINTING
 Thursday 1 March no class

MIDTERM BREAK 2-11 MARCH
Eighth week
 Tuesday 13 March Work day in studio. Students will spread ox glue onto them
frescos,lecture about fresco’s “strappo”
 Thursday 15 March Work day in studio. Students will remove the frescos painting by
the wall thanks to “strappo” technique
 Students will cleaning the back of frescos and apply a new light support.
Ninth week:
 Tuesday 20 March Visit to PALAZZO VECCHIO
 Thursday 22 March Work day in studio. Preparation of general drawing in black and
white about a personal work
Tenth week
 Tuesday 27 March Students will transfer a drawing in big cartoons, one for hic student.
 Thursday 29 March Painting in studio. Transfer big cartoon of general drawing onto
rough layer as “sinopia”
62


Readings Michelangelo: Hartt, 457-468 and 487-506; F. Mancinelli and G. Colalucci,
155-186; Boroli and Cappellini, 80-109
Raphael: Jones and Penny, 49-132; Hartt, 506-534
Eleventh week
 Tuesday 3 April Work day in studio. Painting
 Thursday 5 April Work day in studio. Painting
Twelfth week
 Tuesday 10 April Visit to MUSEO DEGLI ARGENTI
 Thursday 12 April Work day in studio. Painting
Thirthteenth week
 Tuesday 17 April Work day in studio. Painting.
 Thursday 19 April Work day in studio. Painting.
Fourteenth week
 Tuesday 24 April Work Day
 Thursday 26 April Review of the techniques used. / REVIEW FOR EXAM
 Organization and selections for exhibit of the work done by the students. Retouching as
necessary.
 Discussion and evaluation of finished work.
 Exhibitions preparations for STUDENTs ART EXHIBIT
Fifteenth week
Monday 1 May FINAL EXAM AND PAPERS DUE
63
Drawing: The Human Figure
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Tiziano Lucchesi, M.F.A.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site visit fee: $ 40 site visit
Materials and model fee: est. $ 70
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers students the possibility to master the basic notions of anatomical drawing
through the study of classical and Renaissance Florentine sculptures and live models. The
first part is centered on the anatomical study of the male and female figures, and, in the
second part, it will progress toward the incorporation of color according to old masters
techniques.In the first phase students will observe and draw busts, plasters and sculptures in
the various Florentine collections, following the method of the old masters, using the more
familiar drawing techniques with pencil, charcoal, sanguine (iron oxide) and fusaggine. The
classes will include brief theoretical lessons to illustrate human anatomy and to analyse
figures drawn by famous artists in history. Students will then proceed to drawing figures
directly, both in the piazzas of Florence and in the studio with live models. After taking stock
of the results and progress achieved in the first part of the course, there will be the possibility
of continuing towards the desired goals with the use of color, choosing from numerous
ancient and modern techniques. The aim of the course is to prepare students to express their
own artistic creativity after having acquired mastery of the drawing of the human figure.
There will be an end-of-term exhibit, after which students may take there work back with
them.
Class will meet for six hours per week in the studio.
 Projects: Students will be expected to work through a series of assignments that will help
in becoming familiar with the techniques being studied.
 Critiques: Critiques are intended to serve as an open forum for evaluation and discussion
of your work.
 Slide Presentations/Site Visits: Slide presentations will address the connections between
concepts presented in class, your work, and art history, while site visits to museums and
galleries will enable students to view the work of the Italian masters.
 Readings: Students will be given handouts to assist in learning techniques.
COURSE POLICIES
Headphones will not be permitted during class time.
Turn off your cell phone before coming to class!
GRADING AND ATTENDANCE
Class attendance and participation is crucial to the overall grade.
Students may miss 2 classes without having their grade drop. Each additional unexcused
absence will result in a drop of ½ a letter grade on your final grade. Three late and/or early
departures from class will count as one absence. An excused absence (illness) must be
accompanied by written documentation.
GRADING SCALE
A Excellent. Work completed on time with excellence in care and effort. Excellent
attendance and class participation.
B Good, Above Average. Work completed on time in a competent manner with an
64
C
D
F
above average understanding of photography. Good attendance and class
participation.
Average. Work completed with an average level proficiency from a beginning level
student.
Work completed with a minimum of effort. Late or incomplete work.
Incomplete work, excessive absences, or quality below university level.
GRADE BREAKDOWN
Projects
Class participation
60%
40%
CLASS PARTICIPATION
Students will be expected to attend class regularly, provide required supplies, work diligently
during class, as well as spend the necessary amount of time on projects outside of class. Since
open interchange of ideas are essential to any artist’s development, students are encouraged to
be active participants in each class, and are required to contribute to discussions during formal
group critiques.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
ASSIGNMENTS
Students will be familiarized with materials, techniques and styles through lectures, readings,
demonstrations and critiques and will execute assignments that are in-line with the lecture and
study information. Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the day scheduled for the
critique.
TEXTS
Students will be given handouts to assist in learning techniques
Primary Sources:
 Cennino Cennini, Craftsman’s Handbook
 Giorgio Vasari, On Technique
General Texts:
 Frederick Hartt, Italian Renaissance Art
 Steffi Roettgen, Italian Frescoes of the Early and High Renaissance, vols. I and II.
 Eve Borsook, The Mural Painters of Tuscany: From Cimabue to Andrea del Sarto
Reserve Texts:
 Roger Jones and Nicholas Penny, Raphael
 F. Mancinelli and G. Colalucci, Michelangelo, The Last Judgment
 Ed. P. Boroli and V. Cappellini, La capella Sistina, la volta restaurata
OFFICE HOURS
I am available before and after class. I am also in the studio most of the week.
If you have questions or need to advise me of a pending absence, you can contact me at the
following e-mail address: [email protected]
SCHEDULE
First week:
 Tuesdays 17 January Presentation and introduction.
65
Explanation of the tools to be

used in the course.
Lecture with video projection on the artistic techniques in use from prehistory to the
sixteenth century.
Thursdays 19 January Buying of materials, preparation.
Students will begin mainly lines drawing
Second week
 Tuesdays 24 January Lecture on general anatomic drawing. Work day in studio
 Thursdays 26 January Lecture on anatomic skull. Work day in studio, copy of
anatomic head.
Third week
 Tuesdays 31 January Lecture on anatomic arm. Work day in studio .Copy of anatomic
arms.
 Thursdays 2 February guided visit in MUSEO OPERA DEL DUOMO work day,
copy of anatomic arms inside museum.
Fourth week
 Tuesdays 7 February Lecture on anatomic bust Work day in studio, Live model
 Thursdays 9 February guided visit to GABINETTO DEI DISEGNI UFFIZI,
Fifth week
 Tuesdays 14 February Anatomic legs lecture. Copy of a drawing's legs in studio. Live
Model
 Thursdays 16 February guided visit to MUSEO DELL'ACCADEMIA
Sixth week
 Tuesdays 21 February . Model
 Thursdays 23 February. Model
Seventh week/ Mid term examinations
 Tuesdays 28 February extempore in studio with Live Model. review of the student's
anatomic drawings.
 Thursdays 2 February no class
MIDTERM BREAK 2-11 March
Eighth week
 Tuesdays 13 March Lecture on binders used as preparations by older masters,( Cennino
Cennini and Vasari comparison with the oldest and contemporaneous generations.
Work day in studio, preparations of support
 Thursdays 15 March . Live Model
Ninth week:
 Tuesdays 20 March work day in studio
 Thursdays 22 March Guided visit to GIARDINO DI BOBOLI, work day in the park.
Tenth week
 Tuesdays 27 March Work day in studio. Finalization of the museum drawing in studio.
 Thursdays 29 March Lecture on perspective and how it is used to create a drawing.
66
Eleventh week
 Tuesdays 3 March Students will create a drawing using perspective outside.
 Thursdays 5 April Students will finish the drawing and using pencil and charcoal.
Twelfth week
 Tuesdays 10 April Live Model
 Thursdays 12 April Drawing outside
Thirteenth week
 Tuesdays 17 April . Live Model
 Thursdays 19 April Work day
Fourteenth week:
 Tuesdays 24 April Review of drawings
 Thursdays 26 April Organization and selections for exhibit of the work done by the
students. Retouching as necessary.
 Discussion and evaluation of finished work.
Fifteenth week
STUDENT ART EXHIBIT
67
Beginning Oil Painting: Imagery of Florence
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Tiziano Lucchesi, M.F.A.
Credits: 3
Site-Visits fee: $35
Material fee: est. $ 180
Office hours: by appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental materials, techniques, and styles
of oil painting. It is for both beginning art students, as well as for more advanced students
who are new to the technique of oil painting. The course will present and demonstrate the
basic materials used in oil painting, along with fundamentals of drawing and color theory.
Students will be introduced to skills necessary to create painted images while being immersed
in the world of the Florentine landscape, urban sights and historical monuments.
Projects: Students will be expected to work through a series of assignments (both inclass and homework) that will help you to become familiar with the discipline of oil
painting. Part of your work will be from life observation and part will be worked out
with the support of images; In this case ,it is very important that you use the help of
computer and digital camera.
Critiques: Critiques are intended to serve as an open forum for evaluation and
discussion of your work. There will be in formal critiques where we will address both the
positive and negative aspects of your work. This part of the topic can be very important
and stimulating for your work ,acting in a more spontaneous way.
Slide Presentations/Site Visits: Slide presentations will address the connections
between class concepts, your work, and different masters of oil painting techniques,
some site visits to museums and galleries will enable students to view – first hand – the
various styles of paintings .
Readings: Students will be given handouts to assist in learning techniques in oil
painting, drawing, and color theory.
Handouts:
The artist handbook of materials and techniques: Ralph Mayer.
The materials of the artist and their use in painting:Max Doerner.
The craftsman's handbook."Il libro dell'arte": Cennino Cennini. Edited by Dover.
COURSE POLICIES
 Headphones will not be permitted during class time.
 Eating and speaking loudly is not admitted during class time.
GRADING AND ATTENDANCE
Class attendance is crucial to the overall grade.
Students may miss 2 classes without having their grade drop. Each additional unexcused
absence will result in a drop of ½ a letter grade on your final grade. Three late and/or early
departures from class will count as one absence. Consider illness, family emergencies, etc. to
be worthy of an excused absence. An excused absence must be accompanied by written
documentation.
GRADING SCALE
A Excellent. Work completed on time with excellence in care and meaning, and
demonstrated effort. Excellent attendance and class participation.
B Good, Above Average. Work completed on time in a competent manner with an
above average understanding of techniques . Good attendance and class participation.
68
C
Average. Work completed with an average level proficiency from a beginning level
student.
D Work completed with a minimum of effort. Late or incomplete work.
F Incomplete work, excessive absences, or quality below university level.
GRADE BREAKDOWN
Class participation
Projects
Class works
30%
40%
30%
CLASS PARTICIPATION
Students will be expected to attend class regularly, provide required supplies, work diligently
during class, as well as spend the necessary amount of time on projecting and practicing
outside of class. Since open interchange of ideas are essential to any artist’s development,
students are encouraged to be active participants in each class, and are required to contribute
to discussions during formal group critiques.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies.
PROJECTS
Students will be familiarized with materials, techniques and styles through lectures, readings,
and information. Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the day scheduled for the
consign late assignments will be not accepted and students working on more complicate
projects can be excused showing their work in progress .
Projects/Topics Studied
1. Introductory Techniques of oil painting and drawing: There will be a theoretical and
practical lesson of basic oil painting and volumetric drawing techniques., as well an
introduction to life drawing and 2-D transfer techniques. Materials, mixing, value,
measurement, line, and space and will be stressed.
Black and White Studies
 Quick study painting from a still life (With charcoal)
 Long Study still life to paint from observation.( In black and white oil paint)
 Black and White Reproduction of a 2-d image(As homework, in charcoal)
Urban landscape in black and white.
2. Introduction to Color theory. We will discuss the color wheel, color combinations in
order to gain many different results, modulation of lines and textures as well as rendering
form and space through color. We will also begin an ongoing discussion of specific and
related examples of painters from the Renaissance through the 20th century in a study of
composition and color. Our assignment will be paired with a museum visit to view if possible
some of the discussed masterworks.
Color Variations on Reproducing reality and art masterworks
 Monochromatic
 Complementary
 Analogous
 Full Colour
3. Introduction to techniques of perspective. One and two point perspective will be taught
along with sighting and aerial perspective. There will be a continuing discussion on Italian
painters who have focused on architecture and landscape in their work. We will continue to
work on composition, quality of light, measurement, and painting technique. Weather
permitting, class will be held outside or with 2d image sources.
69
We will also begin to explore incorporating ‘concept’ or idea within your artwork by
conveying a theme. We will discuss ‘what’ you are painting about, as well as review the
themes/concepts of some specific artists. This segment of the course will be paired with a visit
to a contemporary art gallery.
Materials List:
Oil Paints (37mm tubes – with the exception of Titanium white)
Acrylic Paints
An assortment of “longs”, “filberts”, and “rounds”. *be sure you’re purchasing Oil brushes
– Quickens drying time, increases flow and transparency.
– Slows drying time. Improves flow and increases transparency.
a
Paints: $ 65
Brushes: $ 30
Canvases: $ 65
Misc painting supplies: $ 60
Approximate Supply cost: $ 210
**be aware that students use materials at very different rates. Some may need to purchase
more replacement paints and materials than others
ART SUPPLY STORES
Zecchi Art Supply Store
Via Della Studio, 19r (just off Borgo Albizi)
Salvini, piazza degli artisti angolo via Alfani.
Rigacci, via dei Servi.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
COURSE OUTLINE
 Week One
Jan 16
Course Introduction and syllabus review.
Introduction to Oil Painting Materials. Presentation and
introduction to the artistic techniques to be examined during the
course. Explanation of the tools to be used.
70


Week Two
Week Three
Jan 18
.Brief preparatory study of a still life in charcoal.(Study of
surfaces)
To finish As Homework : Create with charcoal a value scale due
to create one everyday object in chiaroscuro study (Black and
White)
Jan 23
Brief slide show analysis of samples of images necessary for
the class topics. Start to transfer the drawing for a black and white
still life composition. Long Study Black and White Stylise from
(Charcoal)
Introduction on 2-D transfer techniques of the chosen
object.(Working in scale or direct method)
\]Paint the still life in black and white.
As homework: Select a black and white picture as (portrait or
urban landscape.)
Jan 25
Go ahead with the paintings.
Jan 30
Long Study Still Life painting (continued).
Feb 1
Works on process

Week Four
Feb 6
Visit :GALLERIA DEGLI UFFIZI
Lecture on Preparations -Old master technique
Homework assignment:, draw in pastels one landscapes or urban
sight (from life) 35x50 cm..(plus the images printed in colour on
cheap paper.
Feb 8
Preparation on wood panel following the old Italian manner hand
down by the ancient masters.
Bring in images by a painter or from a photograph that you would
like to study, detail and possibly in realistic style.
Start working on your image.
Copy of the masterpiece started

Week Five
Feb 13
Copy of the masterpiece (continued)

Week Six
Feb 15
Copy continued .
Feb 20
Go ahead with the project.
Feb 22
Finish and clean up your works.

Week Seven
Feb 27
Mid term review.(Bring all the works you have done.)
Conclusion of your works and critique and advices Drawing
session ,exercise on human head…from anatomical books.
71
Transfer drawings on oil paint papers.
March 2
No class

Week Eight
Mid term break
No Classes – Midterm

Week Nine
March 12
Colour Theory painting of full colour technique.(Slide show
demonstration.)
Atmosphere in your painting. (Experimenting with different
texture on paper. preparing the soft ground of your canvas.)
As homework, draw some portraits or urban scenes,
on the prepared papers.

Week Ten

Week Eleven

Week Twelve

Week Thirteen

Week Fourteen
From March 2 to March 11.
March 14
Visit: GALLERIA D'ARTE MODERNA DI PALAZZO
PITTI
March 19
Go ahead with the painting .
Full Colour Theory painting Bring in images of everyday life in
Florence that you would like to study, it should be full of detail
and possibly in realistic style.
March 21
work on image (continued)
March 26
work on image (continued)
March 8
work on image (finish)
April 2
Lecture on Perspective, Composition and Space.
Drawing a composition at the corner of a room or streets Begin
Plain air, Tuscan landscape/Florentine Cityscape painting (on site
– weather permitting) size of canvas: 50 x 50 cm, 35 x 50 cm.
April 4
work on image (continued)
April 9
NATIONAL HOLYDAY (EASTER MONDAY)
April 13
Full Colour Theory painting ,working from sketches and copies
doing your personal composition as final work.
April 16
Go ahead with the projects.
April 18
painting (continued)
72

Week Fifteen
April 23
Monday 25 April
Personal subject (continued)
Finish and clean up your works. ,Start setting up your elaborate
for the final students show.

Week Sixteen
April 30
Review and Selection of your work( for eventual exposition)
Advices on giving a professional look to an art piece
Final critique and review.
*This is a general guideline for the class schedule and is subject to change depending on
factors such as unexpected weather conditions and class priority.
73
Introduction to Photography: Portfolio of Florence
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Gloria Marco Munuera
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 4
Prerequisite: None
Site Visit fee: $ 35
Material fee: est. $ 120
Office hours: by appointment
Email: [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will offer students a foundation in one of the most diffused media of the
contemporary world: photography. Students will be immersed in the world of imagery by
walking tours in the Florentine landscape including urban sights and historical monuments.
Florence is an ideal city for photographic imagery. The city contains some of the most
irreplaceable works of art as well as being situated within a diverse moving architecture and
unforgettable Tuscan landscapes. Students will focus on beginning digital photographic
techniques including professional portfolio presentation and creative thinking.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
An objective of the course is to gain knowledge of the basics about shooting color and black
and white images with DSLR (digital single lens reflex) cameras. The class members will
leave the course being confident in knowing how to use their camera, how to correct an image
through Adobe Photoshop software and having produced a professional portfolio that
discovered their personal imagery journey of the Florence. The students will improve the
ability to creatively, interpret and criticize the photographic image and develop the ability to
think critically about pictures they see. Using the Florentine environment, students will
experience a new culture through the medium of photography and its digital processes. By the
end of the course, they will have developed an understanding of their own photographic
language, and have acquired a more critical eye.
ATTENDANCE
Students are required to attend all classes. One unexcused absence is allowed; grades will be
reduced by one (full grade) each successive unexcused absence (i.e. B- becomes C-). Three
late arrivals to class equal one absence.
• No traditional film based or automatic cameras may be used.
• Mobile phones and every kind of electronic devices must be turned off during class time
except when working on Photoshop.
ASSIGNMENTS
Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the day scheduled for the critique. Failing to
shoot the required amount of images adversely affect your overall grade (even if you hand in
the required number of prints).
PROJECT
The course culminates with the student presenting a final portfolio with 10 printed and well
presented images. Important attention will be given to the images as part of a photographic
series, rather than as just stand-alone images. Final prints could be presented in either black
and white or color.
74
READINGS ASSIGNMENTS
The reading assignments will be given weekly before class. These will be on technical,
theoretical and philosophical issues about introduction to photography.
GRADING
It is very difficult to produce good work by cramming the night before it is due. Work process
and progress counts as much as a final product.
A Excellent
Indicates work of a very high character. This grade is reserved for work that shows
inspiration, demonstrating significant insight developed to its fullest extent and presented with
exquisite
craftsmanship.
Strongly
exceeding
requirements
of assignments. Growing level of improvement. Strong positive attitude toward the work.
B Good, above average
Indicates work that is definitely above average. This level of work shows thorough
exploration and development, and is well presented with good craftsmanship, but it may not
rise to the highest level of excellence. Improvement showing marks of progress. Work is
accurate and complete. Positive attitude towards the work.
C Average
Indicates work of average or medium character. Mediocre or conservative performance,
satisfying all requirements of assignments with a neutral and ordinary level of initiative and
attitude.
D/F Fail
Indicates that the student knows so little of the subject that his/her work cannot be accepted.
Work in this category may be unfinished, unimaginative, undeveloped or poorly executed,
and shows minimal understanding of issues. Level of initiative, attitude and improvement
non-existent.
30% of your grade will be based on Final Portfolio
20% of your grade will be based on Mid-Term Grade.
20% of your grade will be based on Final Exam.
20% of your grade will be based on assignments.
10% of your grade will be based on critiques and class participation.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
REQUIRED MATERIALS
Art courses require overall time and extra money for supplies. In this photography course you
are expected to print only enlargements for the Mid-term and Final Portfolio. Students will
also be expected to buy the materials required in order to mount the final portfolio.
An estimated cost for the entire semester considering all the materials and lab costs is 100
Euro
Notice that from a set of photographs captured you will not be able to use all the images,
progressively you will be expected to select your best shots. The images you photograph are
going to be used as a sketchbook for your visual education.
Students must be equipped with:
- SLR Reflex Digital camera with ‘Manual’ function and with at least one lens
(manual of instructions for camera, if possible) The amount of Megapixels is not
important.
- The cameras USB cable
- A memory card (1 G card is suggested)
75
- A card reader compatible with your camera
- A battery charger and an extra battery for your camera
- A laptop computer with Adobe Photoshop
- An external hard disk or USB of good capacity
- Matting cardboard for final portfolio (this would be announced)
RECOMMENDED BIBLIOGRAPHY
AZOULAY, P. (1998) The Adventure of Photography - 150 Years of the
Photographic Image.
BARTHES, R. (2000) Camera Lucida, London, Vintage.
CHILD, J. (2006) Studio Photography, essential skills, New York, Focal Press.
CLARKE, G. (1997) The Photograph: a Visual and Cultural History, New York, Oxford University Press.
HORENSTEIN, H. (1983) Black and White Photography, a Basic Manual, Second Edition, New York, Little,
Brown and Company.
JUSSIM, E. (1989) The Eternal Moment: Essays on the Photographic Image, New York, Aperture.
KOETZLE, H.-M. (2003) Photo Icons: the history behind the pictures, Taschen.
LANGFORD, M., ANDREWS, P. (2009) Langford’s Starting Photography: the guide to creating great images,
Oxford, Focal Press.
MITCHELL, W. J. (1994) The reconfigured eye: visual truth in the post-photographic era, Cambridge, Mass.,
MIT Press.
PETERSON, B. F. (2003) Learning to see creatively, Design, Color and Composition in Photography, New York,
Amphoto Books.
SONTAG, S. (1977) On Photography, New York, Picador USA.
PHOTO STORES AND LABS
NEW PHOTO RAPIDA tel.055-280414
Via Nazionale 77 r (close by S.M.N. Train Station)
Open 9:30am to 7pm Monday to Friday, 9a.m to 1 pm Saturday
BONGI FOTO OTTICA tel. 055-2398972
Via Por Santa Maria, 82 R
www.otticabongi.com
OTTICA FONTANI tel. 055-47098
Viale Strozzi 18 R
FOR CAMERA REPAIRS
PUNTO REFLEX tel.055-353733
Via Ponte di Mezzo 16 R
SCHEDULE
Tues. Jan. 17: Introduction to the course. Syllabus review. Questionnaire. Introduction to all
the equipment. Basics of the camera, its parts and their functions. Focusing.
Exposure basics. Aperture and speed. Correct exposure. Power point
presentation.
Thurs. Jan. 19: Light and its qualities. Underexposure and Overexposure. Bracketing.
Photography examples. Sensibility (A.S.A/I.S.O characteristics). White
balance on SLR Camera.
Visit to Photo-Lab where purchase missing materials (if necessary)
For next class: Reading Assignment #1
Tues. Jan. 24: Quiz on exposure (reading assignment #1)
Walking-tour: Assignment #1 (part A): “Correct Exposure/ Space and
Depth” Shooting 20 images. How to download images into the computer.
Hand in Assignment n1 (part A) in USB.
76
Thurs. Jan. 26: Resolution of a digital image. Tools in Photoshop. Histogram. Digital
exposure. Layers. Optimising tonality, brightness and contrast. Postproduction: Demo on image correction.
Assignment #1 (part B): Exercise: correction of images from assignment n1.
For next class: Reading Assignment #2
Tues. Jan. 31: Quiz on Reading Assignment #2
Hand in Assignment n1 (part B) in USB.
Walking-tour: Assignment #2: “Abstract Shapes and Patterns/ Textures”
Shooting 30 photographs.
Thurs. Feb. 2: Lab Day: Post-production: working on images Assignment #2. Critique
Assignment #1.
Tues. Feb. 7: Basics of composition in an image. Rule of thirds.
Video: Language of Photography
Critique Assignment #2
Walking-tour: Assignment #3: “Shadows and Composition”
Shooting 30 images
Reading Assignment #3
Thurs. Feb. 9: Lab Day: working on Assignment #3
Critique on Assignment #3
Digital show: “Masters of Photography”
Tues. Feb. 14: Walking-tour: Assignment #4 part A: “Contrast between Landscape/Nature
photography and Buildings/Interior photography”
Location: Palazzo Pitti and Boboli Garden
Reading Assignment #4
Thurs. Feb. 16: Walking-tour: Assignment #4 part B: Contrast between Landscape/Nature
photography and Buildings/Interior photography
Location: Piazzale Michelangelo
Tues. Feb. 21: Critique on Assignment #4 (part A and B)
Introduction to Mid-term Project, “Stopping or Freezing Action/ Motion and
Blur ”
Power point presentation: Capturing static and movement
Hand off Paper Topic for Mid-term
Reading Assignment #5
Thurs. Feb. 23: Review for Mid-term Exam.
Digital preparation of files to print.
How to add a border and margin for printing.
Individual critiques for Mid-term.
Mon. Feb 27 – Thurs. March 1: Mid-term Exams Week
Mid-term theory Exam.
Mid-term paper: “Analysis and Contrast of two images”
Mid-term exam: 6 prints portfolio presentation (3Motion & 3
Action)
March 2nd-11th: Mid-term Break
77
Frozen
Tues. March 13: Review of exam. Digital show: History of photography
Research assignment: on a photographer
Thurs. March 15: Color Temperature. Power point presentation
Walking tour into a park: Assignment n5:”Capturing creative light”
30 photographs
Reading Assignment #6
Tues. March 20: Field trip to Fiesole: Assignment n6: “Photographing Strangers, Faces and
Portraits” (60 photographs)
Thurs. March 22: Critique on Assignment n5 (6 digital corrected images)
Post-production Demo: eyes and skin color correction, partial focus and
masks in Photoshop.
Tues. March 27: Fratelli-Alinari Archive
Thurs. March 29: Critique on Assignment n6 (6 color & 6 B/W corrected images)
Reading Assignment #7
Students presentation on a photographer’s work
Tues. April 3: Introduction to Final Project: “Portfolio of Florence”
color or b/w
Field Work A: “Portfolio of Florence”.
Students presentation on a photographer’s work
Thurs. April 5: Field Work B: “Portfolio of Florence”.
Reading Assignment #8
Students presentation on a photographer’s work
Tues. April 10: Field Work C: “Portfolio of Florence”.
Students presentation on a photographer’s work
Thurs. April 12: Demo on Portfolio Preparation
Portfolio material: visit to Rigacci
Reading assignment #9
Tues. April 7: Final Portfolio preparation+ Individual Critiques
Thurs. April 19: Final Portfolio preparation+ Individual Critiques
Preparation for Students Exhibition
Review for Final Exam
Tues. April 24: Final Portfolio preparation+ Individual Critiques
Thurs. April 26: Final Portfolio preparation+ Individual Critiques
Mon. April 30 - Thurs. May 3: Final Exams Week
Final Exam Theory/slides + Final Portfolio
Students Exhibition
• Disclaimer: This schedule could be modified depending on class rhythm or unexpected
weather conditions.
78
Ancient Rome: Civilization and Legacy
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Erika Bianchi, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Site visit fee: $ 180
Prerequisite: none
Email: [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman world, from the Rome’s
beginnings in myth and legend through its rise to domination of the Mediterranean world, its
violent conversion from a Republic to an Empire, and the long success of that Empire down
to its collapse in the fifth century A.D. The first part of the semester will focus on the
development of Roman institutions and political system, while the second will be devoted to
the social structure of the Roman Empire and the daily life of its people. As we search
together to unravel the historical significance of the Roman achievement, we will look at
Roman literature and religion, art and architecture, and philosophy. When possible, we will
give a privileged place to primary sources in translation, letting the characters of this great
historical drama speak for themselves. Our readings will be supplemented by slides and
videos, site visits to Roman vestiges in Florence and a two-days field trip to Rome.
OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this course, students should:
 Define and master the basic events of Roman History, from the foundation of Rome to
the fall of the Empire
 Become familiar with the daily life, values and social attitudes of the ancient Romans
during the Republic and early centuries of the Empire
 Trace the origins of many aspects of Western European culture and of modern Western
society in general
 Gain understanding of the political, religious and intellectual heritage of Roman society
and use it as a means of interpreting the human experience through history
 Recognize and understand how much of the English language is affected by Latin
vocabulary
 Be able to translate historical knowledge from the narrow focus of the course to the
much wider context of being active and acquainted citizens of today’s world.
REQUIRED BOOKS
E. Bianchi, Ancient Rome, Civilization and Legacy CLASS READER ( = RR)
REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING
1. ATTENDANCE AND CLASSROOM CONDUCT. Because there is a close correlation
between class attendance and satisfactory performance, the student is expected to come to
class. Being present means being on time for class. Cell phones and other noise-making
electronics must be turned off. Students are not allowed to use their laptops during class.
2. ASSIGNMENTS AND PARTECIPATION. Participation in class discussions is strongly
encouraged; preparation is expected and required for every class. The reading assignments
will be of fundamental help in the full comprehension of the lecture topics.
3. FIELD TRIP TO ROME. Students will be required to participate in an overnight class field
trip to Rome (Section 1: Friday February 24 and Saturday, Feb 25; section 2: Saturday, Feb
25 and Sunday, Feb 26). The trip will be carefully prepared in class: archaeological sites,
79
monuments and works of art in general will be surveyed beforehand in a lecture-slide format
with some discussion.
4. TAKE-HOME QUESTION. The take-home exam question, due on the last week of term, is
designed to encourage students to analyze critically the historical events we have studied and
to draw conclusions about these events. Students will have the opportunity to pick one of two
questions about major issues of historical interpretation. By writing the essays at home, they
will be able to analyze material relevant to the exams in a setting where memorization and
time limits will not be critical to their performance.
5. QUIZZES AND EXAMS.
Major Exams; a mid-term (Week 7, last week of February) and a final (Week 15, between
April 30 and May 3). The general format of the mid-term exam will be multiple choice, fillin-the-blanks, matching short answer, maps, plans and slides identification. The mid-term
exam will include questions on the topics covered in the first half of term.
The general format of the final exam will be 60% multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks,
matching short answers, maps, plans, texts and slides identification; 40% essays. The final
exam will be rather comprehensive, although focusing mainly on the topics of the second half
of term. The examinations will be designed to allow students to demonstrate their
comprehension of the basic concepts of the course.
Emperors Quiz: a 30-minute quiz on a multiple choice, fill-in the blanks, slides identification
format, will be held on meeting 19 (March 28).
5. MAKE-UP POLICY. Exam extension requests will not be honoured. The only good reason
to be unable to attend class the day an exam is due is illness, attested by a physician’s note. In
any other case, the exam grade will be entered as an F. If you miss an exam because you are
ill, you can make up for it by writing a paper about some aspect of Roman history. The exact
subject of the paper and the extra-readings required for it will be agreed upon and discussed
with me.
FORM OF ASSESSMENT
Attendance and Class Participation
15%
Midterm Exam
25%
Emperors Quiz
20%
Take home question
20%
Final Exam
20%
I am more than willing to answer any questions at any time, and students are strongly
encouraged to contact me by e-mail or ask for a special appointment if they have problems
with the lectures or the assignments or if they have questions of any kind about the topics we
will deal with.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE OF CLASS MEETINGS AND TOPICS
Although we will try to follow the syllabus strictly, in some cases the schedule and the
contents of the lectures and assignments may be changed so as to better fit the students’ needs
and interests. Thus, it will always be the students’ responsibility to make sure what will
be actually covered in class; if you miss a class, it is up to you to find out about the
lecture, the assignment or the handout given out that day.
80
Week 1
Meeting 1 (M, Jan 16) Introduction to course and syllabus. Sources for Roman History.
People and cultures of primitive Italy.
Assignment: RR 7-8 Who were the Etruscans?; 10-15 (The Foundation and the Regal
Period).
Meeting 2 (W, Jan 18) The foundation of Rome: Romulus and the seven kings. Video:
Rome, power and glory, chapter 1, The Rise, episodes 2-3.
Assignment: RR 30-31 (Patrons and clients); 32-43 (Freedom and the struggle for
existence + The conquest of Italy).
SECONDARY BIBLIOGRAPHY: Roman Religion (RR 23-29 and Appendix 1)
Week 2
Meeting 3 (M, Jan 23) The Early Republic: political institutions and military expansion.
Assignment: RR 48-57 Polybius on the Republican System
Meeting 4 (W, Jan 25) Polybius and the Founding Fathers: SPQR and the USA Constitution.
Assignment: RR 58-64 Rome on the Way to World Power; 72-74 (Imperialism +
Letter of Mithridates on Roman Expansion).
SECONDARY BIBLIOGRAPHY: Polybius, Cornelius Nepos and Livy on Hannibal,
RR 65-71.
Week 3
Meeting 5 (M, Jan 30) The Punic and Macedonian wars, Imperialism and the great conquests
of the 2nd century BC.
Assignment: RR 76-83 (From the Gracchi to Caesar).
Meeting 6 (W, Feb 1) The Republican crisis: the 1st century BC reform of the army and the
rise of conflicting ambitions.
Assignment: RR 93-94 Leonardo Bruni’s account on The Origins of Ancient
Florence; 95-101, Caesar.
SECONDARY BIBLIOGRAPHY: RR 88-92.
Week 4
Meeting 7 (M, Feb 6) The origins of ancient Florencia.
Meeting 8 (W, Feb 8) From Republic to Empire: Julius Caesar, Octavian, Marc Antony and
the collapse of the Roman Republic.
Assignment: 109-113 The Age of Augustus; 114-119 (Antony and Cleopatra); 129136 (Accomplishments of the Deified Augustus).
Week 5
Meeting 9 (M, Feb 13) The Augustan Principate: literature, art and the power of images in
the new Roman Empire
Assignment:. RR 122-28 (Formation of the Principate); 138-40 (Horace and Virgil
on Augustus’ settlement).
SECONDARY BIBLIOGRAPHY: RR 120-21 (Virgil VIII, 626-731).
Meeting 10 (W, Feb 15) Art and architecture under Augustus: the Ara Pacis, Augustus’
statues and the Imperial Forums.
Week 6
Meeting 11 (M, Feb 20) The Roman Forum, the Colosseum, the Pantheon.
Meeting 12 (W, Feb 22) Review class.
Friday-Saturday, Feb 24-25, and Sat-Sun, Feb 25-26:
FIELD TRIP TO ROME!
81
Week 7
Meeting 13 (between Feb 27 and 29): MIDTERM EXAM.
Assignment: RR 148-153 (The Julio Claudians).
MARCH 2nd - 11th : MIDTERM BREAK
Week 8
Meeting 14 (M, March 12) Rome under the Emperors: Julio Claudians. Video Rome Power
and Glory, Seduction of Power, chpt. 5-6.
Assignment: 163-64 (The Flavians); 154-161 (Evil Emperors + The Big Fire of
Rome).
Meeting 15 (W, March 14) The Flavians.
Assignment: RR 167-71 (Juvenal, Satire 3); 174-77 (Aelius Aristeides’ Regarding
Rome).
Week 9
Meeting 16 (M, March 19) The Pax Romana: Tacitus and the golden age under the Antonine
Emperors. Nerva and the principle of adoption.
Assignment: RR 178-83.
Meeting 17 (W, March 21) The “Spanish dynasty”: Trajan and Hadrian. Video Rome Power
and Glory disc 2, Grasp of Empire, Erecting an Empire.
Assignment: RR 188-191 (Hadrian).
Week 10
Meeting 18 (M, March 26) The “French dynasty”: Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius, Lucius
Verus and Commodus.
Meeting 19 (W, March 28) Quiz on Roman Emperors.
Week 11
Meeting 20 (M, April 2) Roman love and sexuality. Aristophanes’ speech on the nature of
love.
Meeting 21 (W, April 4) Introduction to the Roman familia. Roman marriage (and divorce).
The life of Roman women.
Week 12
Meeting 22 (M, April 9) Easter Monday, Institute closed.:
Meeting 23 (W, April 11) Children (and education); slaves and freedmen
Week 13
Meeting 24 (M, April 16) Life in ancient Rome: daily routine, entertainment and leisure.
Assignment: RR 211-216: Seneca ad Lucilium XLVII. 220-240: K. Hopkins, A
World Full of Gods, London 1999, chapter 1 (Time-travel in pagan Pompeii).
Meeting 25 (W, April 18) Pompeii and the 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius. Life in the city of
Pompeii Assignment: RR 241-244 (Pliny’s letters).
Week 14
Meeting 26 (M, April 23): Documentary video: Pompeii, The Day a City died.
Assignment: RR 250-261 (Reconstruction + Eternal Rome).
Meeting 27: (W, Apr 25) The fall of Rome. Video: Rome, Power and Glory, chapter 6, The
Fall.
Conclusions and review.
Week 15
FINAL EXAM week (May 2-5).
82
Archaeology and Art of Ancient Italy
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Erika Bianchi, Ph.D.
Carolina Megale, PhD
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Site visit fee: $ 275
Prerequisite: none
Email: [email protected], [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is intended to provide an overview of Ancient Italy from the 8th century B.C.E. to
the 5th century C.E. as interpreted through archaeology, the study of past cultures and
societies through their material remains. We will explore different varieties of archaeology
and examine theory, methods, and techniques for investigating and reconstructing the past; we
will then examine the material evidence for key areas of ancient Italy such as Etruria and the
Roman Empire, dealing with not only the artefact remains but also important social, cultural
and economic issues. Architecture, sculpture, fresco painting, and the minor arts will be
examined at such sights as Volterra, Populonia, Rome and Pompeii, and the nature of
archaeological evidence will be related to other disciplines such as Art History and History.
The course will be both a practicum in archaeology and a history course, team-taught by an
archaeologist and a historian to allow students to learn each aspect of the course material from
an expert in the field. Classes will be experimental and dynamic, and will be made of a
combination of in-class lectures, field trips, site visits to museums and archaeological digs in
Tuscany and elsewhere. Major emphasis throughout the course will be given to the Etruscan
cities of Volterra and Populonia and the Roman cities of Florentia (Florence) and Pompeii.
OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
 describe the basic archaeological skills: how to locate, record, investigate, analyze
and interpret archaeological sites;
 discuss critically archaeology's social relevance: connections of past human systems
and adaptations with today's world;
 analyze details of some of the main ancient Mediterranean cultures, describing major
transitions in their history and how this knowledge is important for modern humans
and interpreted differently by different interest groups;
 describe not only specific case studies but general archaeological and historical
principles relating to real-world problem solving, in a practical application of
knowledge from the human past;
 demonstrate good communication skills: written, oral, visual and interactive, to
understand and tell the story of the past.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Class Participation: Classes include lectures, discussions, slide presentations, museum visits
and field trips. Note-taking and attendance are required. Thoughtful participation in class
discussion and activities will make the course more enjoyable and rewarding for all of us.
Exams: There will be two exams, a midterm and a final. Both include images, plans and keyterms identification, multiple choice, fill in the blanks, matching short answers and essay-type
questions, and each will cover assigned readings for that time period as well as lectures and
other class materials. The final exam will be cumulative to a small degree in that students will
83
need to know the basic concepts of archaeology to interpret the record of Roman history.
There will be NO makeup exams except in fully documented serious circumstances.
Museum/site review: During the course of term students will have to write a 4-6 page report
on one of the museums or archaeological sites listed below. Depending on the number of
students and the composition of the class, they will work individually, in pairs or in groups.
After choosing the musem/site, students will schedule a visit on their own to one of the
following places of interest:
 Populonia, Archaeological Park of Baratti and Populonia, ph. [+39] 0565 226445.
Email: [email protected] , www.parchivaldicornia.it
 Arezzo, National Archaelogical Museum “Gaio Cilnio Mecenate”, Via Margaritone,
10 – ph. [+39] 0575 20882, [email protected]
 Siena, National Archaeological Museum, Piazza Duomo, ph. [+39] 0577 534511,
www.santamariadellascala.com, [email protected]
 Luni, Archaeological Area and National Archaeological Museum, Via S. Pero, 39,
(Ortonovo
–
La
Spezia)
ph.
[+39]
0187
66811,
www.archeoge.arti.beniculturali.it
FORM OF ASSESSMENT
Attendance and Participation
Midterm Exam
Museum/site review (4-6 page essay)
Final Exam
20%
25%
25%
30%
CLASS POLICY
Cheating and other academic dishonesty are dealt with severely, according to IPR policy.
Respectful behaviour in the classroom is required: do your errands, phone calls, and pit stops
before class; turn off cell phones; do not arrive late, leave early, or otherwise disrupt the class.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
REQUIRED TEXTS
Class reader including a collection of readings taken from archaeology textbooks (see list
below); primary sources in translation; guides, descriptions and catalogues of the
archaeological sites and museums visited during the term; maps, outlines and archaeological
reconstructions.
READINGS
AA.VV., 2002, The Ancient Ships of Pisa. A European Laboratory for Research and Preservation,
Bruxelles.
Baldassarri, S. and Saiber, A. (edd.) 2000, Images of Quattrocento Florence, New Haven and London.
Bonfante, L., 1986, Etruscan Life and Afterlife: a Handbook of Etruscan Studies, Detroit.
Bruni, S. (ed.), 2000, The ancient ships of Pisa. After a year of work, Florence.
Greene, K, 1992, Roman Pottery, University of California Press/British Museum.
Greene, K., 2002, Archaeology: an Introduction (4th edition), London and
New York.
John W. Hayes, J.W., 2002, Handbook of Mediterranean Roman Pottery.
Haynes, S., 2000, Etruscan Civilization, London.
Harris, E., 1989, Principles of Archaeological Stratigraphy, London (Academic Press). Free download on
http://www.harrismatrix.com/book/Principles_of_Archaeological_Stratigraphy.pdf
Hopkins K., 1997, A world full of gods, Cambridge.
Horden, P. and Purcell, N., The Corrupting Sea, A study of Mediterranean History, U.K. (Blackwell
Publishing). Online on Google books.
84
Leighton, R., 2004, Tarquinia: an Etruscan city, London.
Megale, C., 2009, Fare l’archeologo per passione e per mestiere, Pontedera (Engl. translation).
Ranieri Panetta M., 2004, Pompeii: The History, Life and Art of the Buried City, White Star.
Renfrew, C. and Bahn, P., 1991, Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice, London.
Scullard, H.H., 1998, The Etruscan cities and Rome, New York.
Wallace-Hadrill, A., 1994, Houses and Society in Pompeii and Herculaneum, Princeton University Press.
WEEKLY SCHEDULE
DATE
TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION
Introduction to course and syllabus.
Week 1
(Jan 17 and
Archaeology: definition and kinds.
19)
(Bianchi - Megale)
READING ASSIGNMENTS
 MEGALE, Chap. 1, pp.
19-29 (Reader 1-8)

History of Archaeology: a survey (Bianchi)

Week 2
(Jan 24 and
26)
Week 3
(Jan 31st and
Feb 2nd)
Week 4
(Feb 7 and 9)
Week 5
(Feb 14 and
16)
Week 6
(Feb. 21 and
23)
Archaeology and methodology: the research
on the field (Megale)


Kinds of Archaeology (Bianchi)

The Etruscans. Art and Society (Bianchi).

Visit to the Archaeological National
Museum of Florence (Megale)
Archaeology of a city: the case of Populonia
(I) (Megale)
Archaeology of a city: the case of Populonia
(II) (Megale)

GREEN, Chap. 1, pp. 618 and 33-43 (Reader
92-104)
OPTIONAL:
RENFREW-BAHN, Chap.
1, pp. 21-52 (Reader 7591)
GREEN, Chap. 3, pp. 8799 (Reader 62-74)
OPTIONAL: HARRIS,
Chap. 1-6, pp. 1-53
(Reader 9-61)
GREEN, (Reader 105115)
BONFANTE, Chap. 2, pp.
47-65 (Reader 117-32)
Catalogo Museo Piomb
(Reader 140-165)
Material provided by
professor Megale
Etruria’s finest necropolis’: Tarquinia and
Cerveteri (Bianchi)

HAYNES, pp. 71-79
(Reader 133-39)
The Etruscans outside Etruria (Megale)

HAYNES pp. 221-33
(Reader 166-79)
Review session. (Bianchi-Megale)
Week 7
(Feb 27 –
March 1)
MID-TERM EXAM
March 2-11: Mid-term break
Week 8
(March 13 and
15)
The Roman superpower (Bianchi)
85

Class handout provided
by professor

BALDASSARRI-SAIBER,
pp. 10-20 (Reader 18082)
Archeology of Production: Etruscan and
Roman Pottery (Megale)

Class handout provided
by professor
(Under)water Archaeology: the ships of Pisa
(Megale)

Class handout provided
by professor
OPTIONAL: BRUNI,
pp. 21-79; AA.VV., pp.
11-15 (Reader 183-216)
Ancient Florentia (Bianchi)
FRIDAY,
March 17
Week 9
March 22
Week 10
(March 27 and
On-site visit to Fiesole Archaeological area
(Bianchi)
March 20th: class cancelled due to the Fiesole
trip

SATURDAY,
MARCH 31)
On-site visit to the Roman theatre of
Florentia Palazzo Vecchio (Bianchi)
Everyday life and luxury in ancient Pompeii
Week 11
(April 3 and 5) and Herculaneum (Bianchi)
Archaeology and Architecture: Pompeii
(Megale)
Documentary video: “Pompei. The last day”
Week 12
(April 10)
(Bianchi)
Friday, April
13 and
Saturday,
April 14
Week 13
(April 17 and
19)
Week 14
(April 24 and
26)
Week 15
(April 30 to
May 3)

HOPKINS, Chap. 1
(Reader 219-238)

CLARKE, pp. 1-29
(Reader 239- 253)
Overnight field trip to Pompeii and National Archaeological
Museum of Naples
Tuesday April 17, class cancelled due to the
field trip
Emperor Hadrian and Hadrian’s villa in
Tivoli (Bianchi)
Archaeology and Restoration (Megale)
REVIEW CLASS (Bianchi – Megale)
FINAL EXAM week
86
Class handout provided by
professor
Florence: The Story of the City
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Simon Young, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site visit fee: $ 55
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Remembering that ‘the history of Florence is the history of the West’, this course follows the
city from its Etruscan and Roman origins through three thousand years including the end of
antiquity, the glories of the Florentine Renaissance and the chaos of the Second World War.
Employing a series of innovative methods ranging from medieval map-making to detective
work in nineteenth-century digital archives students will come to know the forgotten or
hidden sides of the city as well as the better-known Florence of international tourism. Almost
half of the classes will take place out-of-doors. Marks will be given through a diary, exams,
quizzes and a final paper. Participation will be an important part of the course and class
discussion and written responses to lessons and visits are encouraged.
Objective: to understand how the city, in which the students will live and to whose life they
will, however briefly, contribute, has been shaped by the traumas and triumphs of three
thousand years of Italian history.
REQUIRED READINGS
The Florentine Reader* will be our text book: including, in chronological order, historical
sources and the reactions of modern and some not so modern scholars.
*The Florentine Reader includes extracts from the following authors – Anonymous secretary
of Metropolite Isidore, Barrett Browning, Boccaccio, Casanova, G.K. Chesterton, Dino
Compagni, George Eliot, Filicaja, Gherardi, Landucci on Savonarola, Lee-Hamilton,
Machiavelli, Procopius, Pulci, Rinnucini, Savonarola, Vasari and Villani.
REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING
VISITS. This course is based, in large part, on visits and walks in and around Florence.
Students will be expected to prepare for these trips through a series of readings and, in some
cases, ‘viewings’ (of photographs and pictures). Punctuality will be absolutely vital! Students
should also take care to dress in a way that shows respect toward any religious sites that they
visit.
APPOINTMENTS. Students are strongly encouraged to get in touch with their teacher over
any queries or problems or points of interest with the course. Appointments are best arranged
by email ([email protected]). Email is also a convenient way to stay in touch more
generally and will be used extensively.
GRADING. Marking for the course breaks down into five parts: (I) Participation (10%). All
students are given participation points for: their contribution to each class; their responses to
mandatory readings; and their responses to optional email assignments and extra-curricular
readings. (II) Quizzes (10%). 2 quizzes both with 5 multiple choice questions (A-D) and 5
short form questions. (III-IV) Midterm and Final Exam (25%). Part One – 10 multiple choice
questions (A-D) and 10 short form questions: 30% of the exam. Part Two ten essay questions
of which the student must answer two: each essay is worth 35% of the exam and the titles are
pre-released. (V) Final Paper (25%): a paper on a building, an episode, a period or an
individual from Florentine History. Previous titles have included ‘Machiavelli and Florence’,
‘The Creation of the Cathedral Complex’, ‘April Blood: a study in the Pazzi Conspiracy and
Lauro Martines’. (VI) Florentine Diary (5%): a weekly written piece reflecting on visits
around the city and lesson content.
87
ABSENCE. All students are allowed two unjustified absences. After this any absence will
count negatively against the student’s participation mark. It goes without saying that students
will be responsible for finding out what they have missed in terms of handouts, homework
and basic class material.
MAKE-UP POLICY. Quizzes or exams cannot be made up save in the most exceptional
circumstances: e.g. personal illness with a doctor’s note. When make-ups are given the
student will be directed to write a paper on a subject chosen by the teacher.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
RECOMMENDED READING
A very limited bibliography restricted to works in our library or works that are easily available might
include…
Brackett, John Criminal Justice and Crime in Late Renaissance Florence (Cambridge 1992)
Brucker, Gene Florence: The Golden Age, 1138-1737 (London 1998)
Brucker, Gene Renaissance Florence, (Berkeley, 1983).
Brucker, Gene Giovanni and Lusanna: Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence (London 1995)
Campbell, Katie A Paradise of Exiles: The Anglo-American Gardens of Florence (London 2009)
Cardini, Franco A Short History of Florence (Florence 1999)
Cochrane, Eric Florence in the Forgotten Centuries, 1527-1800: a History of Florence and the
Florentines in the Age of the Grand Dukes (Chicago 1973)
Garin, Eugenio (ed,), Renaissance Characters (Chicago 1997)
Hale, John Florence and the Medici (London 2001)
Hibbert, Christopher Florence: the Biography of a City (London 2004)
Hobday, Charles A Golden Ring: English Poets in Florence from 1373 to the Present Day (London
1997)
Kent, Dale Cosimo de Medici and the Florentine Renaissance (New Haven 2000)
Levey, Michael Florence: A Portrait (London 1996)
Martines, Lauro April Blood: Florence and the Plot Against the Medici (London 2004)
Martines, Lauro Fire in the City: Savonarola and the Struggle for the Soul of Renaissance Florence
(Oxford 2006)
McCarthy, Mary Stones of Florence (London 1998)
Parks, Tim Medici Money (London 2005)
Salvadori, Roberto G. The Jews of Florence: From the Origins of the Community up to the Present
(Florence 2001)
Schevill, Ferdinand History of Florence: From the Founding of the City through the Renaissance
(London 1936)
CLASSES
1) Wed AM, Jan 18:
Introduction to the course
Assessment: Introductory sheets.
2) Wed PM, Jan 18
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Situating Florence’. Fitting Florence into Western History.
3) Wed AM, Jan 25
External Lesson: ‘In Search of Etruria’. Bus ride to Fiesole including city walls and
heights and the Etruscan relics in the museum.
4) Wed PM, Jan 25:
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Etruscan Florence: 1000 B.C.-100 B.C.’: An introduction to
Etruscan Civilization and pre-Roman Tuscany.
Assessment: Class chooses the six dates that they will use in the course
Assigned Reading: 2.3 ‘Florentine Histories’
88
5) Wed AM, Feb 1
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Roman Florentia: 100 B.C.-400 A.D.’ A description of Roman
expansion in northern Italy and the paradoxes of Romanization there.
6) Wed PM, Feb 1
Assessment: Florentine Diary Workshop
External Lesson: ‘In Search of Roman Florence’ – a visit to seven Roman sites in
central Florence. Stress on continuity in the city and a challenge to the students to
find the hidden Roman presence.
7) Wed AM, Feb 8
Powerpoint Lecture: Florentine Locations
Assessment: Mock quiz for quiz 1 in the next class
8) Wed PM, Feb 8:
External Lesson: Santa Reparata and Campanile
9) Wed AM, Feb 15
Assessment: Quiz 1
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Early Medieval Florence: 400-900’. The collapse of the
Roman city and the Roman west and the rise of Christian Florence.
Assigned Reading: 2.10 ‘Procopius’
10) Wed PM, Feb 15
External Lesson: San Miniato and Piazzale Michelangelo, ‘Mapping Florence from
the Earliest Times to Today’. Mapping assignment based on modern street maps and
the earliest medieval and renaissance portraits of the city.
11) Wed AM, Feb 22
Assigned Reading: 2.11 ‘Factional Florence from Villani’
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Medieval Florence: 900-1200’. The northern Italian city-states
and ‘the take off’ of these centers in the eleventh and twelfth century.
12) Wed PM, Feb 22
Internal Lesson: Documentary on Early and Medieval Florence
Assessment: Discussion of Mid Term.
13) Wed AM, Feb 28
Review class
14) Wed PM, Feb 28
Mid Term
15) Wed AM, Mar 14
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘What was the Renaissance and why it matters today’.
Introduction to the Renaissance
Assigned Reading: 2.6 ‘George Eliot’s Proem’
16) Wed PM, Mar 14
External Lesson: Palazzo Vecchio, ‘Florentine Government’ and Orsanmichele.
17) Wed AM, Mar 21
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘The Medici: 1200-1500’. The Rise of the Medici and
Florentine cultural and economic pre-eminence.
Assigned Reading: 2.13 ‘Describing Renaissance Florence’
18) Wed PM, Mar 21
Assessment: Final Paper Workshop
19) Fri AM, Mar 23
Trip to Santa Brigida
20) Wed AM, Mar 28
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘The Economy of Renaissance Florence’.
Assessment: Final paper outline to be given in
Assigned Reading: 2.15 ‘Views on Lorenzo the Magnificent’s Regime’
21) Wed PM, Mar 28: No class for field trip on Mar 23
22) Wed AM, Apr 4:
External Lesson: San Marco, ‘Two Different Worlds’.
89
23) Wed PM, Apr 4:
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Savonarola’. Tensions inherent in late Renaissance Florence
and Christendom generally.
Assigned Reading: 2.19 ‘Landucci on Savonarola’
24) Wed AM, Apr 11:
External Lesson: The Synagogue, guided tour as an introduction to the next lesson.
25) Wed PM, April 11:
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Early Modern Florence – the Forgotten City: 1500-1900’, Did
Florence become a backwater?
Assigned Reading: 2.20 ‘Casanova’
Assessment: Quiz 2
26) Wed AM, April 18:
Powerpoint Lecture: ‘Florence and Tourism: 1600-2000’ Florence through foreign
eyes.
Assessment: Final paper check up – each student gives a brief summary of ‘where
they are at’ to the class.
Assigned Reading: 2.24 ‘Baedeker’
27) Wed PM, April 18:
External Lesson: The English Cemetery
28) Wed, April 25:
Powerpoint: ‘Twentieth Century Florence’. The city under Fascism, its rape in the
war and the post-war settlement
Assessment: Final Paper to be handed in
29) Wed, April 25:
Viewing: Fifth part of Paisà
Assigned Reading: 2.25 ‘Florence in Black and White’
Assessment: Final Exam discussion
30) Wed, May 2 [to be confirmed]:
Assessment: Final Exam
90
The History and Culture of Food:
A Comparative Analysis
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Peter Fischer, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site visit fee: $ 100
COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this course we will examine the relationship between food and culture in Italy through a
variety of readings, discussions, out-door activities and tasting experiences. We will look at
food in its social and cultural context from a multi-disciplinary perspective — history,
anthropology, sociology, and geography. The course will trace the historical evolution of
Italian cuisine in time and space focusing on the many global influences which over the
centuries have shaped the use of different food products, preparation methods, consumption
patterns, i.e. the Italian approach towards food. Food practices will be used as a window for
viewing culture as a whole, much as one might study painting or literature.
COURSE METHOD
The course will be taught through a combination of formal lectures (incl. power point
presentations) class discussions, student presentations, tastings and out-door activities
designed to engage students with the local community such as a culinary walking tour in
Florence and a field trip to the Tuscan countryside.
OBJECTIVES OF COURSE
By the end of this course you should be able to:
 understand the relevance of an interdisciplinary approach studying food;
 be familiar with the historical and social construction of taste;
 develop an understanding of food as a most fundamental cultural aspect of Italian
society and
 have enhanced your academic skills of critical analysis, literature reviews and oral
presentation.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Course requirements include regular class attendance, class participation, required readings
and pop quizzes, paper project, a mid-term exam and a final exam.
Class Attendance, Class Participation, Required Readings and Pop Quizzes (10%)
Attendance is mandatory and (together with class participation) will count 10% in the final
grade. Absences will automatically lower your final grade and more than three absences will
have a substantial impact on it. If you miss class, you are responsible for obtaining the class
notes. Absence is not an excuse for not knowing about an assignment or a topic.
Class Participation: I expect that you will be committed to giving a professional effort in this
class. Participation means active engagement in the course: being consistently prepared for
class (having really read that day’s assignments), asking questions, responding to questions,
offering your own insights and opinions, attentive listening to others. Class participation
grades are not automatic. I begin by assuming a C for each student’s class participation grade
and move from there.
The Required Readings are an integral part of this course and should not be considered
supplemental. Reading assignments should be done for the class day they are assigned.
Unannounced Pop-Quizzes covering reading assignments may be given periodically
91
throughout the semester; these quizzes cannot be made up unless the instructor was notified in
advance of the absence.
Paper Project (30%)
Each student is expected to write a paper of about 8 pages. Topics must be selected in
agreement with me. The topics are determined by the available reading, and guidance will be
given throughout.
You may choose to pursue further a topic that we are exploring in class, or examine another
area of academic interest which is related to the subject of this course. I urge to discuss
project ideas with me early on. This is to help you get thinking about your project early
enough to do a good job. Time passes by quickly (particularly in Florence!). I will not accept
any paper without the approved paper outline (see below) attached! Late papers will receive a
drop in grade.
Basic resources and Bibliography. Conduct a thorough search. Basic resources are available
at the Institute’s library. You may also explore the Internet and look through magazines,
newspapers, and archives. Journal articles are one of the primary sources of new theories and
research findings. As an abroad student you should also use the on-line library facilities of
your home university to get access to important databases such as JSTOR.
I will expect at least 4 scholarly references (books, scholarly articles). All information is
helpful. See me for ideas and talk to anyone who might be of help. I will not accept a topic
that you have used/are using for another class.
Paper Outline. The outline of your paper project should contain:
 the title of your paper;
 the bibliographic references, and
 a short abstract.
The paper outline should be a short, single-spaced, 1-2 paragraph statement of the goals and
conclusions of your paper. It should allow the reader to grasp immediately what the paper
seeks to communicate in terms of questions, evidence, methods, or interpretations. The more
detailed and specific your outline, the easier writing your paper will be. The approved outline
must be attached to the proper paper.
Mid-Term Exam (25%)
An exam covering all topics presented until the mid-term exam. It will consist of a series of
multiple choice and short answer questions. The exam will take approximately 90 minutes to
complete. It will constitute 25% of the final grade.
Final Exam (35%)
The final exam is the final step in the sequential learning process the course involves. In this
exam you bring together the various concepts/topics we have studied. The exam will take
approximately 120 minutes to complete. It will constitute 35% of the final grade. This is the
only time the exam will be given. Students who plan to depart prior to the exam should not
take this course. You must pass the final exam to pass the course.
Review Sessions
Thorough review sessions are held in indicated sessions prior to both the midterm and final
exams. A written study guide will be made available for students.
GRADING
Course grades are based on midterm and final exams, and the paper project; attendance and
class participation as well as pop-quizzes are also considered.
92
Grading will be done on a percentage basis:
Letter Grade
Numerical Score
Range
Equivalent
93%
- 100%
A
90% - 92%
A87% -89%
B+
83% - 86%
B
80% - 82%
B77% - 79%
C+
73% - 76%
C
70% - 72%
C67% - 69%
D+
63% - 66%
D
60% - 62%
D59% or less
F
Student
Performance
Exceptional
Excellent
Superior
Satisfactory
Low Pass
Fail (no credit)
ASSESSMENT
10% Class Attendance and Participation
30% Paper Project and Presentation
25% Mid-Term Exam
35% Final Exam
ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
This includes all forms of cheating i.e. copying during exam either from a fellow student or
making unauthorized use of notes and plagiarism, i.e. presenting, as one's own, the ideas or
words of another person for academic evaluation (paper, written tests, etc.) without proper
acknowledgment. This includes also insufficient or incomplete acknowledgement, or failure
to acknowledge a source that has been paraphrased. The Institute believes strongly in
academic honesty and integrity. Essential to intellectual growth is the development of
independent thought and a respect for the thoughts of others. I have and I will fail students for
plagiarism. I also report them to the Director for appropriate action. If you have concerns with
any aspect of the course, please feel free to discuss them with me. If you ever feel that I have
treated you in less than a respectful manner, please raise the issue with me.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class. There will be no breaks during class.
You should not leave the classroom except in order to use the restroom. Extended departures
are unacceptable and will negatively affect your attendance and participation grade.
Use of technology in the classroom. Please note that mobile phones must be turned off before
the beginning of each class. Use of a mobile phone during class (such as texting) may be
grounds for considering you absent from class that day. Similarly, computers may be used for
taking notes during class lectures and discussions; however, surfing the net, browsing
facebook, etc. may lead to your being counted as absent from class that day.
TEXTBOOK
A Course Pack (CP) covering the Required Readings will be made available. Additional
reading assignments will be made available by the instructor.
Suggested readings: Capatti, A., and M. Montanari, Italian Cuisine. A Cultural History. New
York: Columbia University Press, 2003; Flandrin, J.L. and Montanari M. (eds), Food - A
Culinary History, New York: Columbia University Press, 1999
93
OFFICE HOURS
My office hours are on Mondays and Wednesdays from 12.30 am to 1.15 pm. If you cannot
make it to these office hours, special appointments may be scheduled directly with me. You
can also address me via email ([email protected]).
SCHEDULE OF TOPICS AND READINGS*
Week 1
Jan 16 (Mon): What will this course be about? Introduction to course material.
Suggested readings:
Belasco, 2-23
Jan 18 (Wed): Why Food is Fundamental, Fun, Frightening, and Far-Reaching
Required readings:
Paul Rozin (1999) in: http://www.ksla.se/sv/retrieve_file.asp?n=325
Week 2
Jan 23 (Mon): Excursion: Exploration of the Florentine Food System (visit to the
Central Market and tasting of typical Florentine street food)
Jan 25 (Wed): Workshop (Discussion of Student Paper Projects)
Week 3
Jan 30 (Mon): ): Prehistoric Societies and Food – The ‘Invention’ of Agriculture and the
Benefits of a Paleolithic Diet
Required readings:
Boyd Eaton, 130-137; Stahl, 137-141
Feb 1 (Wed): Food Systems and Models of Civilization in the Classical World – The
Definition of Cultural Identity through Food and the Ideal of Moderation
Required Readings:
Montanari (1999) 69-78; Dalby, 209-214
NOTE: PAPER OUTLINES MUST BE GIVEN IN BY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Feb 3 (Fri): ): Field Trip (Group 1): TBA
This field day-trip is of fundamental importance (mandatory!) for our class. Please
schedule your obligations in time so you can participate. Program and details to be
announced.
Week 4
Feb 6 (Mon): Food as a Source of Sin and of Salvation: The Christian Food Model and
Early Medieval Food Culture: You Eat What You Are
Required Readings:
Montanari (1999), 165-167; Montanari (1996), 15-26; Capatti/Montanari, 69-74
Feb 8 (Wed): The Arabs and Their Influence on European Food Culture - The Triumph
of Spices
Required Readings:
Rosenberger, 207-223; Schivelbusch, pp. 3-14; Davidson, 744-746
Feb 10 (Fri): Field Trip (Group 2): TBA
94
This field day-trip is of fundamental importance (mandatory!) for our class. Please
schedule your obligations in time so you can participate. Program and details to be
announced.
Week 5
Feb 13 (Mon): The Renaissance Banquet and the Introduction of Modern Table
Manners
Required Readings:
Grieco, 302-313; Santich, 176-179; Visser, 586-592
Feb 15 (Wed): The Age of European Colonialism and the Columbian Exchange
Required Readings:
Long-Solis, 436-439; Flandrin (1999), 349-359
Week 6
Feb 20 (Mon): no class (because of Friday activities)
Feb 22 (Wed): REVIEW
Feb 24 (Fri): Field Trip (Group 3): TBA
This field day-trip is of fundamental importance (mandatory!) for our class. Please
schedule your obligations in time so you can participate. Program and details to be
announced.
Week 7
Feb 27 (Mon): MID-TERM EXAM
Feb 29 (Wed): no class
Week 8
MID-TERM BREAK (March 2-11)
Week 9
March 12 (Mon): The Hot Beverage Revolution - The Internet in a Cup of Coffee
Required Readings:
Huetz de Lemps, 383-393; The Economist, 46-48
March 14 (Wed): The French “Taste” Revolution in the 17th Century: The Rejection of
Artificial Cuisine
Required Readings:
Flandrin (1999), 362-373; Flandrin (1999), 418-432
NOTE: PAPERS MUST BE HANDED IN BY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 LATEST!
Week 10
March 19 (Mon): Wine as a Marker of Civilization
Required Readings:
Phillips, 551-557; Charters, 557-561
March 21 (Wed): Workshop: The Art of Wine Appreciation
Required Readings:
Davidson, 551-553
95
Week 11
March 26 (Mon): Food and Industrialization – The Return of the Omnivore’s Dilemma
Required Readings:
Flandrin (1999), 435-441; Montanari (1996), 152-171; Pollan, 1-11 (note: not in the
reader: to be distributed by the instructor)
March 28 (Wed): The Critique of Industrial Agriculture and the Development of
Alternatives (clips of ‘Food Inc’ and class discussion)
Required Readings:
TBA
Week 12
April 2 (Mon): Italian Mass Immigration to the United States and the Creation of an
“Italian-American” Cuisine
Required Readings:
Diner, 48-83; Del Giudice (2000), 245-248
April 4 (Wed): Big Night (movie) and Class Discussion
Week 13
April 9 (Mon): no class (national holiday)
April 11 (Wed): Italian Food Culture – A Universal Model? The Return of the
Omnivore’s Dilemma and the American ‘Discovery’ of the ‘Mediterranean Diet’
Required Readings:
Nestle, 1193-1203; The Mediterranean Diet Pyramid
Week 14
April 16 (Mon): Slow Food vs. Fast Food - The Italian Revolt Against Culinary
Americanization and the Globalization of Food Systems
Required Readings:
Counihan (2004), 35-56; Del Giudice (2003), 289-290
April 18 (Wed): Food and Cinema: The Representation of Italian Food Culture in
Italian and in American Movies (illustrated with selected film clips)
Week 15
April 23 (Mon): Class Discussion
April 25 (Wed): REVIEW
Week 15
April 30 – May 3: FINAL EXAM WEEK
*Note: We will stick to this schedule as closely as possible, but please be advised that this calendar is
subject to some minor modification. If you miss a class it is your responsibility to get in touch with a
class member or me to find out the following week’s material and activities.
96
History and Politics of Modern Italy:
From The Risorgimento to Fascism and WWII
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Peter Fischer, PhD
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course has been designed to review and examine the modern political history of Italy
from the end of the first World War to the present time. After a short overview over Italian
History before the 20th century the main areas of focus will be: the rise and the fall of Italian
fascism, the Second World War and the Cold War, the workings of governing institutions in
the post-war period (there will be detailed discussion of the postwar constitution and the new
political system), the role of the Church, political parties and movements, the European
unification process, black and red terrorism, as well as political corruption and political
conspiracy. There will also be detailed discussion of the crises and transformation of the postwar Italian political system in the early 1990s. This course will be followed in fall term by
“From Napoleon to World War I”.
COURSE METHOD
The course will be taught through a combination of formal lectures (incl. power point
presentations), document discussion workshops, film presentations and outdoor activities. The
lectures will provide a broad outline of the respective period while the workshops will enable
students to focus on key topics or themes. Students will engage in full class discussion and
small group work. There will be also several outdoor activities in Florence.
OBJECTIVES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES
The course seeks to provide students with basic knowledge about Italy’s modern political
history, so that they may evaluate the complexity of Italian politics with some degree of
sophistication. On successful completion of this course students will be able to gain a
command not only of the "facts" of modern Italian political history--the dates of key events,
the importance of major personalities, and such--but also come to understand the dynamics
involved: the basic trends of continuity and change, cause and effect, the interplay of regional,
national and international influences, and the significance of global events within Italy. The
two scheduled out-door activities should allow students to get some first-hand experiences of
the place where they study.
ASSESSMENT
10% Class Attendance, Class Participation and Pop-Quizzes
10% Class Presentation
30% Paper Project
20% Mid-Term Exam
30% Final Exam
GRADING
Grading will be done on a percentage basis:
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Letter Grade
Range
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
Numerical Score
Equivalent
93% - 100%
90% - 92%
87% -89%
83% - 86%
80% - 82%
77% - 79%
73% - 76%
70% - 72%
67% - 69%
63% - 66%
60% - 62%
59% or less
Student Performance
Exceptional
Excellent
Superior
Satisfactory
Low Pass
Fail (no credit)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Course requirements include regular class attendance, class participation, required readings
and pop quizzes, student presentations, a paper project, a mid-term exam and a final exam.
Class Attendance and Class Participation and Pop Quizzes (10%)
Attendance is mandatory. For spirited discussion we will need your active attention and
participation. Absences will have an effect on your final grade. Attendance (together with
class participation and pop-quizzes) will count 10% in the final grade, therefore absences will
automatically lower your final grade and more than three absences will have a substantial
impact on it. If you miss class, you are responsible for obtaining the class notes. Absence is
not an excuse for not knowing about an assignment or a topic
Class Participation: I expect that you will be committed to giving a professional effort in this
class. Participation means active engagement in the course: being consistently prepared for
class (having really read that day’s assignments); asking questions, responding to questions;
offering your own insights and opinions; attentive listening to others. Class participation
grades are not automatic. They are based on oral contributions to the collective learning
experience of the class as a whole in terms of asking pertinent questions, answering questions
correctly or, at least, provocatively, making insightful observations, and offering other
meaningful expressions of interest in the material that help encourage learning. I begin by
assuming a C for each student’s class participation grade and move from there.
The Required Readings are an integral part of this course and should not be considered
supplemental. Readings should be done for the class day they are assigned. Unannounced
Pop-Quizzes covering reading assignments (lectures) and documents (workshops) may be
given periodically throughout the semester; these quizzes cannot be made up unless the
instructor was notified in advance of the absence.
Paper Project (30%)
Each student is expected to write a paper of about 8-10 pages on one of the topics relating to
modern Italian political history. I will not accept any paper without the approved paper
outline (see below) attached! Late papers will receive a drop in grade.
Topics
The topics are determined by the available reading, and guidance will be given throughout.
You may choose to pursue further a topic that we are exploring in class, or examine another
area of academic interest which is related to the subject of this course. Topics must be
selected in agreement with me. I urge to discuss project ideas with me early on. This is to help
you get thinking about your project early enough to do a good job. Time passes by quickly
(particularly in Florence!).
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Basic resources and Bibliography
Conduct a thorough search. Basic resources are available at the Institute’s library. Do not be
afraid to use other libraries as well. You may also explore the Internet and look through
magazines, newspapers, and archives. Journal articles are one of the primary sources of new
theories and research findings. As an abroad student you should also use the on-line library
facilities of your home university to get access to important databases such as JSTOR. I will
expect at least 4 scholarly references (books, scholarly articles). All information is helpful.
See me for ideas and talk to anyone who might be of help. I will not accept a topic that you
have used/are using for another class.
Project Outline
The research outline of your research project should contain: 1) the title of your paper; 2) the
bibliographic references, and 3) a short abstract. The research outline should be a short,
single-spaced, 1-2 paragraph statement of the goals and conclusions of you paper. It should
allow the reader to grasp immediately what the paper seeks to communicate in terms of
questions, evidence, methods, or interpretations. After its return the approved outline must be
attached to the proper paper.
Student Presentations (10%)
This class is designed so that participation plays an integral role in the learning process. The
basic format for the course will consist of an introduction to the narrative and to key issues of
a specific chapter of modern political history in Italy followed by a “workshop session” the
same week. The introductory session will mainly consist of lectures. The workshop sessions
will consist of the presentation of source material (primary and secondary text sources,
documentary film material) for which selected student groups will take over responsibility,
followed by a class discussion on central themes raised in those documents. There will also be
discussion on key topics or themes introduced in the lecture of the same week. The student
groups are responsible for preparing questions and topics in order to stimulate lively class
discussions.
Mid-Term Exam (20%)
An exam covering all topics presented until the mid-term exam. It will consist of a series of
multiple choice and short answer questions and one short essay (about one page) chosen
among two questions. The exam will take approximately 90 minutes to complete and is closed
book/closed note and it will constitute 20% of the final grade.
Final Exam (30%)
The final exam is the final step in the sequential learning process the course involves. In this
exam you will bring together the various concepts/topics we have studied. The exam will take
approximately 120 minutes to complete. It will constitute 30% of the final grade. This is the
only time the exam will be given. Students who plan to depart prior to the exam should not
take this course.
REVIEW SESSIONS
Thorough review sessions are held in indicated sessions prior to both the mid-term and final
exams. A written study guide will be made available for students.
ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
This includes all forms of cheating i.e. copying during exam either from a fellow student or
making unauthorized use of notes and plagiarism, i.e. presenting, as one's own, the ideas or
words of another person for academic evaluation (research paper, written tests, etc.) without
proper acknowledgment. This includes also insufficient or incomplete acknowledgement, or
failure to acknowledge a source that has been paraphrased. The Institute believes strongly in
academic honesty and integrity. Essential to intellectual growth is the development of
independent thought and a respect for the thoughts of others. I have and I will fail students for
99
plagiarism. I also report them to the Director for appropriate action. If you have concerns with
any aspect of the course, please feel free to discuss them with me. If you ever feel that I have
treated you in less than a respectful manner, please raise the issue with me.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which
the school occupies and they are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum during class. There
will be no breaks during class. However, you should not leave the classroom except in order
to use the restroom. Extended departures are unacceptable and will negatively affect your
Attendance and Participation grade.
REQUIRED READINGS
Material contained in course readers. Bound copies covering the Required Readings and the
Documentary Material will be made available. Additional material will be made available by
the instructor.
Suggested readings: P. Ginsborg, A History of Contemporary Italy – Society and Politics
1943-1988, London: Penguin, 1990; P. McCarthy (ed), Italy since 1945, Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2000;
OFFICE HOURS
My office hours are on Mondays and on Wednesdays from 12.15 to 13.00 a.m.. If you cannot
make it to these office hours, special appointments may be scheduled directly with me. You
can also contact me via email ([email protected]).
SCHEDULE OF TOPICS AND READINGS*
WEEK 1
Jan 17 (Tue): What will this course be about? Introduction to course material.
Jan 19 (Thu): LECTURE 1 - Italian Political History before the Twentieth Century.
A short overview
Required Readings:
Ch. Duggan (2000), 129-146
WEEK 2
Jan 24 (Tue): LECTURE 2 – Italy and the ‘Great War’ (1914 - 1918)
Required Readings:
Blinkhorn, 11-25; P. Corner (2001), 264-285
Jan 26 (Thu): Workshop - Assignment and Discussion of Student Paper Projects
WEEK 3
Jan 31 (Tue): LECTURE 3 - The Fascist Revolution after WWI
Required Readings:
Blinkhorn, 11-25
Feb 2 (Thu): Presentation and Discussion of Documentary Film Material
WEEK 4
Feb 7 (Tue): WORKSHOP – Introduction to Major European Political Ideologies
Required Readings:
TBA
NOTE: PAPER OUTLINES MUST BE GIVEN IN BY FEBRUARY 7 (TUE)
Feb 9 (Thu): LECTURE 4 – Fascist State and Society
Required Readings:
P. Corner (2001), 264-285
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WEEK 5
Feb 14 (Tue): LECTURE 5 - World War II, Resistance Movement and Liberation
Required Readings:
P. Ginsborg (1990), 39-71
Feb 16 (Thu): WORKSHOP: The Italian Resistance Movement – Encounter and
Discussion at the ‘Istituto Storico della Resistenza’ in Florence
WEEK 6
Feb 21 (Tue): DOCUMENT WORKSHOP 1 - Student Presentations and Class
Discussion
Primary Sources:
DOC 1/1: B. Mussolini and G. Gentile: Foundations and Doctrine of Fascism (1932)
DOC 1/2: The Manifesto of Race (1938)
DOC 1/3: Mussolini Speech, 1940
DOC 1/4: Speech delivered by Premier Benito Mussolini, Feb 23, 1941
DOC 1/5: Radio Address Roosevelt Dec 9, 1941
Feb 23 (Thu): Post-War Settlement: The Peace Treaty and the New Constitution +
REVIEW
Required Readings:
P. Ginsborg (1990), 98-112; Ch. Duggan (2000), 244-255
WEEK 7
Feb 28 (Tue): MID-TERM EXAMS
March 1 (Thu): no class
WEEK 8
MID-TERM BREAK (March 4-13)
WEEK 9
March 13 (Tue): LECTURE 6 - Parties and Politics: The 1948 Elections and
International Relations
Required Readings:
P. Ginsborg (1990), 110-120; J.L. Harper (2000), 95-117
March 15 (Thu): DOCUMENT WORKSHOP 2 - Student Presentations and Class
Discussion
Primary Sources:
DOC 2/1: The New Constitution, 1948 (selection)
DOC 2/2: The Truman Doctrine
DOC 2/3: The Marshall Plan
DOC 2/4: Interviews with Mark Wyatt (CIA) and Gianni Agnelli (FIAT) on the 1948
elections.
DOC 2/5: North Atlantic Treaty, 1949
NOTE: PAPERS MUST BE HANDED IN BY THURSDAY, MARCH 15 LATEST!
WEEK 10
March 20 (Tue): LECTURE 7 - The Economic Miracle and Social Modernization
Required Readings:
V. Zamagni (2000) 42-50; P. Allum (2000), 10-41
March 22 (Thu): Political Walking Tour Through Florence
WEEK 11
March 27 (Tue): LECTURE 8 - The Opening to the Left
Required Readings:
D. Hine (2001) 320-347; P. Ginsborg (1990), 333-337 and 361-363
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March 29 (Thu): DOCUMENT WORKSHOP 3 - Student Presentations and Class
Discussion
Primary Sources:
DOC 3/1: Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy, 1961
DOC 3/2: The Italian Political Crisis, CIA Memo, May 17, 1960
DOC 3/3: National Elections in Italy, CIA Doc, April 19, 1963
DOC 3/4: The Current Situation in Italy, Special Report CIA, July 26
WEEK 12
April 3 (Tue): LECTURE 9 - The Historic Compromise and the “Anni di Piombo”
Required Readings:
P. Ginsborg (1990), 354-358; Ch. Duggan (2000), 269-286
►April 5 (Thu): OUT DOOR ACTIVITY 2: The Italian Student Revolt. Guest Lecture
and Discussion at the ARCI headquarter in Florence
WEEK 13
April 10 (Tue): LECTURE 10 - Tangentopoli and the Show Down of the Post-War Party
System
Required Readings:
M.J. Bull and M. Rhodes (1997), 1-13; G. Pasquino (2000), 69-86
April 12 (Thu): DOCUMENT WORKSHOP 4 - Student Presentations and Class
Discussion
Primary Sources:
DOC 4/1: The Moro Kidnapping and Italian Politics, CIA Memo, April 27, 1978
DOC 4/2: Danger “Eurocommunism”, TIME-Magazine, June 20, 1977
DOC 4/3: Italian Communist Political Strategy, CIA Memo, July 15, 1980
DOC 4/4: Italy: Prospects for Bettino Craxi’s Socialists, CIA Memo, 1981
DOC 4/5: The Italian Communist Party, CIA Memo, March 30, 1984
DOC 4/6: George Kennan Interview on End of Cold War, 1996
WEEK 14
April 17 (Tue): LECTURE 11 – The Rise of Berlusconi and the Emergence of a New
Party System
Required Readings:
M.J. Bull and J.L. Newell (2005), 39-60, and 61-62; P. Ginsborg (2004), 32-40 and 57-72
April 19 (Thu): OUT DOOR ACTIVITY 3: Encounter With Local Government
Required Readings:
TBA
WEEK 15
April 24 (Tue): Class Discussion
April 26 (Thu): REVIEW
Week 16
April 30 - May 3: FINAL EXAM WEEK
*Note: We will stick to this schedule as closely as possible, but please be advised that
this calendar is subject to some minor modification. If you miss a class it is your
responsibility to get in touch with a class member or me to find out the following
week’s material and activities.
102
The European Union
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Simone Paoli, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: none
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The European Union is still the biggest capitalist marketplace, the biggest trading power and
one of the most influential political players in the world, though it is facing one of the worst
political and economic crises in its history. The course is divided into two parts. The first one
focuses on the main policies of the European Union, taking into account historical evolution,
institutional structure, political objectives and major achievements of each area of activity.
The second one concentrates on the relations between the European Union and the United
States, analysing separately the most important dimensions of the Transatlantic relationship.
OBJECTIVE
The aim of the course is to give the students explanations for the current trends of the
European Union. The focus is on present, the study of the past being a way to better
understand the European Union as it is nowadays. On completion of the course, the students
will have acquired the instruments for grasping, interpreting and discussing critically the
topical issues of the European Union and its relations with the United States.
PREREQUISITES
There are no specific prerequisites for this course. However, a basic background in history
and international affairs is recommended.
METHODOLOGY
Classes are structured as lectures, student presentations and group discussions. Lectures do
not simply explain the readings, but also complement them by providing further figures,
information and anecdotes. In doing so, the instructor makes extensive use of multimedia
presentation formats such as power points, movies and documentaries.
Short field trips will provide students with a better understanding of what the European Union
represents for European citizens and opportunities to meet with experts will offer them a
wider range of points of view on the present and future of the European Union.
ATTENDANCE
Attendance is mandatory. If a student misses a class it will be his/her care to catch up with
what he/she missed. Every absence will lower the attendance grade.
PARTICIPATION
Students are expected to behave properly in class. Eating and drinking are not allowed. Cell
phones are not allowed. Taking notes during classes is recommended. Active participation is
highly recommended.
ASSIGNMENTS
- Readings: every week students will be assigned something to read at home from
textbooks, from scholarly articles or from daily and weekly press, and they are
expected to be able to discuss the content in class; readings must be done in advance
so as to stimulate lively debates in class;
- Research papers: each student is expected to present a research paper on a topic
agreed upon with the instructor concerning the European Union; not doing so and
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displaying unpreparedness in
participation/assignment grades.
the
class
discussion
negatively
affect
the
EXAMS
Students will have a mandatory Mid-Term Exam and a mandatory Final Exam. Both exams
will consist of essay questions or short answer questions. A short multiple-choice
questionnaire might complement the essay questions and the short answer questions at the
instructor's discretion. Exams will relate to both the readings and the class lectures.
EVALUATION AND GRADING SYSTEM
20% Class attendance
10% Class participation
10% Research paper
30% Mid-Term Exam
30% Final Exam
GRADING SCALE
A Excellent 93-100
A- 90-92
B+ Good 87-89
B 83-86
B- 80-82
C+ Average 77-79
C 73-76
C- 70-72
D+ Passing 67-69
D 63-66
D- 60-62
F Failure 0-59
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
TEXTBOOKS AND READINGS
- Textbooks:
Michelle Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, European Union Politics, Oxford,
Oxford University Press, 2010;
Steven McGuire, Michael Smith, The European Union and the United States.
Competition and Convergence in the Global Arena, New York, Palgrave Macmillan,
2008.
- Articles from collective volumes and from daily newspapers or periodical will be
provided directly by the instructor in class.
SOURCES
- Useful books on the European Union available in the Rucellai Library
John McCormick, Understanding the European Union: a concise introduction, New York, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2008
Elizabeth Bomberg, John Peterson, Alexander Stubb (eds.), The European Union, Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2008
Neil Fligstein, Euroclash: the European Union, European identity, and the future of Europe, Oxford,
Oxford University Press, 2008
104
Andreas Staab, The European Union explained: institutions, actors, global impact, Bloomington,
Indiana University Press, 2008
Fraser Cameron, An introduction to European foreign policy, London – New York, Routledge, 2007
Alberto Martinelli, Transatlantic divide: comparing American and European society, Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2007
Stefano Bartolini, Restructuring Europe: centre formation, system building and political structuring
between the nation-state and the European Union, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2005
-
Useful Weblinks
http://europa.eu/: official gateway to the European Union
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/en/index.htm: access to European Union law
http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/index_en.htm: website for the Public Opinion Analysis sector of the
European Commission
http://www.ena.lu/: multimedia reference on the history of Europe
http://www.euractiv.com/: up to date news within the European Union
http://euobserver.com/: up to date news within the European Union.
http://www.eurunion.org/eu/: official website of the European Union delegation to the United States
LESSONS
Please note. Students are required to purchase the textbooks and be prepared to discuss
assigned materials in class; further readings may be assigned by the teacher directly in class.
Please consider that the contents of individual classes may be changed throughout the course
according to the class's progress.
16 January
Introduction to the Course
18 January
Reading:
The European Union: a Historical Overview (I)
Derek W. Urwin, The European Community: from 1945 to 1985, in Michelle
Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics,
Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 15-30
23 January
Reading:
The European Union: a Historical Overview (II)
David Phinnemore, The European Union: Establishment and Development, in
Michelle Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union
politics, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 32-46
25 January
Reading:
The European Union: What it is, How it Works, What it Does
Michelle Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, Introduction, in Michelle
Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics,
Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 3-5
30 January
Field Trip
The Symbols of the European Union
1 February
Reading:
Borders of Europe
Ian Barnes, Pamela Barnes, Enlargement, in Michelle Cini, Nieves PérezSolórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2010, pp. 418-430
6 February
Reading:
Towards Further Enlargement?
Ian Barnes, Pamela Barnes, Enlargement, in Michelle Cini, Nieves PérezSolórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2010, pp. 430-434
8 February
The Common Market: the Miracle of Growth, the Crisis of
Welfare State
105
Reading:
Michelle Egan, The Single Market, in Michelle Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano
Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford University
Press, 2010, pp. 258-274
13 February
The European Social Model: What It Was, What It is, What It
Will Be
Gerda Falkner, The EU’s Social Policy, in Michelle Cini, Nieves PérezSolórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2010, pp. 275-290
Reading:
15 February
Reading:
20 February
Reading:
The Economic and Monetary Union: Will the Euro Survive the
Crisis?
Amy Verdun, Economic and Monetary Union, in Michelle Cini, Nieves
Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford,
Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 324-339
The Foreign, Security and Defence Policy: between Internal
Rivalries and American Hegemony
Robert Dover, From CFSP to ESDP: the EU’s Foreign, Security and Defence
Policies, in Michelle Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, edited by,
European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 239-257
22 February
Review Session
27 February
MID-TERM EXAM
2-11 March
MID-TERM BREAK
12 March
Reading:
Emigration and Immigration: towards a European Fortress?
Emek M. Uçarer, Justice and Home Affairs, in Michelle Cini, Nieves PérezSolórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2010, pp. 306-323
14 March
Reading:
Regional Policy: the Fragmented Continent
Marco Brunazzo, Regional Policy, in Michelle Cini, Nieves Pérez-Solórzano
Borragán, edited by, European Union politics, Oxford, Oxford University
Press, 2010, pp. 291-305
19 March
Reading:
Environmental Policy: towards a New Model of Development
David Benson, Andrew Jordan, Environmental Policy, in Michelle Cini,
Nieves Pérez-Solórzano Borragán, edited by, European Union politics,
Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 358-372
21 March
What Holds Europe Together?
26 March
Field Trip
European Public Opinion and European Integration Process
28 March
Reading:
The Relations between the European Union and the United
States: a Historical Overview (I)
Steven McGuire, Michael Smith, The European Union and the United States.
Competition and Convergence in the Global Arena, New York, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2008, pp. 6-26
106
2 April
Reading:
4 April
Reading:
11 April
Reading:
16 April
Reading:
The Relations between the European Union and the United
States: a Historical Overview (II)
Steven McGuire, Michael Smith, The European Union and the United States.
Competition and Convergence in the Global Arena, New York, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2008, pp. 26-35
The Trade Dimension of the Transatlantic Relations:
Agreements and Disputes
Steven McGuire, Michael Smith, The European Union and the United States.
Competition and Convergence in the Global Arena, New York, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2008, pp. 82-95
The Security Dimension of the Transatlantic Relations: a New
Agenda
Steven McGuire, Michael Smith, The European Union and the United States.
Competition and Convergence in the Global Arena, New York, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2008, pp. 243-260
The Monetary Dimension of the Transatlantic Relations: a EuroDollar Struggle?
Steven McGuire, Michael Smith, The European Union and the United States.
Competition and Convergence in the Global Arena, Basingstoke, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2008, pp. 96-118
18 April
The Cultural Dimension of the Transatlantic Relations:
Differences between American Values and European Values
23 April
Field Trip
Europeans’ Perceptions of the United States
25 April
Review Session
1 May
FINAL EXAM
107
The Business of Art: the Economics and Management of Culture
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Francesca Marini, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Site Visit fee: $ 65.00
E-mail: [email protected]
Office hours: after class
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Markets for visual arts provide a particularly fertile ground for those concerned with the
economics of culture. The study of the past and current structure of the market for visual art,
the mechanisms that fuel this flourishing market and the involvement of public and private
institutions in the context of the current globalization of the arts, provides significant
instruments for the business and marketing studies. While analyzing the economic impact of
past and current art law students will evaluate the organization of visual arts and
entertainment industries both in the past and in the ‘new economy’ environment, which will
be enriched by meetings with significant professional figures working in the world of
museums, foundations and international art trade.
The economics of the arts are an inter-disciplinary field of study that deals with the
application of economics to the production, distribution and consumption of all cultural goods
and services. Past contributions to cultural economics were focused mainly on public policy
issues, in particular the rationale for public subsidy and the evaluation of public expenditure,
but the interdisciplinary nature of this discipline and the growing interest in it expanded
research to broader areas of interest that combine economics with the sociological,
anthropological and historical point of view.
Aim of the course
By studying the theoretical and practical aspects of this field of study in the context of visual
arts, students will develop an understanding of the main topics and scope of the field and the
history, behavior and structure of the art market.
Students will be introduced to institutional networks that sustain and promote the art business,
the current art market and auction house environment.
Form of Assessment:
Grades will be composed of evaluations based on a mid-term and final exam (25%), 1
research paper of approx. 5 pages (approx 1,500 words; on a topic to be discussed with the
professor) and an Oral Presentation (20%), 1 journal (10%), 2 group projects (10%), and class
participation (10%). High grades will be awarded for work that demonstrates:
- good knowledge of course material
- critical judgment of views expressed in required reading and in extra reading for
research paper.
- the capacity to answer questions (on exams) concisely and to the point.
1. Research Paper: 20% , Paper DUE the day of the oral presentation
2. Journal: 10% Due the day of the final exam, pertaining Art Galleries and Auction
Houses visited during the course
3. Group Project 1: 10%, consists of an in-depth analysis of one aspect of the
contemporary art market through Ben Lewis documentary edited in 2009
4. Group Project 2: 10%, consists of an in-depth analysis of an art gallery from the ones
involved in the Biennale Internazionale dell’Antiquariato
108


Midterm examination: 20% consists of questions to be completed with short and
long essays answers
Final examination: 20%consists of questions to be completed with short and long
essays answers
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
REQUIRED READINGS
Readings to be done each week will be assigned from the Reading Packet, which includes
selections from:
Artist’s Resale Right, edited by Guido Candela and Antonello E.Scorcu, Allemandi & C.: Torino, 2010
S.THORNTON, Seven Days in the Art World, London:Granta, 2008
P.L.SACCO, Money for nothing?, from Art, Price and Value. Contemporary Art and the Market, catalogue of the
exhibition by F.Nori, P.Rossi, Firenze, CCCS, November 2008 – January 2009, Florence: Silvana, 2008
Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, edited by V.A.Ginsburgh and D.Throsby, Elsevier-North Holland,
2006 (ed.2008).
I.ROBERTSON, The Art Business, Routledge, 2008
LINDEMANN, A., Collecting contemporary, Taschen, 2006
O’MALLEY, M., The Business of Art, 2005
I.ROBERTSON, Understanding International Art Markets and Management, Routledge, 2005
VETHUIS, O., Talking Prices. Symbolic Meanings of Prices on the Market for Contemporary Art, Princeton and
Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2005
Gunnar Lind Haase Svendsen, "On the Wealth of Nations: Bourdieuconomics and Social Capital," Theory and
Society, Vol. 32, No. 5/6, (Dec., 2003), pp. 607-631
TOWSE, R., Handbook of Cultural Economics, Cheltenham, 2003
Economics of Art and Culture, Contributions to Economic Analysis, by V.A. Ginsburgh, 12th International
Conference of Cultural Economics International, vol.260, 2003
James Heilbrun and Charles M. Gray, The Economics of Art and Culture, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ.
Press, 2001)
B.FREY, Arts & Economics. Analysis of Cultural Policy, Springer, 2000
Tyler Cowen, In Praise of Commercial Culture (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press, 1998)
Bourdieu, P., The Field of Cultural Production, ed. Randal Johnson (New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1993)
MOSSETTO, G., Aesthetics and Economics, Kluwer, 1993
ABBOTT, S., Corporate Art Consulting, Paperback, 1992
FREY, B. AND POMMEREHNE, W., Muses and Markets. Explorations in the Economics of Art, Oxford: Basil
Blackwell, 1989
Grampp,W.D., Pricing the Priceless: Art, Artists, and Economics (New York: Basic Books, 1989)
O'Doherty, B., Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space. Berkeley, CA: Univ. of California Press,
1986 (web version http://www.societyofcontrol.com/whitecube/insidewc.htm)
P. Bourdieu, The Forms of Capital, in John G. Richardson, editor, Handbook of Theory and Research for the
Sociology of Education (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1986), 242-258.]
SINGER, L.P., Microeconomics of the Art Market, in «Journal of Cultural Economics», 2(1), 1978, pp.21-40
BAUMOL, W.J. AND BOWEN, W. G., Performing Arts. The Economic Dilemma, Cambridge Ma.: Twentieth Century
Fund, 1966
T.Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class, 1899
C.Mackay, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, 1841
Filmography
- Your Art World: A Documentary Series, presented by Sotheby’s, 2011 (http://yourartworld.sothebys.com/)
- Exit Through the Gift Shop, by Banksy, 2011
- Mona Lisa Curse by Robert Hughes, USA, 2009.
- The Great Art Market Bubble by Ben Lewis, UK, 2009.
- Herb & Dorthy (Veblen), by Megumi Sasaki, USA, 2008
- The Rape of Europa, by Lynn H. Nicholas | Robert M. Edsel | Bonni Cohen | Richard Berge
Nicole Newnham |
Jon Shenk | Josh Peterson | Marco d'Ambrosio | Joan Allen, USA, 2006
- America's Pop Collector: Robert C. Scull. Contemporary Art at Auction, by John Schott, E.J. Vaughn, 1974.
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Additional Readings may be given in hand-outs by individual professors throughout the
semester.
All of the assigned Readings should be studied each week in preparation for the class
meetings.
COURSE TIMETABLE
Week 1 - Boundaries and Bridges – Forms of Capital
Monday 16 January
 Business of Art, Art as Business or Business through Art
 methodologies approaching the analysis of the art markets and the current
bibliography
 Forms of capital
Readings: S.THORNTON, Seven Days in the Art World, London: Granta, 2008, pp. xi-xix; P.
Bourdieu, The Forms of Capital, in John G. Richardson, editor, Handbook of Theory and
Research for the Sociology of Education (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1986), 242-258.
Wed 18 January
Lab activity – 1 – Group Project
The Great Contemporary Art Bubble, by Ben Lewis, United Kingdom, 2009.
Readings: excerpts from T.Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class, 1899 and C.Mackay,
Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, 1841, vol.I.
Week 2 - Value + Bus Org, Customer Value Proposition
Monday 23 January
 Cultural, Artistic, Material, Symbolic value
 “conspicuous consumption”: an economic and social engine
Readings: R.MCCAIN, Defining Cultural and Artistic Goods, in Handbook of the Economics
of Art and Culture, edited by V.A.Ginsburgh and D.Throsby, Elsevier-North Holland, 2006
(ed.2008), pp. 147-165.
On the Wealth of Nations: Bourdieuconomics and Social
Capital, Theory and Society, Vol. 32, No. 5/6, (Dec., 2003), pp. 607-631.
Wed 25 January
Lab activity – 2 – Group Project ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION
Week 3 - Contemporary Art Market Environment+ The Globalized Network
Monday 30 January
 Stakeholder relationships in the market for contemporary art
Readings: D.CHONG, Stakeholder relationships in the market for contemporary art, and
J.Jeffri, Managing uncertainty: the visual art market for contemporary art in the United
States, in I. ROBERTSON, Understanding International Art Markets and Management,
Routledge, 2005, ch.5, 7, pp. 84-102; 146-170 .
Wed 1 February
Business Organizations and Customer Value Proposition: The Museum/The Contemporary
Auction House/The Art Advisory and Investment Fund Group
Case studies
 British Museum, London
(http://www.britishmuseum.org/the_museum/management/museum_strategy.aspx)
 Sotheby’s Auction House (http://www.sothebys.com/en.html)
 The Fine Art Fund Group (http://www.thefineartfund.com)
Week 4 - Art Business Strategic Planning
Monday 6 February
 Strategic Planning through:
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o Corporate Museums
o Museums: from Europe to Arab Emirates [http://www.saadiyat.ae/en/]
Readings: D.Chong, Marketing in art business: exchange relationships by commercial
galleries and public art museums, in The Art Business, Routledge, 2008, pp. 115-138;
J.Seligson, Corporate Culture? One Part Education, One Part Sales: This is the Corporate
Museum, retrieved October 2011 [download at: http://aam-us.org/pubs/mn/corporateculture.cfm]
Wed 8 February
Class visit: Ferragamo Museum (http://www.museoferragamo.it/en/index.php)
Week 5 - Marketing Basics
Monday 13 February
 Marketing Basics through:
o Louvre- Louvre Abu Dhabi
o Guggenheim as a Globalized Brand
o Fashion Firms involved in Art Business
Readings: B.FREY E S.MEYER, The Economics of Museums, in Handbook of the Economics of
Art and Culture, edited by V.A.Ginsburgh and D.Throsby, Elsevier-North Holland, 2006
(ed.2008), pp.1017-1042; B. FREY, Arts & Economics. Analysis of Cultural Policy, Springer,
2000, pp.35-47, 95-104 (to be read only)
Wed 15 February
Class visit: Gucci Museum
(http://www.gucci.com/it/worldofgucci/mosaic/think_forever/gucci_museo)
Week 6 – Contemporary Art Market II
Monday 20 February
 Established and Emerging art markets: the West Block (London/NYC) - The East
(Middle and Far)
Readings: I.ROBERSTON, A New Art from Emerging Markets, Lund Humphries 2011; Id.,
V.L.Tseng, S.Singh, ‘Chindia’ as art market opportunity, in The Art Business, Routledge,
2008, pp.82-96
Wed 22 February
Case Studies:
 Brazilian Art Market
 Chinese Art Market (watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWO40m3x1GQ)
 Indian Art Market
See: BRIC’s theme Sale at Phillis de Pury http://www.phillipsdepury.com/press/2011/bricauction-after-sale.aspx?year=2011, ArtTactic Report 2011, http://www.arttactic.com/viewreport.php?type=reports_other&id=74)
Watch: Lecture on the emerging art markets given by I.ROBERSTON on the opening of the
exhibition “Masters of Chinese Photography” at Poligono Gallery, Marbella in July 2011 (1,
2, 3 parts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufu5tFgzl-I)
Week 7 (27 February – 1 March)
Mid-term Exams
Week 8 (21 -30)
Mid-term Break
Week 9 - Art Markets Histories and Spaces
Monday 12 March
 From the Low Countries in XV century to America in XX century.
Readings: N. DE MARCHI-H. VAN MIEGROET, The History of Art Markets, in Handbook of
the Economics of Art and Culture, edited by V.A.Ginsburgh and D.Throsby, Elsevier-North
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Holland, 2006 (ed.2008), pp. 69-116.
Wednesday 14 March
Class Visits: Contemporary Art Galleries and Antique Shops
The White Cube vs. The Patrician House
Readings: B. O'Doherty, Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space,
Berkeley, CA: Univ. of California Press, 1986
(web version at http://www.societyofcontrol.com/whitecube/insidewc.htm)
Week 10 - Old Masters Environment
Monday 19 March
 Old Masters exhibition, validation and sale
o The recent collapse of a formerly successful market
o Heritage protection effects art markets in Europe and United States
o Unesco (http://www.unesco.org)
Readings: A. HOPE, Supply and demand in the Old Masters picture market, and P.BOYLAN,
Illicit Art Trade, in I.ROBERTSON, Understanding International Art Markets and
Management, Routledge, 2005, ch.10,11, pp. 195 – 213, 216-227
Wednesday 21 March
 Antique Dealers selling strategies in the past and in the new millennium
o Case Studies: London, New York, Tefaf - Maastricht
Readings: ADAA Collector’s Guide to Working with Art Dealers, Art Dealers Association in
America (download: www.artdealers.org/collectorsguide.html ); see The British Antiques
Dealers Association (http://www.bada.org/)
Watch: http://online.wsj.com/video/news-hub-why-old-masters-are-like-bonds/F12127030836-4082-8FDC-6CA88C77CEF2.html ; Fake or Fortune by Fiona Bruce with art expert
Philip Mould http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0125by8#clips)
Week 11 – Laws and Taxes Effects
Monday 26 March
 The economic impact of art law
 Import and export legislation within western world
 Heritage protection (Carnet ATA) and copyright protection
 the Droit de suite: Europe and US (a community-wide resale royalty right)
Readings:R.PFISTER, Tax matters, in I.ROBERTSON, Understanding International Art Markets
and Management, Routledge, 2005, ch.6, 103 – 122; W.M.LANDES, D.B.LEVINE, The
Economic Analysis of Art Law, in Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, edited by
V.A.Ginsburgh and D.Throsby, Elsevier-North Holland, 2006 (ed.2008), pp. 211-250
Wednesday 28 March
Laws and Taxes application: Buying Michelangelo in Italy, Maurizio Cattelan in London,
Mark Rothko in New York. Moving all to Hong Kong.
Readings: G. Candela - A.E.Scorcu, The Economics of the Artist’s Resale Right (ARR), in
Artist’s Resale Right, edited by Guido Candela and Antonello E.Scorcu, Allemandi & C.:
Torino, 2010, pp.36-65.
Week 12 – Art at Auction
Monday 2 April
 Auction House structure, functioning and strategies
 The Auction system.
 Developing an auction sale: appraisals/marketing strategies/catalogue
Readings:[ http://www.sothebys.com/help/welcome.html and
http://www.sothebys.com/help/ref/ref_liveterms.html],[http://www.christies.com/features/wel
come/]; ASHENFELTER O., GRADDY K., Art Auctions, CEPS Working Paper No. 203, 2010,
pp.1-15 [ www.princeton.edu/ceps/workingpapers/203ashenfelter.pdf]
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Wednesday 4 April
Class Visit: Auction Preview
Agents involved: Target Collectors, Auctioneers, Auction Houses Objectives
Watch: - Your Art World: A Documentary Series, presented by Sotheby’s, 2011
(http://yourartworld.sothebys.com/); excerpts from R.Florida, The Rise of Creative Class,
2002, and analysis of http://www.creativeclass.com/
Week 13 - Art Market and Internet
Monday 9 April
 Visual arts in the ‘new economy’
 Internet environment and the arts
Readings: W.J.BAUMOL, The Arts in the “New Economy”, in Handbook of the Economics of
Art and Culture, edited by V.A. Ginsburgh and D. Throsby, Elsevier-North Holland, 2006
(ed.2008), pp. 339-357; J. FARCHY, Internet: culture, F.Rochelandet, Internet: economics, in
Handbook of Cultural Economics, edited by TOWSE, R., Cheltenham, 2003, pp.276-280, 281286.
Wednesday 11 April
 Live Auctions and personalized choices. Case Studies:
http://www.liveauctioneers.com/
http://www.sothebys.com
http://www.christies.com/
http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/
Week 14 Globalization
Monday 16 April
The Globalized Network: Art Fairs and Art Shows validating art: ArtBasel, Tefaf -Maastricht,
Kassel Documenta, Venice Biennale
Case studies: East-West/Old Masters-Contemporary (www.artbasel.com; www.tefaf.com;
http://www.hongkongartfair.com)
Wednesday 18 April
Oral Presentation and discussion session 1 (RESEARCH PAPER DUE)
Week 15 Instruments
Monday 23 April
 Portals, Art Market Databases and Price Indices
 http://www.artnet.com/ (free access)
 http://www.artprice.com/ (limited access)
 http://www.arttactic.com/ (free access)
 http://www.arcadja.com/auctions/en/ (limited access)
 http://www.artasanasset.com/main/ (limited access)
Readings: Frey, B. and Pommerehne, W., Muses and Markets. Explorations in the Economics
of Art, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1989, pp. 101-118; D.SAGOT-DUVAUROUX, Art Prices, in
Handbook of Cultural Economics, edited by TOWSE, R., Cheltenham, 2003, pp. 57-63.
Wednesday 25 April
 Fine Art Funds: How do they work?
o http://www.fineartwealthmgt.com/
o http://www.thefineartfund.com/
Readings: S. Reyburn, Brazil Art Price Surge Lures Billionaires to $24.4 Million Fund,
Bloomberg, May 16, 2011
Week 16 (May 3-6)
Final Exams
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Family Business in Italy
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Diletta Frescobaldi, Laurea
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
Site Visit fee: $ 85
Email: [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will trace the origins, development, and characteristics of family firms with
special emphasis on the impact that they have had on the social, political and economic life of
Italy. Moving from the historical overview to the current situation, consideration will be
given to changes and trends in family firms, international strategies, and the challenges of
global competition. Attention will also be given to the different typologies of family firms,
values and principles, and critical challenges for continuity, with an analysis of successful and
unsuccessful cases. The course will also present case studies in various Italian sectors such as
wine and food, gold, textile, fashion, paper, automobile and others. Field trips to family firms
in various Italian sectors are an integral part of the course.
OBJECTIVES
The aim of the course is to provide the students with a general knowledge of the fundamental
role of the Italian family firm from the past to recent days, learning the characteristics that
differentiate family business from other kinds of business.
Familiarizing students with some of the most important Italian family companies, their
history, issues that they need to face today, their influence into the social, political,
economical life and future perspectives. Students will identify, comprehend, and develop
solutions for challenges faced by family businesses.
Students will have the opportunity to examine the life cycles of family businesses and of their
founders.
REQUIREMENTS
The student is required to do the assigned readings before class and be prepared to discuss
them during the lessons. Punctuality is essential and any students who is excessively late
without a valid reason, will be not admitted to the class.
TEACHING METHOD
The class will be conducted in a way that will encourage the active participation of the
students in the discussion on the topics of the day.
It will include lectures, discussions, guest speakers, site visits, interviews, student projects and
assigned readings.
ATTENDANCE / ABSENCE POLICY/ PARTICIPATION
Class attendance is mandatory and counts towards the final grade. Each absence from class
will negatively impact your final grade.
 Starting with the third absence the instructor may lower the final grade by one letter
grade.
 With the fourth absence the student may receive an Automatic Failure.
TESTS - ASSIGNMENTS – SOURCES
ASSIGNMENTS – Each student is expected to write 2 papers/projects of about circa 6 pages.
Topics must be selected in agreement with the instructor. The papers are due on 1 st February
and 16th April. Late papers will receive a drop in grade. More details will be given in class.
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The papers/projects must be printed in hard copy and sent via e-mail in a Word file (and
Power point) to the teacher. The grade for the paper will be based on the content and format
(sources, etc,) (80%) and on a brief presentation you will give to the class (20 %)
summarizing your topics and/or interesting findings.
EVALUATION / GRADING SYSTEM
10% attendance
10% class participation
20% Projects and presentation
25% mid-term exam
10% Case work and in-class work
25% final exam
A 93–100
A- 89-92
B+ 87-89
B 83-86 B- 80-82
C 73-76 C- 70-72
D 60-69
F 0-59
C+ 77-79
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
TEXT READINGS
The required text book for this course is:
Frank Hoy, Pramodita Sharma. Entrepreneurial family firms, Pearson, 2010
Whenever necessary students will also be provided with other sources during class. Important
bibliography is the following:
“The future of family business” in Family Business News, January 2007
“The world’s oldest family companies”, in Family Business Magazine, February 2007
Poza Ernesto, Family Business, Canada, Thompson South-Western, 2001 (chapt 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11)
Andrea Colli, The history of family business, il Mulino (chap 1-4)
Andrea Colli, Capitalismo familiare, il Mulino (chapt. 4)
Harold James, Family Capitalism (introduction, chap. 3-6-9-10-14)
David Landes, Dynasties, 2006, Penguin Book (introduction, chap. 5)
Gersick Kelin, John Davis, Marion Hampton, Ivan Lansberg, Generation to generation: Life cycles of
the family business, Boston, Harvard Business press (chap. 1-2)
Federigo Melis, L’azienda nel Medioevo, a cura di Mario Spallanzani, Le Monnier Firenze 1991
R. Goldthwaithe, Private wealth in Renaissance Florence: a study of 4 families
R. de Roover, Rise and decline of the Medici. Il banco Medici a Firenze, La nuova Italia
J. Mantle, Benetton, the family, the business, the brand, 2000 Warner Book
A. Friedmann, Agnelli and the network of Italian power, 1988 Mandarin Paperback
D. Gross, Greatest business stories of all time, 1996 Wiley
Sara Forden, The case of Gucci, the history of a Family, 2001 Harper
Salvatore Ferragamo, The Shoemaker dream
J. L. Ward, Unconventional Wisdom, Wiley 1989
J. L. Ward, Perpetuating the Family Business, Palgrave 2004
J. E. Hughes, Family Wealth, Bloomberg Press, 2004
The Family Business Review, vol. XVII, n.1 Blackwell, 2004
www.familybusinessmagazine.com
Les Henokiens web site
The Family Business Institute web site
Note: There will be a number of family business cases available in the library. Among the
cases study to be studied are the following: Ferragamo, Pucci, Gucci, Ducati, Parmalat,
Frescobaldi, Antinori, Barilla, Illy Cafè, Benetton, Agnelli, Bulgari, Torrini.
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FINAL EXAM / FINAL PAPER
There will be two exams, a mid term and a final. The final exam will be based on everything
studied throughout the semester, including required readings. The exams will be a
combination of multiple choices, short answer and an essay question.
CLASS SCHEDULE
Week 1
Lect.
January 16th, Mon.
1
Presentation of the course; introduction to the class syllabus and materials to be
used during the course, assignments and exam.
Introduction to the Italian family business: definition, role, importance, aspects,
difficulties. .
Lect.
January 18th,Wed.
2
Different typologies of the Italian family firm and their competitive strategies:
walking tour and visit of the Farmacia di Santa Maria Novella and its museum,
meeting with the owner. The case will present an interesting evolution of historical
family firm.
Week 2
Lect.
January 23rd, Mon.
3
Origins of the Italian family firms. Development of commerce during the Middle
Age and Renaissance; starting of the business for some important Italian family
firm. Role of the families from the Italian industrial revolution to recent days.
Families life cycle stages.
Movie on the historical enterprises of Florence.
Lect.
January 25th, Wed.
4
Visit of the production site of Santa Maria Novella. Meeting with the CEO.
Week 3
Lect.
January 30th, Mon.
5
Leading the family business and the transfer of power.
The association “Les Henokiens” and the association of the historical Companies
in Florence.
Lect.
February 1st , Wed.
6
Site visit to the Ferragamo Palace and Museum.
Family Culture and values. Responsibilities of family business in term of Art and
Culture; the creation of museums.
Business Life cycle stages.
Week 4
Lect.
February 6th , Mon.
7
Review of the Ferragamo Harvard case.
Resources for starting and managing the family firm.
Lect.
February 7th, Wed.
8
Visit of the Gucci museum. The importance of family business archive.
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Which will be the future of the company: family or not family owned.
Week 5
Lect. 9 February 13th, Mon.
The Barilla Family Business. Presentation of the case study Academia Barilla by
the CEO. It is a special institution created by Barilla to promote Italian food culture
abroad.
Lect.10 February 15th, Wed.
Review of Barilla case study.
Oral presentation of Papers/Projects by the students. Suggested title will be given
in class.
Note
Students will be asked to write a page on the Academia Barilla with their
suggestions.
Week 6
Lect.11 February 20th, Mon.
Movie the Corporation: family business and ethics in a global context.
Other movies on family business.
Lect.12 February 22nd, Wed.
The Italian Gold industry. Site visit to Torrini and Craftsmen of the Oltrarno in
Florence.
Note
Students will be asked to write an essay on the movie and on the visit
Week 7
Lect.13 February 27th, Mon.
Review for mid term exam.
Lect.14 February 29th, Wed.
Mid term exam
MID TERM BREAK
Week 8
Lect.15 March 12th, Mon.
Event Taste at the Stazione Leopolda. Tasting of the “Eccellenze” of food/wine of
Italy.
The Italian food sector and some important producers. The influence of the Italian
territory with its culture and history. Importance of tourism and hospitality.
Lect.16 March 14th, Wed.
Critical role of nonfamily managers.
Starting the family business venture.
Note
Students will be asked to write an essay on the event, selecting a product and 3
producers.
Week 9
Lect.17 March 20th, Mon.
Visit to the Residential club of Palazzo Tornabuoni. Introduction by a member of
the family Frattini to the business idea of RDM (Real Estate Management).
Particular focus will be given to the evolution of family business.
The maturing family venture.
Lect.18 March 22th, Wed.
Introduction to the Italian wine sector. Innovation and tradition.
Case Study: Frescobaldi and other producers
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Movie Mondovino first part and other movies on Family Business
Lect.19 March 23rd, Frid.
The Frescobaldi family business. Site visit to two wine estates of Frescobaldi:
Pomino and Nipozzano; details will be given in class.
Week 10
March 26th, Mon.
No class, because visit to wine estates on March 23rd . Self study activities.
Lect.20 March 28th, Wed.
Decline, degeneration or regeneration.
The business of Stefano Ricci and the acquisition of the Antico Setificio Fiorentino.
Week 11
Lect.21 April 2nd, Mon.
Governance tool kit for entrepreneurial family firms.
Lect.22 April 4th, Wed.
Case studies analysis and quiz
Week 12
Lect.23 April 9th, Mon.
No class. Eastern Holiday.
Lect.24 April 12th, Thu.
Secret recipes of entrepreneurial family firms.
Leading the evolution. Future scenario of Family Business.
Globalization issues: how can a family company compete in a global scenario.
Week 13
Lect.25 April 16th, Mon.
Oral presentation of Final Papers by the students.
Suggested title: The Italian automotive. From the economic miracle to present
days. Future scenario.
Case study: Ducati, Agnelli, Alessi, Parmalat, Lavazza
Lect.26 April 18th, Thu.
Oral presentation of Final Papers by the students.
Suggested title: The Italian steal industry and other important sectors for the
Italian family firm.
Case Study: K.M.E., Falk, Fabriano, Benetton, Bulgari
Week 14
Lect.27 April 23rd, Mon.
Comment and review on students’ projects.
Other cases of Italian family Business.
Lect.28 April 25th, Thu.
Review of cases and quiz.
Week 15
Lect.29 April 30th, Mon.
Final review
Lect.30 May 2nd, Thu.
Final exam
118
The Florence Experience I: Beginning Italian I
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructors: Italian Faculty
Contact hrs/wk: 4 per week
Prerequisite: None
Site visit fee: $ 45
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES
The Florence Experience I is an interdisciplinary course which focuses on achieving a basic
level in cultural and linguistic-communicative competences (speaking, writing, reading and
understanding) regarding familiar contexts, everyday life's activities and simple interaction
with native speakers, while introducing the students to various, relevant aspects of
contemporary Florentine life and Italian culture. The course offers students an
interdisciplinary experience in language learning made possible only by direct immersion in
the target culture. Since language and culture are deeply connected (language IS culture and
culture IS language), each class will introduce students to linguistic skills such as
communicative structures, grammar structures, vocabulary and pronunciation, but will, at the
same time, provide them with a deeper knowledge of Italian culture. The city of Florence
becomes a cultural laboratory: with its world-famous fashion concerns, its beautiful theaters
and lively markets, its young writers and actors, and its characteristic stores and artisans’
workshops, it is a composite of contemporary Italian culture to be explored by the student.
In addition to classroom work, the course includes a series of on-site encounters, which will
range from interviews with various exponents of Florentine society, to encounters with young
Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances; field-trips and treasure hunts at the
most vivacious markets in town, and encounters with students of the University of Florence.
Students will encounter the author Camilla Trinchieri, who will conduct with them an
interactive dialogue about translation of excerpts from her recent book Cercando Alice.
Students will translate selections from the novel during the first part of the semester, and they
will subsequently meet the author.
REQUIREMENTS
Textbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 1. Italian Course for English Speakers.
Textbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2006
Workbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 1. Workbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2006
Supplementary Text: selected exercises and readings excerpted from other language texts
and workbooks, in addition to activities and handouts created by instructors.
Homework: Outside of class time, students are expected to review subsequently, and
complete all the exercises assigned by the instructor.
Class Participation: Extremely important due to the peculiar characteristics of a
LANGUAGE and CULTURE course where interaction and active participation are the basis
of all of the classes.
Write-ups: Students will have to write a range of one page write-ups on topics assigned by
the instructor. Please note that all write-ups are due on the due date.
Tests: There will be 4 one-hour exams designed to verify students’ ability to listen,
comprehend, and write in Italian. The second test is the Mid-term Exam, and the fourth test is
the Final Exam. (NO MAKE-UP TESTS)
Absences: A maximum of 2 class day absences will be accepted. Additional absences will be
excused only at display of a doctor’s note or they will bring the final grade down – a grade
per absence. Ex: 3 absences, A– becomes B+; 4 absences, B– becomes C.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Tests (1 and 3)
Write-ups
20%
15%
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*Class Participation (incl. Homework)
20%
Mid-term Exam (Test 2)
20%
Final Exam (Test 4)
25%
*(Participation Breakdown: Attention in Class; Motivation; Class Interaction - with
Classmates and Teacher; Homework /Tutorial Attendance – if assigned;
Punctuality)*
B+ = 89 – 87 C+ = 79 - 77 D+ = 69 – 67 F = 59 – 0
A = 100 – 93 B = 86 – 83
C = 76 – 73 D = 66 – 63
A– = 92 – 90 B– = 82 – 80 C– = 72 – 70 D– = 62 – 60
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE
 Prima settimana: 16– 19 gennaio
Unitá 1, Primi Contatti / Unitá 2, Buon appetito!
Communicative functions: Greeting people / Introducing yourself / Asking
pronunciation, spelling and meaning of a word / Nationalities / Ordering at the bar
Grammar: The verbs essere , avere and chiamarsi / Adjectives of nationality /
Regular verbs: first and second person singular / Numbers 0 - 20 / Nouns ending in –o
and –a
Esercizi: dalle Unità 1 e 2

Seconda settimana: 23-26 gennaio
Unitá 2, Buon appetito! Unità 10 Sapori d’Italia
Communicative functions: Ordering at the restaurant and at the bar/ Asking for the
check / Asking prices / Grocery shopping / Describing food and eating habits / More
on grocery shopping
Grammar: Questo e Quello / Nouns ending in –e / Definite article / Indefinite article /
Numbers 20 - 100
Esercizi dalla Unità 2 e dalla Unità 10
 Terza settimana: 30 gennaio – 2 febbraio
Unitá 3, Io e gli altri
Communicative functions: Introducing someone / Asking and giving personal details
/ Talking about work / Speaking formally
Grammar: Regular verbs of the first conjugation: - are / Simple prepositions (a – in –
da - di) / Formal and informal communication / Verb – fare and idiomatic expressions
with fare / Nouns of professions / Numbers from 100 onwards
Esercizi: dalla Unità 3
First Encounter

Quarta settimana: 6-9 febbraio
Unitá 4, Tempo libero
Communicative functions: Talking about spare time activities in Italy and in the
United States / Expressing preferences / Talking about how often you do something
Grammar: Verbs andare e stare / Present tense of regular verbs in –ere and –ire /
Verbs sapere e conoscere / Adverbs of frequency / Verb piacere / Wh- words: asking
questions
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 4
120
TEST 1 (Giovedì 9 febbraio)

Quinta settimana: 13-16 febbraio
Unitá 5, In giro per l’Italia
Communicative functions: Asking and giving directions / Asking and telling the time
/ Describing a place
Grammar: Irregular verbs / Adjectives of the first group (ending with -o) and
adjectives of the second group (ending with -e) / C'è, ci sono
Esercizi:dalla Unità 5

Sesta settimana: 20-23 febbraio
General review and selected activities from Unità 11, Fare acquisti and Unità 13,
Non è bello ciò che è bello...
Communicative functions: Describing someone (looks and personality) / Talking
about clothes and fashion
Grammar: Adjectives of appearance and personality
Esercizi: a cura dell'insegnante
Second Encounter

Settima settimana: 27 febbraio – 1 marzo
Mid-term Examinations (TEST 2 TBA)
Mid-term Break: 2 – 11 marzo

Ottava settimana: 12-15 marzo
Unitá 7, Un fine settimana
Communicative functions: Talking about a trip / Describing past events
Grammar: Past tense of regular verbs with essere and avere / Past time expressions
Esercizi: dalla Unità 7
Third Encounter

Nona settimana: 18-22 marzo
Unitá 7, Un fine settimana
Communicative functions: Describing past events / Talking about the weather
Grammar: Past tense of irregular verbs / Adverbs of time (giá, appena, non ancora)
Esercizi: dalla Unità 7
Fourth Encounter

Decima settimana: 26-29 marzo
Unità 6, In albergo
Communicative functions: Talking about things one must – would like to – can do
Grammar: Modal verbs (volere – potere – dovere – sapere) / Bene-buono / Malecattivo
Esercizi: dalla Unità 6
Fifth Encounter

Undicesima settimana: 2-5 aprile
Unitá 9, La famiglia
Communicative functions: Family relationships / Describing your family / Comparing
the typical American and Italian family
Grammar: Possessive adjectives / Possessive adjectives with words denoting family
relationships
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 9
.
121
Sixth Encounter
TEST 3 (Giovedì 5 aprile)

Dodicesima settimana: 10-12 aprile (9 aprile: Lunedì dell’Angelo. l’Istituto è
chiuso)
Unitá 8, Vita quotidiana
Communicative functions: Talking about the daily routine / Describing a typical day /
Holidays and traditions
Grammar: Present tense of reflexive verbs / Direct object pronouns with present tense
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 8
Seventh Encounter

Tredicesima settimana: 16-19 aprile
General review

Quattordicesima settimana: 23-26 aprile
General review
Progressive Test

Quindicesima settimana: 30 aprile – 3maggio
Final Examinations (TEST 4: TBA)
The progression of the on-site encounters will be decided by the instructor according to
public structures' opening hours and other practical matters. During the semester,
students will be involved in the following encounters:










At the market. Encounter with delicatessen sellers, butchers, fruit and fish vendors at
the vivacious Mercato Centrale who will tell students about their products.
Students will interview three persons belonging to various social and cultural contexts
in the commercial district of Florence.
The city's meeting point par excellence: the Florentine coffee houses or “bar”.
Encounter with Italian students of the University of Florence in class (two or more
encounters)
Studying in Florence. Encounter with students at the University of Florence
(Department of Literature and Philosophy) who will show the American students
around the school and will discuss the differences between university education in
Italy and the United States.
Treasure hunt in the commercial district of the city of Florence.
Italians' passion for food: dinner or lunch at a typical Florentine trattoria.
Encounter with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances (two
encounters).
Students will meet and interact with elderly Italians from two historical quarters of
Florence (San Frediano and Santo Spirito). These historic districts are rich in culture
and full of tradition, and the visitors will provide an insightful look into this world.
Camilla Trinchieri, author of Cercando Alice (Marcos y Marcos, Milano 2010) will
conduct a dialogue with the students about translation using excepts from her novel.
This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor might decide to add or change one or more
on-site encounters during the semester.
122
The Florence Experience II: Beginning Italian II
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructors: Italian Faculty
Contact hrs/wk: 4 per week
Prerequisite: One semester of Italian
Site visit fee: $ 45
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES
The Florence Experience II is an interdisciplinary course which builds on one semester of
previous work. It focuses on achieving a post-basic level in cultural and linguisticcommunicative competences regarding familiar matters, personal experiences, studies, work
and daily routine, while introducing students to various, relevant aspects of contemporary
Florentine life and Italian culture. Students will develop communicative skills in order to
easily make themselves understood and understand during interaction with native speakers.
The course offers students an interdisciplinary experience in language learning made possible
only by direct immersion in the target culture. Since language and culture are deeply
connected (language IS culture and culture IS language), each class will introduce students to
linguistic skills such as communicative structures, grammar structures, vocabulary and
pronunciation, but will, at the same time, provide them with a deeper knowledge of Italian
culture. The city of Florence becomes a cultural laboratory: with its world-famous fashion
concerns, its beautiful theaters and lively markets, its young writers and actors, and its
characteristic stores and artisans’ workshops, it is a composite of contemporary Italian culture
to be explored by the student. In addition to classroom work, the course includes a series of
on-site encounters, which will range from interviews with various exponents of Florentine
society, to encounters with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances;
field-trips and treasure hunts at the most vivacious markets in town, and encounters with
students of the University of Florence. Students will encounter the author Camilla Trinchieri,
who will conduct with them an interactive dialogue about translation of excerpts from her
recent book Cercando Alice. Students will translate selections from the novel during the first
part of the semester, and they will subsequently meet the author.
REQUIREMENTS
Textbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 1. Italian Course for English
Speakers.Textbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2006;
Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2. Italian Course for English Speakers. Textbook, Alma
Edizioni – Firenze 2007
Workbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 1. Workbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2006;
Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2. Workbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2007.
Supplementary Text: selected exercises and readings excerpted from other language texts
and workbooks, activities, and handouts created by instructors.
Homework: Outside of class time, students are expected to review subsequently, and
complete all the exercises assigned by the instructor.
Class Participation: Extremely important due to the peculiar characteristics of a
LANGUAGE and CULTURE course where interaction and active participation are the basis
of all of the classes.
Write- ups: Students will have to write a series of one page write-ups about what they
experienced during the on-site encounters and on topics assigned by the instructor. Please
note that all write-ups are due on the due date.
Tests: There will be 4 one-hour exams designed to verify students’ ability to listen,
comprehend, and write in Italian. The second test is the Mid-term Exam, and the fourth test is
the Final Exam. (NO MAKE-UP TESTS)
123
Absences: A maximum of 2 class day absences will be accepted. Additional absences will be
excused only at display of a doctor’s note or they will bring the final grade down – a grade
per absence. Ex: 3 absences, A– becomes B+; 4 absences, B– becomes C.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Tests (1 and 3)
20%
Write-ups
15%
*Class Participation (incl. Homework)
20%
Mid-term Exam (Test 2)
20%
Final Exam (Test 4)
25%
*(Participation Breakdown: Attention in Class; Motivation; Class Interaction - with
Classmates and Teacher; Homework /Tutorial Attendance – if assigned;
Punctuality)*
A = 100 – 93
A– = 92 –90
B+ = 89 – 87
B = 86 – 83
B– = 82 –80
C+ = 79 - 77
C = 76 – 73
C– = 72 70
D+ = 69 – 67
D = 66 – 63
D– = 62 –60
F = 59 – 0
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE
 Prima settimana: 16-19 gennaio
From Italian Espresso 1: Review: Unitá 4, Tempo libero / Unitá 5, In giro per
l’Italia / Unitá 6, In albergo
Communicative functions: Talking about leisure time / Expressing likes and
preferences / Describing places / Booking a hotel room
Grammar: Present tense of regular and irregular verbs / The verb piacere /Simple
prepositions / Adjectives / Question words / Modal verbs
Esercizi: dalle Unità 4, 5 e 6
Progressive Test

Seconda settimana: 23-26 gennaio
Review: Unitá 7, Un fine settimana / Unitá 8, Vita quotidiana / Unitá 9, La famiglia
Communicative functions: Talking about past events / Describing a typical day and
daily routine / Describing your family
Grammar: Passato prossimo of regular and irregular verbs / Past time expressions /
Reflexive verbs in the present and past tense / Possessive adjectives
Esercizi: dalle Unità 7 e 8

Terza settimana: 30 gennaio – 2 febbraio
Unitá 11, Fare acquisti / Unitá 12, Da piccola
Communicative functions: Clothing / Shopping for clothes / Making polite requests /
Expressing tastes / Talking about childhood / Talking about habitual activities in the
past
Grammar: Indirect object pronouns / Use of indirect and direct pronouns / The
adjective quello / Past tense: Imperfetto
Esercizi: dalle Unità 11 e 12
First Encounter
124

Quarta settimana: 6-9 febbraio
Unitá 12, Da piccola / Unitá 13, Non è bello ció che è bello…
Communicative functions: Describing past situations / Giving someone’s physical
description / Giving a description of someone’s personality / Making comparisons
Grammar: The use of the imperfetto compared to the passato prossimo /
Comparatives and superlatives
Esercizi: dalle Unitá 12 e 13
TEST 1 (Giovedì 9 febbraio)

Quinta settimana: 13-16 febbraio
Unitá 13, Non è bello ció che è bello…
Communicative functions: Expressing wishes / Making polite requests / Describing a
house
Grammar: Present conditional / Use of the conditional
Esercizi: dalla Unità 13

Sesta settimana: 20-23 febbraio
Unità 14, Appuntamenti
Communicative functions: Organizing leisure activities / Making invitations /
Accepting and refusing invitations
Grammar: More about the conditional / Present progressive with the verb stare
Esercizi: dalla Unità 14
Second Encounter

Settima settimana: 27 febbraio – 1 marzo
Mid-term Examinations (TEST 2: TBA)
Mid-term Break: 2 – 11 marzo

Ottava settimana: 12-15 marzo
Unitá 14, Appuntamenti
Communicative functions: Talking about good and bad manners / Talking about an
upleasant experience
Grammar: Agreement of the past participle with the direct pronouns / Direct, indirect
and reflexive pronouns with modal verbs
Esercizi: dalla Unità 14
Third Encounter

Nona settimana: 19-22 marzo
From Italian Espresso 2: Unitá 1, Incontri / Unitá 2, Progetti futuri
Communicative functions: Talking about past events / Talking about future plans
Grammar: Passato prossimo of modal verbs / Describing a past situation with the
passato prossimo and the imperfetto / The preposition fra with future meaning
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 1
Fourth Encounter

Decima settimana: 26-29 marzo
Unitá 2, Progetti futuri
Communicative functions: Talking about the future / Making hypothesis / Writing a
résume
Grammar: Future tense / The use of the future compared to the present tense
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 2
Fifth Encounter
125

Undicesima settimana: 2-5 aprile
Unitá 3, L’importante è mangiar bene
Communicative functions: Give advice / Ask for advice / Comparing eating habits in
Italy and in the USA
Grammar: Informal imperative of regular and irregular verbs / Use of the conditional
and the imperative to give advice
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 3
Sixth Encounter
TEST 3 (Giovedì 5 aprile)

Dodicesima settimana: 10-12 aprile (9 aprile: Lunedì dell’Angelo. l’Istituto è
chiuso)
Unitá 3, L’importante è mangiar bene / Unitá 4, Mens sana
Communicative functions: The human body / At the doctor’s: talking about sickness /
Giving advice in a formal situation
Grammar: Position of the pronouns with the informal imperative / Formal imperative
Esercizi: dalle Unitá 3 e 4
Seventh Encounter

Tredicesima settimana: 16-19 aprile
General review
Esercizi: a cura dell’insegnante

Quattordicesima settimana: 23-26 aprile
General review
Progressive Test

Quindicesima settimana: 30 aprile – 3 maggio
Final Examinations (TEST 4: TBA)
The progression of the on-site encounters will be decided by the instructor according to public
structures' opening hours and other practical matters. During the semester, students will be
involved in the following encounters:
 At the market. Encounter with delicatessen sellers, butchers, fruit and fish vendors at the vivacious
Mercato Centrale who will tell students about their products.
 Students will interview three persons belonging to various social and cultural contexts in the
commercial district of Florence.
 The city's meeting point par excellence: the Florentine coffee houses or “bar”.
 Encounter with Italian students of the University of Florence in class (two or more encounters)
 Studying in Florence. Encounter with students at the University of Florence (Department of
Literature and Philosophy) who will show the American students around the school and will
discuss the differences between university education in Italy and the United States.
 Treasure hunt in the commercial district of the city of Florence.
 Italians' passion for food: dinner or lunch at a typical Florentine trattoria
 Encounter with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances (two encounters)
 Students will meet and interact with elderly Italians from two historical quarters of Florence (San
Frediano and Santo Spirito). These historic districts are rich in culture and full of tradition, and the
visitors will provide an insightful look into this world.
 Camilla Trinchieri, author of Cercando Alice (Marcos y Marcos, Milano 2010) will conduct a
dialogue with the students about translation using excepts from her novel.
This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor might decide to add or change one or more
on-site encounters during the semester.
126
The Florence Experience III: Intermediate Italian I
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructors: Italian Faculty
Contact hrs/wk: 4 per week
Prerequisite: Two semesters of Italian
Site visit fee: $ 45
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES
The Florence Experience III is an interdisciplinary course which builds on two semesters of
previous work. It focuses on achieving an intermediate level in cultural and linguisticcommunicative competences regarding familiar matters, personal experiences and events, a
various range of conversational topics and situations likely to arise whilst traveling while
introducing students to various, relevant aspects of contemporary Florentine life and Italian
culture. The course offers students an interdisciplinary experience in language learning made
possible only by direct immersion in the target culture. Since language and culture are deeply
connected (language IS culture and culture IS language), each class will introduce students to
linguistic skills such as communicative structures, grammar structures, vocabulary and
pronunciation, but will, at the same time, provide them with a deeper knowledge of Italian
culture. The city of Florence becomes a cultural laboratory: with its world-famous fashion
concerns, its beautiful theaters and lively markets, its young writers and actors, and its
characteristic stores and artisans’ workshops, it is a composite of contemporary Italian culture
to be explored by the student. In addition to classroom work, the course includes a series of
on-site encounters, which will range from interviews with various exponents of Florentine
society, to encounters with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances;
field-trips and treasure hunts at the most vivacious markets in town, and encounters with
students of the University of Florence. Students will encounter the author Camilla Trinchieri,
who will conduct with them an interactive dialogue about translation of excerpts from her
recent book Cercando Alice. Students will translate selections from the novel during the first
part of the semester, and they will subsequently meet the author.
REQUIREMENTS
Textbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2. Italian Course for English Speakers.
Textbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2007
Workbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2. Workbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2007
Supplementary Text: selected exercises and readings excerpted from other language texts
and workbooks, activities, and handouts created by instructors.
Homework: Outside of class time, students are expected to review subsequently, and
complete all the exercises assigned by the instructor.
Class Participation: Extremely important due to the peculiar characteristics of a
LANGUAGE and CULTURE course where interaction and active participation are the basis
of all of the classes.
Write-ups: Students will have to write a series of one page write-ups about what they
experienced during the on-site encounters and on topics assigned by the instructor. Please
note that all write-ups are due on the due date.
Tests: There will be 4 one-hour exams designed to verify students’ ability to listen,
comprehend, and write in Italian. The second test is the Mid-term Exam, and the fourth test is
the Final Exam. (NO MAKE-UP TESTS)
Absences: A maximum of 2 class day absences will be accepted. Additional absences will be
excused only at display of a doctor’s note or they will bring the final grade down – a grade
per absence. Ex: 3 absences, A– becomes B+; 4 absences, B– becomes C.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Tests (1 and 3)
20%
127
Write-ups
15%
*Class Participation (incl. Homework)
20%
Mid-term Exam (Test 2)
20%
Final Exam (Test 4)
25%
*(Participation Breakdown: Attention in Class; Motivation; Class Interaction - with
Classmates and Teacher; Homework /Tutorial Attendance – if assigned;
Punctuality)*
A = 100 – 93
A– = 92 –90
B+ = 89 – 87
B = 86 – 83
B– = 82 –80
C+ = 79 - 77
C = 76 – 73
C– = 72 70
D+ = 69 – 67
D = 66 – 63
D– = 62 –60
F = 59 – 0
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE
 Prima settimana: 16-19 gennaio
Review: Unitá 1, Incontri
Communicative functions: Motivation to study Italian as a foreign language / Talking
about past events and experiences (I) / Describing past situations (I)
Grammar: Indicativo passato prossimo and imperfetto
Esercizi: dalla Unità 1
Progressive Test

Seconda settimana: 23-26 gennaio
Review: Unitá 1, Incontri / Unitá 2, Progetti futuri
Communicative functions: Talking about future plans / Making hypothesis
Grammar: Direct, indirect and reflexive pronouns / Future tense / Hypothetical
sentences with the future
Esercizi: dalle Unità 1 e 2

Terza settimana: 30 gennaio – 2 febbraio
Review: Supplementary text
Communicative functions: Making polite requests / Expressing wishes / Giving and
asking for advice
Grammar: Present conditional / Uses of the conditional
Esercizi: a cura dell’insegnante
First Encounter

Quarta settimana: 6-9 febbraio
Unitá 3, L'importante è mangiare bene; Unità 4, Mens sana
Communicative functions: Giving advice and commands in informal and formal
situations / Asking for advice
Grammar: Informal and formal imperative / The imperative in combination with
direct, indirect and reflexive pronouns
Esercizi: dalle Unità 3 e 4
TEST 1 (Giovedì 9 febbraio)

Quinta settimana: 13-16 febbraio
Unità 4, Mens sana
128
Communicative functions: Making comparisons / At the doctor's: talking about
diseases / The human body
Grammar: Comparative and superlative, regular and irregular / Combined pronouns
Esercizi: dalla Unità 4

Sesta settimana: 20-23 febbraio
Unità 5, Do you speak Italian?
Communicative functions: Talking about past events and experiences (II) /
Describing past situations (II) / Talking about studying abroad: comparing Europe
and the United States
Grammar: Indicativo trapassato prossimo
Second Encounter

Settima settimana: 27 febbraio – 1 marzo
Esami metà semestre (TEST 2: TBA)
Mid-term Break: 2-11 marzo

Ottava settimana: 12-15 marzo
Unitá 5, Do you speak Italian? / Unità 6, Vivere in città / Selected pages from Unitá 9,
Invito alla lettura
Communicative functions: Describing books, newspaper articles and stories /
Describing a city / Telling about life in a city
Grammar: Relative pronouns / Indicativo passato remoto (how to recognize it when
reading)
Esercizi: dalle Unità 5 e 6
Third Encounter

Nona settimana: 19-22 marzo
Unitá 7, Luoghi comuni
Communicative functions: Expressing personal opinions / Talking about stereotypes /
Comparing Italy and the United States
Grammar: Congiuntivo presente after verbs of opinion (credere che – pensare che –
sembrare che – parere che) and impersonal expressions (è importante che – è bene
che – è giusto che)
Esercizi: dalla Unitá 7
Fourth Encounter

Decima settimana: 26-29 marzo
Unitá 7, Luoghi comuni
Communicative functions: Expressing wishes, personal feelings, doubts and necessity
/ Talking about cultural differences between European countries and the United States
Grammar: Congiuntivo presente after verbs of doubt (dubitare che), necessity
(bisogna che – occorre/è necessario che) and verbs expressing personal feelings
(pleasure, fear, illusion... volere che – temere/avere paura che / essere felice che) /
Congiuntivo passato / Uses of congiuntivo and indicativo
Esercizi: dalla Unità 7
Fifth Encounter

Undicesima settimana: 2-5 aprile
Unitá 7, Luoghi comuni / Unità 8, Parole, parole, parole...
Communicative functions: Talking about personal opinions in the past / Talking about
the use of mass media in Italy
.
129
Grammar: Indefinite adjectives and pronouns (alcuni -nessuno – altri – qualcuno...) /
Uses of congiuntivo and indicativo / Congiuntivo imperfetto
Esercizi: dalle unità 7 e 8
Sixth Encounter
TEST 3 (Giovedì 5 aprile)


Dodicesima settimana: 10-12 aprile (9 aprile Lunedì dell’Angelo. L’Istituto è
chiuso)
Unitá 10, La famiglia cambia faccia
Communicative functions: Talking about family relationships / Comparing a typical
American and Italian family / Stereotypes on the Italian family: il mammone
Grammar: Adverbs ending with -mente / Review of adjectives and adverbs
Esercizi: dalla Unità 10
Seventh Encounter
Tredicesima settimana: 16-19 aprile
General Review

Quattordicesima settimana: 23-26 aprile
General review
Progressive Test

Quindicesima settimana: 30 aprile – 3 maggio
Final Examinations (TEST 4: TBA)
The progression of the on-site encounters will be decided by the instructor according to
public structures' opening hours and other practical matters. During the semester,
students will be involved in the following encounters:








At the market. Encounter with delicatessen sellers, butchers, fruit and fish vendors at the
vivacious Mercato Centrale who will tell students about their products.
The city's meeting point par excellence: the Florentine coffee houses or “bar”.
Encounter with Italian students of the University of Florence in class (two or more
encounters)
Studying in Florence. Encounter with students at the University of Florence (Department
of Literature and Philosophy) who will show the American students around the school
and will discuss the differences between university education in Italy and the United
States.
Italians' passion for food: dinner or lunch at a typical Florentine trattoria.
Encounter with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances (two
encounters)
Students will meet and interact with elderly Italians from two historical quarters of
Florence (San Frediano and Santo Spirito). These historic districts are rich in culture and
full of tradition, and the visitors will provide an insightful look into this world.
Camilla Trinchieri, author of Cercando Alice (Marcos y Marcos, Milano 2010) will
conduct a dialogue with the students about translation using excepts from her novel.
This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor might decide to add or change one or more
on-site encounters during the semester.
130
The Florence Experience IV: Intermediate Italian II
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructors: Italian Faculty
Contact hrs/wk: 4
Site visit fee: $ 45
Prerequisite: Three semesters of Italian
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES
The Florence Experience IV is an interdisciplinary course which builds on three semesters of
previous work. It focuses on achieving a post-intermediate level in cultural and linguisticcommunicative competences regarding a wide range of complex, longer oral and written
texts. The course aims at developing such competences in order to enable students to express
themselves without evident strain in a wide range of subjects and spontaneously participate in
interaction with native speakers, while introducing them to various, relevant aspects of
contemporary Florentine life and Italian culture. The course offers students an
interdisciplinary experience in language learning made possible only by direct immersion in
the target culture. Since language and culture are deeply connected (language IS culture and
culture IS language), each class will introduce students to linguistic skills such as
communicative structures, grammar structures, vocabulary and pronunciation, but will, at the
same time, provide them with a deeper knowledge of Italian culture. The city of Florence
becomes a cultural laboratory: with its world-famous fashion concerns, its beautiful theaters
and lively markets, its young writers, songwriters and actors, and its characteristic stores and
artisans’ workshops, it is a composite of contemporary Italian culture to be explored by the
student. In addition to classroom work, the course includes a series of on-site encounters,
which will range from interviews with various exponents of Florentine society, to encounters
with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances; field-trips and treasure
hunts at the most vivacious markets in town, and encounters with students of the University of
Florence. Students will encounter the author Camilla Trinchieri, who will conduct with them
an interactive dialogue about translation of excerpts from her recent book Cercando Alice.
Students will translate selections from the novel during the first part of the semester, and they
will subsequently meet the author.
REQUIREMENTS
Textbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2. Italian Course for English Speakers.
Textbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2007
Workbook: Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2. Workbook, Alma Edizioni – Firenze 2007
Supplementary Text: selected exercises and readings excerpted from other language texts
and workbooks, in addition to activities and handouts created by instructors.
Homework: Outside of class time, students are expected to review subsequently, and
complete all the exercises assigned by the instructor.
Class Participation: Extremely important due to the peculiar characteristics of a
LANGUAGE and CULTURE course where interaction and active participation are the basis
of all of the classes.
Write-ups: Students will have to write a series of one page write-ups about what they
experienced during the on-site encounters and on topics assigned by the instructor. Please
note that all write-ups are due on the due date.
Tests: There will be 2 one-hour exams designed to verify students’ ability to listen,
comprehend, and write in Italian. (NO MAKE-UP TESTS)
Oral Presentations: Students will have to hold two oral presentations on assigned topics
regarding contemporary Italian culture.
Mid-term Exam and Final Exam: There will be one written and oral Mid-term Exam, and
one written and oral Final Exam. (NO MAKE-UP TESTS)
131
Absences: A maximum of 2 absences will be accepted. Additional absences will require
medical justification or any other absence will bring the final grade down – a grade per
absence. Ex: 3 absences, A– becomes B+; 4 absences, B– becomes C.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Oral Presentations
10%
Write-ups
15%
Tests (1-3)
20%
*Class Participation
20%
Mid-term Exam / Test 2 (written 10%; oral 5%)
15%
Final Exam / Test 4 (written 15%; oral 5%)
20%
*(Participation Breakdown: Attention in Class; Motivation; Class Interaction - with
Classmates and Teacher; Homework /Tutorial Attendance – if assigned;
Punctuality)*
B+ = 89-87 C+ = 79-77
A = 100-93 B = 86-83 C = 76-73
A- = 92-90 B- = 82-80 C- = 72-70
D+ = 69-67
D = 66-63
D- = 62-60
F = 59-0
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE
 Prima settimana: 16-19 gennaio
Presentazione del corso. Presentazione dell'insegnante e dei partecipanti al corso. Analisi
dei bisogni e delle motivazioni degli studenti.
Ripasso: Unitá 1, Incontri
Funzioni comunicative: Raccontare fatti passati / Descrivere situazioni al passato in
italiano
Grammatica: Indicativo passato prossimo e imperfetto / Pronomi diretti, indiretti e
riflessivi
Esercizi: dalla Unità 1
Progressive Test

Seconda settimana: 23-26 gennaio
Ripasso: Unità 5, Do you speak Italian?
Funzioni comunicative: Raccontare esperienze passate / Chiedere e dare informazioni
Grammatica: Indicativo trapassato prossimo / Pronomi relativi
Esercizi: dall’Unità 5

Terza settimana: 30 gennaio – 2 febbraio
Ripasso: Unità 6, Vivere in città
Funzioni comunicative: Narrare al passato. Composizione scritta di storie al passato.
Grammatica: Passato remoto
Esercizi: dall’Unità 6
First Encounter

Quarta settimana: 6-9 febbraio
Unità 7, Luoghi comuni
Funzioni comunicative: Esprimere opinioni personali.
Grammatica: Congiuntivo presente e passato
132
Esercizi: dall’unità 7
TEST 1 (Giovedì 9 febbraio)

Quinta settimana: 13-16 febbraio
Unità 8, Parole, parole, parole…
Funzioni comunicative: Riferire opinioni personali passate. Discutere e argomentare.
Grammatica: Congiuntivo imperfetto e trapassato.
Esercizi: dall’unità 8
Second Encounter
Prima presentazione orale di gruppo

Sesta settimana: 20-23 febbraio
Ripasso generale del programma svolto nella prima parte del semestre
Esercizi: a cura dell'insegnante

Settima settimana: 27 febbraio – 1 marzo
Esami di metà semestre (TEST 2: TBA)
Mid-term Break: 2-11 marzo

Ottava settimana: 12-15 marzo
Unità 9: Invito alla lettura
Unità 10: La famiglia cambia faccia
Funzioni comunicative: Descrivere un libro / Esprimere giudizi / Discutere, argomentare
Grammatica: Congiuntivo in dipendenza dai connettivi prima che – a patto che /
Congiuntivo in dipendenza dalle congiunzioni.
Esercizi: Esercizi dalle unità 9 e 10.
Third Encounter

Nona settimana: 19-22 marzo
Unità 11: Tradizioni italiane
Funzioni communicative: Descrivere feste e tradizioni / Discutere e argomentare /
Esprimere desideri
Grammatica: Ripasso dei tempi del condizionale / Segnali discorsivi e connettivi
Esercizi: dall’unità 11
Fourth Encounter

Decima settimana: 26-29 marzo
Unità 12: Salviamo il nostro pianeta
Funzioni communicative: Fare ipotesi / Discutere e lamentarsi
Grammatica: Il Periodo ipotetico
Esercizi: dall’unità 12
Fourth Encounter

Undicesima settimana: 2-5 aprile
Unità 13: Noi e gli altri
Funzioni comunicative: Lamentarsi, protestare e giustificarsi / Esprimere desideri e
preferenze / Fare richieste in modo cortese.
Grammatica: Concordanza dei tempi del congiuntivo / Congiuntivo in dipendenza dal
condizionale
Esercizi: dall’unità 13
Fifth Encounter
TEST 3 (Giovedì 5 aprile)
133

Dodicesima settimana: 10-12 aprile (9 aprile Lunedì dell’Angelo. L’Istituto è
chiuso)
Unità 14: Italia da scoprire
Funzioni communicative: Raccontare un viaggio / Descrivere un luogo
Grammatica: Si impersonale
Esercizi: dall’unità 14
Sixth Encounter

Tredicesima settimana: 16-19 aprile
Ripasso generale.
Esercizi: a cura dell'insegnante

Quattordicesima settimana: 23-26 aprile
Ripasso generale
Esercizi: a cura dell'insegnante
Progressive Test

Quindicesima settimana: 30 aprile – 3 maggio
Esami finali (TEST 4: TBA)
The progression of the on-site encounters will be decided by the instructor according to
public structures' opening hours and other practical matters. During the semester,
students will be involved in the following encounters:
 At the market. Encounter with delicatessen sellers, butchers, fruit and fish vendors at the
vivacious Mercato Centrale who will tell students about their products.
 The city's meeting point par excellence: the Florentine coffee houses or “bar”.
 Encounter with Italian students of the University of Florence in class (two or more
encounters)
 Studying in Florence. Encounter with students at the University of Florence (Department
of Literature and Philosophy) who will show the American students around the school
and will discuss the differences between university education in Italy and the United
States.
 Camilla Trinchieri, author of Cercando Alice (Marcos y Marcos, Milano 2010) will
conduct a dialogue with the students about her book.
 Italians' passion for food: dinner or lunch at a typical Florentine trattoria
 Encounter with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances
 Students will meet and interact with elderly Italians from two historical quarters of
Florence (San Frediano and Santo Spirito). These historic districts are rich in culture and
full of tradition, and the visitors will provide an insightful look into this world.
This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor might decide to add or change one or more
on-site encounters during the semester.
134
The Florence Experience V: Advanced Italian
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructors: Italian Faculty
Contact hrs/wk: 4
Site visit fee: $ 45
Prerequisite: Four semesters of Italian
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES
The Florence Experience V is an interdisciplinary course which builds on four semesters of
previous work. It focuses on achieving an advanced level in cultural and linguisticcommunicative competences regarding a wide range of complex, longer oral and written
texts. The course aims at developing such competences in order to enable students to express
themselves fluently in a wide range of subjects and spontaneously participate in interaction
with native speakers, while introducing them to various, relevant aspects of contemporary
Florentine life and Italian culture. The course offers students an interdisciplinary experience
in language learning made possible only by direct immersion in the target culture. Since
language and culture are deeply connected (language IS culture and culture IS language), each
class will introduce students to linguistic skills such as communicative structures, grammar
structures, vocabulary and pronunciation, but will, at the same time, provide them with a
deeper knowledge of Italian culture. The city of Florence becomes a cultural laboratory: with
its world-famous fashion concerns, its beautiful theaters and lively markets, its young writers,
songwriters and actors, and its characteristic stores and artisans’ workshops, it is a composite
of contemporary Italian culture to be explored by the student. In addition to classroom work,
the course includes a series of on-site encounters, which will range from interviews with
various exponents of Florentine society, to encounters with young Florentine actors who will
offer interactive performances; field-trips and treasure hunts at the most vivacious markets in
town, and encounters with students of the University of Florence. Students will encounter the
author Camilla Trinchieri, who will conduct with them an interactive dialogue about her
recent book, Cercando Alice. Students will have to read the novel during the first part of the
semester, and they will successively meet the author.
REQUIREMENTS
Textbook: T. Marin, Nuovo progetto italiano 3 (Corso multimediale di lingua e civiltà
italiana. Livello Intermedio e Avanzato), Edilingua, Roma 2008.
Workbook: Bidetti-Dominici-Piccolo, Nuovo progetto italiano 3 (Corso multimediale di
lingua e civiltà italiana. Livello Intermedio e Avanzato), Edilingua, Roma 2008.
Supplementary Text: selected readings and class activities excerpted from contemporary
Italian literary texts and other language textbooks, in addition to activities and handouts
created by the instructor.
Readings: Camilla Trinchieri, Cercando Alice, (selection), Marcos y Marcos – Milano 2010.
Homework: Outside of class time, students are expected to review subsequently, and
complete all the exercises assigned by the instructor.
Class Participation: Extremely important due to the peculiar characteristics of a
LANGUAGE and CULTURE course where interaction and active participation are the basis
of all of the classes.
Write-ups: Students will have to write a series of one page write-ups about what they
experienced during the on-site encounters and on other topics assigned by the instructor.
Please note that all write-ups are due on the due date.
Oral Presentations: Students will have to hold two oral presentations on assigned topics
regarding contemporary Italian culture.
Tests: There will be 2 one-hour exams designed to verify students’ ability to listen,
comprehend, and write in Italian. (NO MAKE-UP TESTS)
135
Mid-term Exam and Final Exam: There will be one written and oral Mid-term Exam, and
one written and oral Final Exam.
Absences: A maximum of 2 absences will be accepted. Additional absences will require
medical justification or any other absence will bring the final grade down – a grade per
absence. Ex: 3 absences, A– becomes B+; 4 absences, B– becomes C.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Oral Presentations
10%
Write-ups
15%
Tests (1 e 3)
20%
*Class Participation and Homework
20%
Mid-term Exam/Test 2 (written 10%; oral 5%)
15%
Final Exam/Test 4 (written 15%; oral 5%)
20%
*(Participation Breakdown: Attention in Class; Motivation; Class Interaction - with
Classmates and Teacher; Homework /Tutorial Attendance – if assigned;
Punctuality)*
A = 100-93
A- = 92-90
B+ = 89-87
B = 86-83
B- = 82-80
C+ = 79-77
C = 76-73
C- = 72-70
D+ = 69-67
D = 66-63
D- = 62-60
F = 59-0
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
SCHEDULE
 Prima settimana: 16-19 gennaio
Presentazione e descrizione del corso. Presentazione dell’insegnante e dei partecipanti al
corso. Analisi dei bisogni e delle motivazioni degli studenti.
Unità 10: Novecento
Ripasso: i tempi passati dell’indicativo (passato prossimo – imperfetto – trapassato prossimo).
Raccontare e argomentare al passato.
Progressive Test
Esercizi: dall’Unità 10 e a cura dell’insegnante.
 Seconda settimana: 23-26 gennaio
Unità 11: Telefonini
La concordanza dei tempi dell’indicativo.
Lettura e analisi di un testo letterario: D. Maraini, da Bagheria
Esercizi: dall’unità 11 e a cura dell’insegnante.
 Terza settimana: 30 gennaio – 2 febbraio
Unità 8: Figli… a vita Unità 15: Come è ingiusta la parità
Condizionale semplice e composto. Esprimere dubbi, fare richieste educate, esprimere
desideri e rammarico.
Esercizi: dalle unità 8 e 15, e a cura dell’insegnante.
First Encounter
 Quarta settimana: 6-9 febbraio
Unità 7 Uomini e donne / 18 Computer / 26 Medicina alternativa
Il sistema pronominale italiano (pronomi diretti – indiretti – doppi – riflessivi). La posizione
dei pronomi con i tempi e i modi verbali in italiano.
136
Lettura e analisi di un testo letterario: N. Ginzburg, “una lettera” da Caro Michele).
Esercizi: dalle unità e a cura dell’insegnante.
TEST 1 (Giovedì 9 febbraio)
 Quinta settimana: 13-16 febbraio
Unità 15: Come è ingiusta la parità.
Il congiuntivo (congiuntivo presente e passato). Discutere e argomentare. Esprimere dubbi ed
opinioni personali.
Esercizi: dalla unità 15 e a cura dell’insegnante.
Second Encounter
 Sesta settimana: 20-23 febbraio
Ripasso generale del programma svolto nella prima parte del semestre.
Esercizi: a cura dell’insegnante.
Presentazioni orali
 Settima settimana: 27 febbraio – 1 marzo
Eami di metà semestre (TEST 2: TBA)
Mid-term Break: 2-11 marzo
 Ottava settimana: 12-15 marzo
Unità 16: Storia della pasta.
Il passato remoto: narrare al passato. Composizione scritta di storie al passato. / La
formazione degli aggettivi (cenni).
Esercizi: dall’unità 16 e a cura dell’insegnante.
Third Encounter
 Nona settimana: 19-22 marzo
Camilla Trinchieri, autrice di Cercando Alice (Marcos y Marcos, Milano 2010) condurrà in
classe un dialogo interattivo con gli studenti sul suo ultimo romanzo. Attività di lettura,
comprensione, traduzione e scrittura creativa.
Esercizi: A cura dell’insegnante e dell’autrice.
Fourth Encounter
 Decima settimana: 26-29 marzo
Unità 9: Lavoro / Unità 25: Pasticceria Grazia
I pronomi relativi / La forma passiva
Presentazioni orali
Esercizi: dalle unità e a cura dell’insegnante.
Fifth Encounter
 Undicesima settimana: 2-5 aprile
Unità 20: Stop alle auto.
Il periodo ipotetico (congiuntivo imperfetto e trapassato. Ancora sul condizionale). Formulare
ipotesi reali, possibili e irreali.
Esercizi: dall’unità 20 e a cura dell’insegnante.
Sixth Encounter
TEST 3 (Giovedì 5 aprile)
 Dodicesima settimana: 10-12 aprile (9 aprile: Lunedì dell’Angelo. L’Istituto è chiuso)
Unità 21: Il falso a tavola / Unità 29: Roma antica
Le forme implicite: gerundio – participio – infinito (cenni)
137
Lettura e analisi di un testo letterario: I. Calvino, “Le città e il cielo. 4”, “Le città e gli
occhi. 2”, ”Le città e gli scambi. 3”, da Le città invisibili.
Presentazioni orali
Esercizi: dalle unità e a cura dell’insegnante.
Seventh Encounter
 Tredicesima settimana: 16-19 aprile
Ripasso generale del programma svolto durante la seconda parte del semestre.
Esercizi: A cura dell’insegnante.
 Quattordicesima settimana: 23-26 aprile
Ripasso generale
Esercizi: A cura dell’insegnante.
Exit Test
 Quindicesima settimana: 30 aprile – 3 maggio
Esami finali (TEST 4: TBA)
The progression of the on-site encounters will be decided by the instructor according to
public structures' opening hours and other practical matters. During the semester,
students will be involved in the following encounters:










At the market. Encounter with delicatessen sellers, butchers, fruit and fish vendors at
the vivacious Mercato Centrale who will tell students about their products.
Students will interview three persons belonging to various social and cultural contexts
in the commercial district of Florence.
The city's meeting point par excellence: the Florentine coffee houses or “bar”.
Encounter with Italian students of the University of Florence in class (two or more
encounters)
Studying in Florence. Encounter with students at the University of Florence
(Department of Literature and Philosophy) who will show the American students
around the school and will discuss the differences between university education in
Italy and the United States.
Treasure hunt in the commercial district of the city of Florence.
Italians' passion for food: dinner or lunch at a typical Florentine trattoria.
Encounter with young Florentine actors who will offer interactive performances (two
encounters).
Students will meet and interact with elderly Italians from two historical quarters of
Florence (San Frediano and Santo Spirito). These historic districts are rich in culture
and full of tradition, and the visitors will provide an insightful look into this world.
Camilla Trinchieri, author of Cercando Alice (Marcos y Marcos, Milano 2010) will
conduct a dialogue with the students about her book.
This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor might decide to add or change one or more
on-site encounters during the semester.
138
Readings in Modern Italian Literature: A Journey
into the Italian Theatre (in Italian)
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Italian Faculty
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Site visit fee: $ 45
Prerequisite: Proficiency in Italian
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Il corso, interamente impartito in italiano, è dedicato agli studenti a un livello avanzato di
conoscenza della lingua italiana. Il filo conduttore del corso è il teatro. Di lezione in lezione
gli studenti si confronteranno con alcuni dei testi più significativi della drammaturgia italiana,
ma l’analisi dei testi sarà inserita all’interno dei contesti nei quali furono prodotti. Il corso non
si limita pertanto alla lettura delle opere, ma fornisce agli studenti le linee guida per la
comprensione di alcuni dei principali fenomeni dello spettacolo italiano.
Nella prima parte del semestre verranno individuati gli aspetti salienti del teatro medievale e
rinascimentale a partire dai cambiamenti nella drammaturgia e dalle trasformazioni degli
spazi scenici. Una lente di ingrandimento sarà posta sulle iniziative spettacolari promosse a
Firenze dai Medici quali forme di autopromozione e auto contemplazione. Un
approfondimento verrà poi dedicato alla Commedia dell’Arte, tra storia e mito. Attraverso la
lettura di commedie distese e di scenari verrà indagato il metodo compositivo
dell’Improvvisa. La riforma proposta da Carlo Goldoni sarà contestualizzata nella scia della
progressiva “deriva” della Commedia dell’Arte. Concluso il fenomeno storico, nel Novecento
il mito della Commedia dell’Arte è recuperato da Giorgio Strehler (come regista) e Dario Fo
(come attore e drammaturgo).
Il corso prevede anche una sezione dedicata anche al teatro di Luigi Pirandello e a quello di
Eduardo De Filippo. Tramite la visione di spettacoli dal vivo in cartellone nei teatri fiorentini
si favorirà l’interesse degli studenti verso la tradizione operistica italiana e le forme dello
spettacolo contemporaneo.
Requirements: attendance, class participation, in class discussions, assignments, in class
presentations, mid-term exam, final exam.
Mid-Term: written (essay-questions) on the program covered during the first half of the
semester.
Final Exam: written (essay-questions, cumulative) on the program covered during the entire
semester.
Attendance and Participation: attendance is mandatory. If a student misses one or more
classes, it is in her/his care to catch up with what she/he missed (notes, readings, assignments,
etc.). Every student should be aware that she/he is responsible for the whole material covered
by the course. Every absence will lower the Participation grade. If a student misses 20% of
the schedule class hours during this course (i.e. at the 3rd absence) the Final Grade will be
lowered of one full letter grade.
Criteria for Evaluation
Mid-Term Exam
Final Exam
Final Paper (five pages)
30 %
30 %
20 %
139
Class Participation
A = 100 - 93
A- = 92 - 90
B+ = 89 - 87
B = 86 - 83
B- = 82 - 80
20 %
C+ = 79 - 77
C = 76 - 73
C˗ = 72 - 70
D+ = 69 - 67
D = 66 - 63
D˗ = 62 - 60
F = 59 - 0
Text books, further readings, movies, field trips:
Most of the readings will be photocopied material supplied by the teacher. These will be taken
from the books listed in the bibliography below. The program listed in the syllabus may vary
depending on the students’ proficiency.
Field Trips (date da concordare con gli studenti):
1. Dal Cortile di Palazzo Medici Riccardi a Palazzo Pitti: luoghi di spettacolo nella Firenze
medicea.
2. Firenze, Teatro della Pergola.
3. Fondazione Cerratelli, San Giuliano Terme (Lucca) e Lucca.
Shows
1. Uno o più spettacoli d’opera (da concordare con gli allievi non appena i teatri
pubblicheranno i cartelloni).
2. Uno o più spettacoli di prosa (da concordare con gli allievi non appena i teatri
pubblicheranno i cartelloni).
Workshop
Le maschere e i “lazzi” della Commedia dell’Arte. Prove di “lettura” di alcuni scenari della
Commedia dell’Arte.
Videos
Movies:
1. La carrozza d’oro, regia di Jean Renoir, 1952.
2. Il Viaggio di Capitan Fracassa, regia di Ettore Scola, 1990.
Riprese di spettacoli:
1. Arlecchino servitore di due padroni, regia di Giorgio Strehler.
2. Mistero buffo, di e con Dario Fo.
Texts
- P. Aretino, La Cortigiana, (qualsiasi edizione).
- L. Ariosto, La Cassaria (qualsiasi edizione).
- N. Machiavelli, La Mandragola, (qualsiasi edizione).
- C. Goldoni, Il teatro comico, (qualsiasi edizione).
- F. Scala, Il teatro delle favole rappresentative, a cura di F. Marotti, Milano, Il Polifilo, 1974, 2 voll.
- Dario Fo, Non tutti i ladri vengono per nuocere,in Id., Le commedie di Dario Fo, a cura di Franca
Rame, Torino, Einaudi, 1984, pp. 87-119.
- S. Ferrone, Commedie dell’Arte, Milano, Mursia, 1986, 2 voll.
- L. Pirandello, Questa sera si recita a soggetto, a cura di Roberto Alonge, Milano, Mondadori, 1997.
- C. Molinari, La Commedia dell’Arte, Roma, Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato, 1999.
- C. Goldoni, Gli innamorati, a cura di S. Ferrone, Venezia, Marsilio, 2002.
- D. Fo, Mistero buffo, Torino, Einaudi, 2005.
- C. Goldoni, La locandiera, a cura di S. Mamone e T. Megale, Venezia, Marsilio, 2007.
- I canovacci della commedia dell’Arte, a cura di A. M. Testaverde, trascr. e note di A. Evangelista,
Torino, Einaudi, 2007.
Bibliography
- S. Mamone, Il teatro nella Firenze medicea, Milano, Mursia, 1981.
- S. Ferrone, Attori, mercanti, corsari, Torino, Einaudi, 1993.
140
- O. Guaita, I teatri storici in Italia, introd. S. Mazzoni, Milano, Electa, 1994.
- D. J. Grout, Breve storia dell’opera, Milano, Rusconi, 1995.
- R. Tessari, Teatro italiano del Novecento. Fenomenologie e strutture 1906-1976, Le Lettere, Firenze,
1996.
- The Oxford Illustrated History of Theatre, edited by J. R. Brown, Oxford, Oxford University Press,
1995.
- P. Degl’Innocenti, Architetture per lo spettacolo, Firenze, Libreria Alfani, 2001.
- Teatro e spettacolo nella Firenze dei Medici. Modelli di luoghi teatrali, catalogo della mostra a cura
di E. Garbero Zorzi e M. Sperenzi, Firenze, Olschki, 2001.
- A History of Italian theatre, a cura di J. Farrell e P. Puppa, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press,
2006.
- C. Molinari, Storia del teatro, Roma, GLF Laterza, 2007.
COURSE SCHEDULE
Prima settimana: 16-19 gennaio
 Introduzione al corso. Spiegazione del syllabus.
 Introduzione alla Letteratura teatrale italiana e alla Storia del teatro italiano.
 La spettacolarità diffusa del Medioevo.
Materiali iconografici relativi alle trasformazioni dell’edificio teatrale.
Readings:
- C. Molinari, Storia del teatro, Roma, GLF Laterza, 2007, pp. 54-61; 68-76.
- P. Degl’Innocenti, Architetture per lo spettacolo, Firenze, Libreria Alfani, 2001, pp. 53-57.
- A History of Italian theatre, a cura di Joseph Farrell e Paolo Puppa, Cambridge, Cambridge
University Press, 2006, pp. 9-28.
Seconda settimana: 23-26 gennaio
 La Firenze medicea, paradigma dei cambiamenti nello spettacolo tra Medioevo e
Rinascimento: dagli spettacoli religiosi alla nascita dell’opera.

Field trip: luoghi di spettacolo nella Firenze medicea (cortile di Palazzo Medici
Riccardi, Salone dei Cinquecento, localizzazione Teatro degli Uffizi, localizzazione
del Teatro di Baldracca, cortile e sala Bianca di Palazzo Pitti).
Materiali iconografici relativi alla storia del teatro fiorentino.
Readings:
- S. Mamone, Il teatro nella Firenze medicea, Milano, Mursia, 1981, pp. 17-25, 31-45, 59-63,
68-79.
- D. J. Grout, Breve storia dell’opera, Milano, Rusconi, 1995, p. 61, 98-99.
- O. Guaita, I teatri storici in Italia, introd. S. Mazzoni, Milano, Electa, 1994, pp. 24, 47-49,
84-87.
- P. Degl’Innocenti, Architetture per lo spettacolo, Firenze, Libreria Alfani, 2001, pp. 78-79.
- Teatro e spettacolo nella Firenze dei Medici. Modelli di luoghi teatrali, catalogo della
mostra a cura di E. Garbero Zorzi e M. Sperenzi, Firenze, Olschki, 2001.
Terza settimana: 30 gennaio – 2 febbraio
 La drammaturgia: dalle origini alla codificazione della commedia cinquecentesca.
Readings:
- P. Aretino, La Cortigiana, (qualsiasi edizione).
- L. Ariosto, La Cassaria (qualsiasi edizione).
- N. Machiavelli, La Mandragola, (qualsiasi edizione).
- A History of Italian theatre, a cura di Joseph Farrell e Paolo Puppa, Cambridge, Cambridge
University Press, 2006, pp. 29-83.
Quarta settimana: 6-9 febbraio
 La Commedia dell’Arte: la nascita del moderno professionismo teatrale.
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 Il mito dell’improvvisazione.
Materiali iconografici relativi alla Commedia dell’Arte.
Readings:
- F. Scala, Il teatro delle favole rappresentative, a cura di F. Marotti, Milano, Il Polifilo, 1974,
2 voll.
- S. Ferrone, Commedie dell’Arte, Milano, Mursia, 1986, 2 voll.
- I canovacci della commedia dell’Arte, a cura di A. M. Testaverde, trascr. e note di A.
Evangelista, Torino, Einaudi, 2007.
- C. Molinari, Storia del teatro, Roma, GLF Laterza, 2007, pp. 103-112.
Quinta settimana: 13-16 febbraio
 Workshop: Le maschere e i “lazzi” della Commedia dell’Arte. Prove di “lettura” di
alcuni scenari della Commedia dell’Arte.
Sesta settimana: 20-23 febbraio
 Revisione del programma svolto. Esercitazioni scritte e orali in vista dell’esame.
Settima settimana: 27 febbraio – 1 marzo
 Esami di metà semestre.
Mid-term Break: 2-11 marzo
Ottava settimana: 12-15 marzo
 Il teatro di Carlo Goldoni.
 Lo slittamento dei ruoli: Gli innamorati e La locandiera.
Readings:
- C. Goldoni, Gli innamorati, a cura di S. Ferrone, Venezia, Marsilio, 2002.
- C. Goldoni, La locandiera, a cura di S. Mamone e T. Megale, Venezia, Marsilio, 2007.
- P. Vescovo, Carlo Goldoni, playwright and reformer, in A History of Italian theatre, a cura
di Joseph Farrell e Paolo Puppa, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp. 160-176.
Nona settimana: 19-22 marzo
 Il Teatro comico di Carlo Goldoni.
Readings:
- Carlo Goldoni, Il teatro comico (qualsiasi edizione).
Decima settimana: 26-29 marzo
 Introduzione al teatro del primo Novecento italiano: Luigi Pirandello.
Readings:
- R. Tessari, Teatro italiano del Novecento. Fenomenologie e strutture 1906-1976, Le Lettere,
Firenze, 1996.
- L. Pirandello, Questa sera si recita a soggetto, a cura di Roberto Alonge, Milano,
Mondadori, 1997.
Undicesima settimana: 2-5 aprile
 Il mito della commedia dell’Arte nel Novecento: Giorgio Strehler.
 Il mito della commedia dell’Arte al cinema.
Brani dal video: Arlecchino servitore di due padroni, regia di Giorgio Strehler (ed. televisiva
1993)
Film: La carrozza d’oro, regia di Jean Renoir, 1952; Il Viaggio di Capitan Fracassa, regia di
Ettore Scola, 1990.
Dodicesima settimana: 10-12 aprile
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(9 aprile Lunedì dell’Angelo: l’Istituto è chiuso)
 Il teatro di Dario Fo.
 Il mito della Commedia dell’Arte nel Novecento: Dario Fo.
Brani dal video: Mistero buffo, di e con Dario Fo.
Readings:
- Dario Fo, Non tutti i ladri vengono per nuocere, in Id., Le commedie di Dario Fo, a cura di
Franca Rame, Torino, Einaudi, 1984, pp. 87-119.
- Dario Fo, Mistero buffo, Torino, Einaudi, 2005.
Tredicesima settimana: 16-19 aprile
 Il teatro di Eduardo De Filippo: Questi fantasmi e Filumena Marturano.
Readings:
- Eduardo De Filippo, Questi fantasmi, in Teatro. Cantata dei giorni dispari (vol. II, t. I), a
cura di Paola Quarenghi e Nicola De Blasi, Mondadori, Milano, 2005, pp. 317-484.
Id., Filumena Marturano, ivi, pp. 487-646.
Quattordicesima settimana: 23-26 aprile
 Seminario: “leggere” uno spettacolo.
Quindicesima settimana: 30 aprile – 3 maggio


Final Examinations: esame scritto su tutto il programma.
Colloquio orale sui testi letti.
This syllabus is subject to change.
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Shifting Identities:
Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Stefano U. Baldassarri, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Prerequisite: None
(Taught in English)
COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIES
Ever since Jacob Burckhardt’s seminal studies about 150 years ago, the idea of
individualism and, consequently, self-fashioning has been considered crucial to an
understanding of the Renaissance. As the Swiss scholar wrote in his famous
Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860), “In the Middle Ages, man was
conscious of himself only as a member of a race, people, party, family or corporation
— only through some general category. In Italy this veil was first melted into air; an
objective treatment and consideration of the state and of all things of this world
became possible. The subjective side at the same time asserted itself with
corresponding emphasis; man became a spiritual individual and recognized himself as
such.” In recent years such views have been increasingly challenged by a host of
scholars approaching the Renaissance from a number of different perspectives:
economics, gender studies, political theory, reception theory, and art history — just to
name a few. Yet, as William Connell puts it in a recent volume of collected essays
devoted to this topic, “To say that the ‘modern individual’ was discovered during a
given period and in a given place sounds like a very strong claim, but perhaps it is
worth remembering that the idea did find some support in quite specific Renaissance
changes in the way individuals were described and portrayed, and that most of them
either involved Florentines or took place in Florence.”
In light of this engaging scholarly debate and against a rich interdisciplinary
background (involving all the humanities, from literature to music, art, theology and
philosophy), the course will draw on a wide variety of primary sources to investigate
the changes that have affected a number of socio-political figures (such as poets,
statesmen, merchants, artists, scientists, and the clergy) in late Medieval and early
Renaissance Florence. Emphasis will also be put on the shifting role of women (both
in regard to their status and education) as well as on the attitude towards minorities —
mostly Jews, unorthodox Christians and foreign residents — within the Florentine
milieu from the outbreak of humanism (ca. 1350) to the making of the Medici Grand
Duchy (1569).
The course will be taught in English. Likewise, all sources will be read in English.
However, handouts of some texts in the original language will also be provided, as
attention will be paid to their rhetorical and stylistic peculiarities during class
discussion. Attention will also be paid to the growing importance of art and
architecture as means of political propaganda in Renaissance Florence; to this
purpose, the class will visit some relevant late medieval and Renaissance sites in
Florence on meeting 17 and the Palazzo Medici Riccardi on meeting 24.
Requirements and grading: Grading is based on contribution to class discussion
(10% of final grade); a 5-page midterm paper (20%); a midterm exam (20%); a final
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exam (25%) and final paper (25%). Final papers (due by the last day of class and
previously discussed with the teacher) will have to be 8-10 pages long, double-spaced,
with footnotes and an up-to-date bibliography (for a first reference, see the essays and
the volumes put on reserve by the teacher. See also the ‘secondary bibliography’
section listed on the syllabus after each meeting).
Attendance and office hours: As attendance is mandatory, students are invited to
talk to the teacher in advance if there is any valid reason for them to miss a
forthcoming meeting. After a second unexcused absence, the letter grade will be
diminished by one third (e.g.: from B+ to B). The same policy will apply after three
tardies. Office hours are by appointment and after the end of each meeting.
W Credit: UConn students who take this course to fulfill a W requirement also
need to submit a first, preliminary outline of their project as well as drafts of both the
midterm and final papers. Students will incorporate the first revisions into the second
draft, which will be reviewed again before being given approval for the final draft.
Since improving writing skills is a crucial goal in this class, the teacher will follow
and supervise the students’ writing process throughout the semester by providing
substantial formative commentary on each main feature of their papers (style, format,
content, structure, language, punctuation, conceptual clarity and consistency,
footnotes, bibliography). UConn students must have a portfolio of all tests, drafts
and the feedback they receive from the teacher. All these materials must be kept by
the students and brought back to their home campus to present to the CLAS Academic
Services Center or their School. The writing assignment will be a combination of
research and literary critical writing. Final papers will have to be 15 pages long,
double-spaced and provided with up-to-date bibliography (a select bibliography will
be reported at the end of the paper on a separate sheet). Remember to ask for the
“UConn W Credit Form” which must be signed as soon as possible by both the
student and the teacher. Please note that W Credit students who fail to meet the
writing requirements will not pass the course.
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are
expected to develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the
school occupies and they are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
Required textbooks:
-) Course reader prepared by the teacher. The anthology includes excerpts from the
following sources: Petrarch (Letter to Posterity and The Ascent of Mount Ventoux),
Boccaccio (Famous Women), Salutati (In Defence of Lucrece), Machiavelli (The
Prince), and Vasari (Lives of Famous Artists).
-) S.U. Baldassarri and A. Saiber (eds. and trans.), Images of Quattrocento Florence.
Selected Writings in Literature, History, and Art (New Haven-London: Yale
University Press, 2000).
-) G. Boccaccio, The Decameron, trans. G.H. McWilliam (London: Penguin Books,
1995).
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Course calendar:
The course will consist of 27 meetings, corresponding to 14 weeks of classes,
scheduled as follows:
1. (1/17)
Introduction to the course. Epochs, social contexts, and literary
genres.
2. (1/19)
Women: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, author’s prologue and
introduction.
Secondary bibliography: See McWilliam’s introduction to his own
translation, cit., Part One, pp. xxxi-lv.
3. (1/24)
Women: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, introduction to Day IV; Day IV
Story 1 and Day VI Story 3.
Secondary bibliography: See McWilliam’s introduction to his own
translation, cit., Part Two, pp. lv-lxxix.
4. (1/26)
Women: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, Day VI Story 7; Day VII
Stories 2 and 4.
Secondary bibliography: K. Pennington’s article A Note to
‘Decameron’ 6.7.
5. (1/31)
Women: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, Day VII Story 6; Day X Story
10.
Secondary bibliography: See essay by Wallace on ‘controlling
domestic space’.
6. (2/2)
Women: Read Boccaccio, Famous Women (reader).
Secondary bibliography: See Brown’s introduction to her edition of
Boccaccio’s Famous Women and King’s essay on Renaissance women.
7. (2/7)
Women: Read Salutati, In Defence of Lucrece (reader).
Secondary bibliography: See Jed’ introduction to her translation of
Salutati, In Defence of Lucrece (reader).
8. (2/9)
Merchants: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, Day I Stories 1-2.
Secondary bibliography: See essay by Wallace on the power of
language.
9. (2/14)
Merchants: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, Day II Story 5 and Day IV
Story 5.
Secondary bibliography: See essay by Wallace on ‘Fortune, female
character and the impulse to trade’.
10. (2/16)
Merchants: Read Images, docc. 9, 10, 13, 15.
Secondary bibliography: See Tenenti’s essay The Merchant and the
Banker.
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11. (2/21)
Poets and scholars: Read Petrarch, Letter to Posterity and The Ascent
of Mount Ventoux (reader). Read Boccaccio, author’s epilogue to the
Decameron.
Secondary bibliography: See Musa’s introduction to his Selections
from the Canzoniere and Other Works.
12. (2/23)
Poets and scholars: Read Images, docc. 21-26.
Secondary bibliography: See Garin’s essay Dante in the Renaissance
and Baldassarri’s introduction to Manetti, Biographical Writings. See
also Baldassarri’s lecture The Implications of the Classical Revival.
13. (2/28)
Midterm exam (turn in midterm papers).
14. (3/13)
Artists and scientists: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, Day VI Story 5;
Day VIII Story 3; Day IX Story 3.
Secondary bibliography: See Falaschi’s essay on ‘Giotto’s legend’.
15. (3/15)
Artists and scientists: Read Images, docc. 17, 27-30.
Secondary bibliography: See Chastel’s essay on Renaissance artists.
16. (3/20)
Artists and scientists: Read Images, docc. 31-34 and Vasari (reader:
concentrate on Preface and lives of Cimabue, Giotto, and Masaccio).
Secondary bibliography: See Hope-McGrath, Artists and Humanists.
17. (3/22)
Tour of medieval and Renaissance Florence.
18. (3/27)
The clergy: Read Boccaccio, Decameron, Day I Story 3; Day II Story
1; Day III Story 1 and Day VI Story 10.
Secondary bibliography: See Wallace’s essay on Decameron, Day
III.
19. (3/29)
The clergy: Read Images, docc. 16, 35-40 and 45.
Secondary bibliography: See Hamilton’s essay Humanists and the
Bible.
20. (4/3)
The clergy: Read Images, docc. 41-44.
Secondary bibliography: See Weinstein’s essay on Savonarola.
21. (4/5)
Politics: Read Images, docc. 1-6.
Secondary bibliography: See Hankins’ essay Humanism and the
Origins of Modern Political Thought and Baldassarri’s articles A Tale
of Two Cities and Like Fathers like Sons.
22. (4/10)
Politics: Read Images, docc. 7-8, 11-12.
Secondary bibliography: See Burckhardt’s chapters The State as a
Work of Art and The Development of the Individual.
23. (4/12)
Politics: Read Images, docc. 18-20.
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Secondary bibliography: See Molho’s article Cosimo de’ Medici:
Pater Patriae or Padrino?.
24. (4/17)
Visit to Palazzo Medici Riccardi (The Magi Chapel) and San Lorenzo’s
Basilica.
25. (4/19)
Politics: Read Machiavelli, The Prince, Preface, chs. 1-3, 6-7 (reader).
Secondary bibliography: See Law’s essay The Renaissance Prince
and Mazzotta’s article on Machiavelli’s rhetoric in The Prince.
26. (4/24)
Politics: Read Machiavelli, The Prince, chs. 15-18, 22, 25-26 (reader)
Secondary bibliography:See essay by Colish on Machiavelli’s reading
of Cicero.
27. (4/26)
Review session. (Final papers due).
5/2
FINAL EXAM.
Please note: This syllabus is subject to change at any time according to circumstances.
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Cross-Cultural Psychology
Syllabus
Spring Semester 2012
Instructor: Christian Tarchi, Ph.D.
Credits: 3
Contact hrs/wk: 3
Site visit fee: $ 45
Prerequisite: None
COURSE RATIONALE, DESCRIPTION AND GOALS
Within America, Italy, and indeed across the world, cultural diversity, cross-cultural
communication, cross-cultural understanding and harmonious intercultural relations are
becoming increasingly important. The ease of international travel, access to the world wide
web, the globalization of business, immigration, as well as the maintenance of ethnic and
culture(s)-of-origin identity of those living in America, Italy and many other countries all
mean that contact between members of various cultures is inevitable in the rich tapestry of
cultures that we live amongst in our world today. It is therefore vital that we develop effective
skills to become global citizens of the world, to understand culture, cultural differences, and
the ways that culture influences the thinking and social behavior of people. The course will
expose you to the psychology of people in other cultures (with a particular focus on those in
Italy), and you shall develop the skills that it takes to become a global citizen and to be
successful in multicultural environments as well a deep appreciation of cultural similarities
and differences. It will assist you to challenge your own experiences and (possibly Western)
ideas about what it is to be a person. It will also encourage you to think critically about
universal principles in psychology. You will learn about cross-cultural psychology theoretical
models and practical ways of applying these in your life so you can develop intercultural
skills as a ‘global citizen’ that will assist you to understand cross-cultural interactions better,
be more effective in them, and get the most out of them.
COURSE FORMAT
Our course will take the form of dynamic, highly interactive site visits in Florence, interactive
workshops with Italian guest speakers and class seminars of 1.5 hours duration. Cross-cultural
theoretical frameworks will be explored using experientially-based activities (e.g. community
and site-oriented visits, a tour of Florentine sociocultural values, role-plays, skits, crosscultural business simulations, interviews of Italians, small and large group discussions, the
sharing of your cross-cultural experiences) that make the most of your cross-cultural
experience here in Florence, using Italy and its culture as a kind of ‘experimental classroom’
to facilitate intercultural awareness and hone your psychological skills for success as a global
citizen. You will have the opportunity to reflect deeply on your growth through journaling
and other means as you experience the Italian culture and become more aware of changes,
both positive and negative, as they occur within you. Active participation is expected from
each student during each seminar. Your reflections, critical thinking, ideas, questions and
contributions are highly encouraged - indeed expected - so please come to class alert, ready to
do some serious thinking, and prepared (with readings done and homework completed).
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING
You will receive a detailed outline of each of the graded assessment tasks, including what is
expected in order to achieve an exceptional grade for each task that contributes to your final
grade.
Your final grade will be made up of the following:
 20% Attendance at & level of participation in class seminars. Two inexcusable
absences will immediately bring your participation grade to at least a B. More than 2
will further reduce your participation grade. Absence due to sickness MUST be
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


accompanied by a doctor’s certificate to be counted as an ‘excusable absence’.
Inexcusable absence from field excursions or group presentations (including those of
others) will severely affect the participation grade.
30% Projects: individual project, group project, journal club, activities
20% Mid-Term Exam
30% Final exam
READER
You will be provided with the main course readings in a course reader. In addition, during the
course you will be provided with focus-papers.
ATTENDANCE
Class session attendance is compulsory. Students must speak to/email me in advance if
they have a valid reason for missing a forthcoming class.
OFFICE HOURS
I am available to respond to student questions after class and am also available for
appointments with students immediately after class. To be fair to all students, I ask that you
make these appointments with me in advance. I can also be contacted by email
([email protected]).
CLASSROOM POLICY
All students are expected to follow the uniform policy of the Institute. They are expected to
develop the appropriate respect for the historical premises which the school occupies and they
are not permitted to eat, drink or chew gum in class.
COURSE OUTLINE & ASSESSMENT TASK DUE DATES
Reading(s) for each session must be read (& reflected upon!) before each class.
1. Monday, Jan 16: Course introduction and explanation of assessment tasks.
Students will be introduced to the course and grading system will be explained.
Introduction to teaching approach. Students are to share their expectations and
personal interests.
What is culture? What is my cultural self. Describing ourselves through culture-based
classifications.
2. Wednesday, Jan 18: ‘Lived-in’ Florence – an exploratory tour of Florentine
sociocultural values.
An examination of the concept of culturally-specific social values. What images,
stereotypes, and narratives about Italy and Italians influence our initial perceptions of
Italian and Florentine cultural values?
3. Monday, Jan 23: Gaining a global perspective.
The “world village project”: viewing the population of the world from a more global
perspective. Exploring the territory. Italy, Tuscany, Florence, Centre: getting to know
where we are.
4. Wednesday, Jan 25: Psychological skills for success in multicultural
environments.
Meeting another culture. Identifying the ways in which typical ways of acting and
thinking are the same as (or different from) the ways of thinking and acting by people
who live in a different geographic area or grew up in a different time.
Defining calendar for Journal Club.
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5. Monday, Jan 30: Reading: “Culture and Human Nature” (pp. 1-22).
Discussion of the Reading. How can we connect theoretical concepts to our daily
practices.
6. Wednesday, Feb 1: Intra-cultural variation as an inevitable part of cultural
variation.
Regional cultural variations within Italy and within America. North-South, inter- and
intra-regional comparisons. Attitudes, beliefs, norms, and values shared by people
who speak a particular dialect, within a particular geographic region, during a specific
historical time frame (Northern and Southern Italian and Northern and Southern
American regional focus).
7. Monday, Feb 6: Reading: “Theories and Methodologies” (pp. 23-45).
Discussion of the Reading. What is each theory’s contribution to our understanding of
cultures and how can theories be useful to guide our inquiry?
8. Wednesday, Feb 8: Cross-Cultural Human Development: infancy.
What differences do exists across cultures in child caring and rearing practices? How
do these differences relate to cross-cultural differences?
9. Monday, Feb 13: Cross-Cultural Human Development: education. Reading:
“Cross-cultural Research Methods” (pp. 46-69).
Discussion of the Reading. What kind of processes, skills, and competencies do
different school system foster? Results from the PISA assessment and comparisons
USA-Italy.
10. Wednesday, Feb 15: Cultural Metaphors. Analyzing cultures through metaphors.
Resolving intercultural incidents.
11. Monday, Feb 20: Reading: “Cultural Shock due to contact with unfamiliar
cultures” (pp. 70-77).
Culture shock curves and theories about the sequence of the culture shock experience.
Students to reflect on their present sojourn in Italy. How can one manage culture
shock? In what ways may culture provide implicit guidelines for cultural transitions?
12. Wednesday, Feb 22: MID-TERM EXAM REVIEW & PRACTICE EXAM
February 27-March 1: Mid-term Examinations
March 2-11: Midterm Break
13. Monday, Mar 12: Workshop of Group Cross-Cultural Exploration
presentations.
Time in class to form groups, prepare and workshop ideas with me. Decide group &
topic by today.
14. Wednesday, Mar 14: Why is that funny? The Cultural context of humor &
entertainment.
What American humor tickles your funnybone? What is entertaining in the US?
Why? Is this humor universally funny? You are to share examples of humor that
appeal to you and together we’ll analyse why and what this humor tells us about
American culture. Analysis of examples of humor from Italy and other cultures
(cartoons, essays, jokes, stories, songs). Examination of Italian humor. What does this
humor tell us about the culture which produced it? What can we learn from culture by
understanding humor?
151
15. Monday, Mar 19: Reading: “Cultural Evolution” (pp. 78-108). Discussion of the
reading. Can we see changes across time in our culture?
16. Wednesday, Mar 21: Cultural ‘Craziness': the biology and culture of mental
illness.
Universalism vs. Relativism. To what extent are mental illnesses universal (culturally
neutral) vs. culturally specific?
17. Monday, Mar 26: Reading: “Dimensionalizing cultures: the Hofstede Model in
Context” (pp. 109-126). The Hofstede Model. The Hofstede model of 5 dimensions
of national cultures as a paradigm for comparing the Italian and American cultures.
Hofstede’s dimension of culture scales by country. Discussion of the reading.
18. Wednesday, Mar 28: The inter-relationship between communication and
culture.
The relationships between culture, communication, cultural literacy, and cultural
competence. The communication process by which individuals are culturally
programmed to effectively perform in a given culture.
Friday, Mar 30: Section 1: Visit to the Ex-Asylum at San Salvi
19. Monday, Apr 02: Workshop of group presentations.
How to perform an effective presentation.
20. Wednesday, Apr 04: Reading: “Subjective Culture” (pp. 127-134). Discussion of
the Reading. Triandis’ Cultural syndromes for the systematic probing of the construct
of culture.
21. Wednesday, Apr 11: Viewing of a quintessential Italian film for analysis from a
cultural perspective
Friday, Apr 13: Section 2: Visit to the Ex-Asylum at San Salvi
22. Monday, Apr 16: Reading: “Becoming Interculturally competent” (pp. 135-147).
Discussion of the reading. Ethnorelativism and intercultural sensitivity. The various
ways of being human: Idiosyncratic, ETIC, and culture-specific or EMIC behaviors.
23. Wednesday, Apr 18: Group presentations.
24. Monday, Apr 23: Taking stock of our experience.
Reflect on what you’ve gained and learnt from your cross-cultural experiences over
the semester PLUS write a separate Student Profile potentially for the institute’s
website including ‘Currently what I am doing here’, ‘Most Memorable Experience at
Palazzo Rucellai’, ‘Advice for Future Students’ (see Prospective Students page on
website).
April 30 – May 3
Final examinations
152
CURRICULA VITAE
153
CARLO ACHILLI
CURRICULUM VITAE Borgo dei Greci 20, 50122 Firenze, Italy
mobile +39 340 335 9839
[email protected]
EDUCATION
2001
Master II lvl in Pianificazione, Conservazione e Gestione dei Centri Storici Minori e
dei Sistemi Paesistico - Ambientali, University of Rome
2000
1999
One year Scholarship in the Master of Science in Architecture Studies | MIT |
Architecture & Urbanism - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
1998
Licensed Architect, Italy | Ordine degli Architetti di Terni n° 287
1996
Laurea in Architettura - Professional Degree in Architecture - University of Rome,
Italy
Facoltà di Architettura - School of Architecture and Planning – grade 110/110
LANGUAGES: Italian & English
SKILLS: Photography, Graphic Design, computer literate in both PC and Mac: Autodesk
Architectural Studio, Revit, AutoCAD, 3D Studio Max, Flash, Adobe CS5, Macromedia
Dreamweaver, HTML language, Terrain Modelling, Concant LT, Mosaico, Microsoft Office.
TEACHING EXPERIENCE
2012
2002
DIRECTOR
■ Director of Architectural Program in Florence for Roger Williams University,
School of Architecture and Art and Historic Preservation | Study Abroad
ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM COORDINATOR
■ Coordinator of Architecture Program for the Institute at Palazzo Rucellai
International Studies Institute, Florence, Italy
PROFESSOR
■ ARCH 416 Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
for Roger Williams University
■ IARCH 310A Interior Architecture Studio V
for Marywood University
■ HP 391 Architecture in Italy: Historic Preservation
for the Institute at Palazzo Rucellai
2011
TUTORIAL | FORUMS | SYMPOSIUM
154
2000
■ ITALY University of Florence: Green Value the Economic Benefits of Sustainable
Design
■ ITALY Centro Studi Alta Formazione di Orvieto: Recovery Master Plan for the
Historic Center
■ ITALY University of Rome “La Sapienza” - The Fortress of Cardinale Albornoz
nel XIVth Cen.
■ ITALY University of Florence: The Sustainable City
■ AFRICA, Ghana Accra City Hall: The Government House, The Restoration of
Fortress in Accra
■ USA NJ Paterson City Hall: Urban Renewal for Paterson City
■ USA MA Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge: Urban Renewal for
Paterson City
2000
TEACHING ASSISTANT | MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
■ Dimension of the Space - Prof. Edward Levine - MIT Visual Arts Program
Supervised students, conducted classes and tutorial assistance for project
documentation through a series of diverse approaches including graphic design and
modelling
INVITED PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
2011
THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
School of Architecture
■ Member of Thesis Jury in field of Urban Design Studio led by Professors Justyna
Karakiewicz and Lindsay Holland
2011
THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
School of Architecture
■ Guest Lecture: Italian Historic Preservation | Restoration and reuse of the historic
buildings with sustainable investigative techniques
2006
ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY
School of Architecture and Art and Historic Preservation
■ Visiting during the NAAB _ National Architectural Accrediting Board
as Director of Architectural Program in Florence
INTERNSHIPS
PROJECT ASSISTANT IN URBAN DESIGN | BRA Boston Redevelopment
2000
Authority
1998
City Hall, Boston, USA
■ Projects for SOUTH BOSTON WATERFRONT: hotels, cultural, restaurant,
retail, recreational attractions, and other uses
PROJECT ASSISTANT IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
Free Lance Civil Engineering office, Studio Paolo Benucci, Orvieto, Italy
■ Projects of rehabilitation, consolidation & reuse of the historical buildings and
construction site experiences
155
FREE LANCE ARCHITECT COMPLETED PROJECTS
1998 - 2011
CULTURAL CENTER
■ Architectural Manager for the PALAZZO CARAVAJAL SIMONCELLI, XVI Century Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings & Construction: the Design proposal included
architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation & reuse of the bldg for a new Cultural Center
in Orvieto, including a grand Ballroom.
http://www.residenzadinamica.it
HOTELS
■ Architectural Manager for the HOTEL PALAZZO PICCOLOMINI, XVI Century,
Orvieto, Umbria: Architectural Project for the rehabilitation, consolidation & reuse of the
building Palazzo Piccolomini, converted into four stars hotel and Interior Design Project
including suites, superior double bedrooms, American bar and restaurant.
Published on Architectural Digest N.313 June 2007
http://www.hotelpiccolomini.it
■ Restyling of the HOTEL LA BADIA, VI Century, Orvieto, Umbria: Architectural Project
for the rehabilitation, & consolidation of the building La Badia, four stars hotel. Interior
Design Project including new guest rooms, suites, restaurant, fitness & wellness center.
http://www.labadiahotel.it
HOLIDAY HOUSES
■ Architectural manager for the CASE VACANZA Montemoro - Farmhouse & pool in
Umbria. Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings & Construction: the Design proposal
included architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation & reuse for holiday house while
respecting of traditional Italian farmhouse typology.
http://www.montemoro.com
■ Architectural Manager for the AGRITURISMO Pian del Bello including five holiday
houses & pool in Umbria. The Design proposal focused on the new buildings while respecting
of traditional Italian farmhouse typology.
http://www.piandelbello.net
■ Architectural Manager for the Restoration of several COUNTRY HOUSES and GUEST
HOUSES in Tuscany & Umbria. The Design proposal focused on the reuse and rehabilitation
of damaged & unused farm houses converted into Villas or Agriturismi or Holiday
Farmhouses with pool, starting from landscape design to interiors.
RESIDENTIAL
■ Restoration Project for a residential building, PALAZZO BARBERINO-TAFANI, XVI
Century, Santa Croce Area, Florence, Tuscany. Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings
& Construction: the Design proposal included architectural survey, restoration & reuse for a
luxurious residential apartment.
■ Architectural Manager for the Restoration Project, BLDG ALESSANDRA FIUMI, XI
Century, Orvieto, San Giovenale, Umbria. Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings &
Construction: the Design proposal included architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation &
reuse for residence.
■ Architectural Manager for the Restoration Project, BLDG PERCLE TILLI, XII Century,
Orvieto, San Giovenale, Umbria. Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings &
156
Construction: the Design proposal included architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation &
reuse for residence.
■ Architectural Manager for the Project Restyling of residences, BLDG VIA DEL
CROCIFISSO, Florence, Tuscany. Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings &
Construction: the Design proposal included architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation &
reuse for residences.
■ Architectural Manager for the Project Restyling of residences, BLDG VIA DEL
PORCELLANA, Florence, Tuscany. Responsible for Design, Executive Drawings &
Construction: the Design proposal included architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation &
reuse for residences
OFFICES
■ Architectural Manager for the PALAZZO RANIERI, XIV Century, Orvieto, Umbria
Responsible for Design & construction site for Palazzo Ranieri with annexed Medieval
Tower: rehabilitation, reuse & interior design project for insurance headquarter, offices and
commercial
■ Architectural Manager for the PALAZZO CHIGI, XIII Century, Viterbo, Italy
Responsible for Design & Construction site for Palazzo Chigi: the project included
architectural survey, restoration, rehabilitation & reuse for retails, offices & residences
■ Architectural Manager for the PALAZZO VIA I. GARBINI, Contemporary Bldg,
Viterbo, Italy
Responsible for Design: the project of offices & retails
MASTER PLAN
■ Advisor for the FANELLO Master Plan: new district in the suburban area of the Orvieto.
The Zoning include residential, commercial, and office bldgs such us green areas and
facilities.
■ Recovery Urban Plan FEUDI DELLA MEDUSA, Santa Margherita di Pula, Cagliari,
Sardegna.
Responsible for Design & Executive Drawings. The project included Master Plan for holiday
houses, restaurants, stores, swimming-pools, cellars & facilities
■ Recovery Urban Plan for rehabilitation of an HISTORIC DISTRICT in Orvieto, Umbria.
The Design proposal focused on the rehabilitation of an old damaged district through
upgrading of traditional building technology respecting the historic urban typologies
PROFESSIONAL TRAINING COURSE
2005
■ CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY | DOMOTICS INNOVATION
TECHNOLOGY |
Computing Systems for Household Energy Conservation | Ordine degli
Architetti, Florence
157
1998
■ CERTIFICATE OF COORDINATOR OF SECURITY SYSTEM ON
CONSTRUCTION SITE |
RESPONSIBLE IN THE DESIGN & IN THE WORKS | D.Lgs. 494/96 D.Lgs.
626/94 |
(COORDINATORE DELLA SICUREZZA IN FASE DI PROGETTAZIONE
E IN FASE DI ESECUZIONE DEI LAVORI,
D.Lgs. 494/96 D.Lgs. 626/94)
University of Rome, Facoltà di Architettura, Italy - School of Architecture and
Planning
WORKSHOP EDUCATIONAL COORDINATOR/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
2011
2009
■ III° SUSTAINABLE DESIGN LE MURATE WORKSHOP 26- 31 May 2011,
Executive Director: Arch. Paolo Di Nardo, Management Committee: AND +
Progetto Sapere
■ Ist ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO WORKSHOP with cultural cooperation
agreement between
The University of Florence (UNI_FI), School of Architecture and the Institute at
Palazzo
Rucellai, Architecture Program (PRARP) 21-29 March 2011
Executive Director: Arch. Carlo Achilli, Management Committee: AND + Arch.
Paolo Di Nardo
■ II° SUSTAINABLE DESIGN BEHNISCH ARCHITEKTEN WORKSHOP
FIRENZE 2-6 November 2010
Executive Director: Arch. Paolo Di Nardo, Management Committee: AND +
Progetto Sapere
■ I° SUSTAINABLE DESIGN MARIO CUCINELLA WORKSHOP FIRENZE
24-28 March 2009
Executive Director: Arch. Paolo Di Nardo, Management Committee: AND +
Progetto Sapere
ARCHITECTURAL/URBAN PLANNING PUBLIC EXHIBITION|EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
2010
2008
■ VI° THE SHAPING OF URBAN SPACE: Sant’Ambrogio, Le Murate_Florence,
December 2010
■ V° THE SHAPING OF URBAN SPACE: Piazza Ghiberti_ Florence, May 2010
■ IV° THE SHAPING OF URBAN SPACE: SAN FREDIANO_ Florence,
December 2009
■ III° THE SHAPING OF URBAN SPACE: Piazza di Cestello_ Florence, May
2009
■ II° THE SHAPING OF URBAN SPACE: Piazza dei Ciompi, SANTA CROCE_
Florence, December 2008
158
EMANUELA AGOSTINI
PERSONAL DETAILS
Place and date of birth: Florence, 29th December 1980
Address: Via G. Montanelli, 16/B – 50065 Pontassieve (Fi)
Tel: 055 83 67 241 – Mobile: 349 78 93 685
E-mail: [email protected]
HIGHER EDUCATION
 Ph.D. in History of Performing Arts, Doctorate School of Performing Arts History,
University of Florence. Thesis supervised by Prof. Anna Maria Testaverde and Prof. Siro
Ferrone: Il Bergamasco in commedia. La tradizione dello zanni nel teatro d’antico
regime.
 Graduated in Theatre History on 26th April 2005 at the University of Florence, Facoltà di
Lettere e Filosofia. Title of the dissertation: Virginia Reiter, attrice comica e drammatica
tra Otto e Novecento (Virginia Reiter, a Comedy and Dramatic Actress between the 19th
and the 20th Centuries), supervised by Prof. Siro Ferrone. Final grade: 110 (out of 110).
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
 2010-present: Temporary Research Associate, University of Florence, Department of
History of Visual and Performing Arts, as editor and author of actors’ biographical
profiles for the A.M.At.I (Italian Actors Multimedia Archive) directed by Siro Ferrone.
 2009-present: Professor at the Institute at Palazzo Rucellai.
 January 2006 – 2009: writer and editor for the online magazine www.drammaturgia.it,
supervised by Siro Ferrone.
 2002 – 2006: theatre course teacher at nursery schools, primary and secondary schools,
and colleges in Florence and Bagno a Ripoli – working also in courses aimed at disabled
people (for Archètipo; Pictor s.n.c.; Associazione Sipario).
 2006: Holding updating courses for teachers of the Alessandro Volta Institute: The Actor:
the Voice and the Body.
 May 2005 – present: editor and author of actors’ biographical profiles for the A.M.At.I
(Italian Actors Multimedia Archive) directed by Siro Ferrone.
 2001 - 2005, theatre teacher at the Archètipo Teatro Theatre School, Teatro Comunale of
Antella.
 2001 – 2005, Associazione Archètipo, theatre events co-ordinator for Bagno a Ripoli
municipal schools.
 2002 - 2005, leading actress in the following theatrical productions: Macbeth, Notturni e
altre poesie by Dino Campana and Il giro del cielo by Daniel Pennac, directed by
Riccardo Massai (Archetipo 2004-2005); Cristo Gitano, written by Antonio Tabucchi and
directed by Daniele Lamuraglia (Pupi e Fresedde – Teatro di Rifredi 2002-2003); Il
Diritto del sogno and Sigismondo e il suo diritto, directed by Daniele Lamuraglia,
choreography by Angela Torriani Evangelisti (Versiliadanza 2002-2004).
 2002 - 2003, Director’s Assistant for the following theatrical productions: The Tempest by
W. Shakespeare, directed by Riccardo Massai, musically supervised by Johanna Knauf,
choreography by Maria Grazia Nicosia (Archetipo 2003); SMS-Shakespeare Messages
System by Daniele Lamuraglia (Pupi e Fresedde 2002).
PUBLICATIONS
 Il Bergamasco in commedia. La tradizione dello zanni nel teatro d’antico regime (in
press).
 Actors’ biographical profiles for the A.M.At.I (Italian Actors Multimedia Archive)
directed by Siro Ferrone (http://amati.fupress.net/Main.uri): Virginia Reiter (30/05/2005),
Adelaide Tessero (30/09/2006), Fanny Sadowsky (01/01/2006), Teresa Mariani
159


(20/03/2007), Dina Galli (16/03/2009), Bartolomeo Bolla (06/02/2009), Luigi Carini
(12/03/2009), Nera Grossi Carini (14/03/2009), Edoardo Ferravilla (15/04/2009), Davide
Carnaghi (20/04/2009), Cele Abba (02/05/2009), Paolo Bonecchi (20/05/2009), Franca
Valeri (20/05/2009), Vasco Brambilla (29/05/2009), Alessio Boni (17/11/2009), Laura
Vestri Marsoni (07/03/2010), Elvira Righettini (24/03/2010), Ugo Pagliai (22/07/2010),
Rodolfo Baldini (08/09/2010), Piero Baldini (05/09/2010), Vivaldo Matteoni
(13/09/2010), Alfio Caltabiano (14/09/2010), Enio Drovandi (14/09/2010), Dante
Biagioni (20/09/2010), Alfredo Dessì (21/09/2010), Claudio Bigagli (22/09/2010), Pier
Luigi Zollo (25/10/2010), Fetonte Cancellieri (26/10/2010), Felice Cancellieri
(30/09/2010), Carlo Lodovici (01/11/2010), Moreno Fabbri (17/11/2010), Vittorio
Gassman (15/09/2011), Carmelo Bene (11/11/2011).
La carriera e il repertorio di Virginia Reiter, in Arte Musica Spettacolo. Annali del
Dipartimento di Storia delle arti e dello spettacolo. Ann. VI-VII 2005-2006, Firenze,
Cadmo, 2007, pp. 45-70.
Performance and book reviews on www.drammaturgia.it
CONFERENCES
 15th December 2011, introducing the project Memoria del teatro italiano. Attori e attrici
(1861-2011), promoted by University of Florence, Teatro della Pergola (Firenze), Il
Teatro Italiano nel Mondo di Maurizio Scaparro.
 2nd June 2011, workshop Archivio Multimediale degli Attori Italiani, promoted by the
Doctorate School of Visual and Performing Arts History.
 28th May 2011, presenting a speech at the meeting Frotule e strambotti alla bergamasca
udur d’amur e de polenta, promoted by Provincia di Bergamo. Assessorato alla Cultura,
Spettacolo, Identità e Tradizioni.
 15th January 2010, Il Bergamasco in commedia. La tradizione dello zanni nel teatro
d’antico regime, meeting promoted by Associazione Culturale La Leggera, Centro di
Ricerca e Documentazione sulla cultura orale, Comune di Rufina. Assessorato alla
Cultura e alle Tradizioni Popolari.
 16th December 2008 speech at the meeting Il teatro e la città: lasciti e prospettive di
relazioni promoted by Comune di Bergamo, University of Bergamo, Teatro Donizetti.
 22nd September 2007, introducing the publication Virginia Reiter. Attrice comica e
drammatica tra Otto e Novecento (Virginia Reiter. A Comedy and Dramatic Actress
between the 19th and the 20th Centuries). (Virginia Reiter Festival – The Job of Actress;
Teatro Fondazione Collegio San Carlo, Modena).
 18th June 2005, speech at the meeting Ricordo di Virginia Reiter (Memory of Virginia
Reiter) promoted by the Association “Virginia Reiter”, at “La Meridiana” centre,
Casinalbo (Mo).
OTHER SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS
 2006 - 2008 supporting teaching activities aimed at students of Dams (University for Arts
and Music) and Pro.Ge.A.S. of Florence as part of the Doctorate School programme.
 2001 - Diploma at the Theatre School of Laboratorio Nove (Teatro della Limonaia –
Sesto Fiorentino), led by Barbara Nativi, taking part in the performance Frammenti
Koltès.
I authorise the processing of personal data as stated by the Italian law (Dl.196/2003).
160
Stefano U. Baldassarri, Ph.D.
Via Foscolo 25, 50124
Florence, Italy.
Tel./fax: (+39) 055-2207362
E-mail: [email protected]
Born in Genoa (Italy), 22 August 1968.
Education
04\11
UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI DI FIRENZE, FLORENCE, ITALY
Ph.D. in Medieval and Renaissance Philology.
05\99
YALE UNIVERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CT, U.S.A.
Ph.D. in Italian Literature.
05\94
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, WASHINGTON D.C., U.S.A
M.A. degree in Medieval Studies.
04\93
UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI DI FIRENZE, FLORENCE, ITALY
M.A. degree in Italian literature.
Fellowships and Awards
01\10
Society for Renaissance Studies grant towards the organization of May 2011
conference in Florence titled Humanism and Universities in Tuscany (14001600).
11\07
Lila Wallace - Reader’s Digest Publication Subsidy (Villa I Tatti - Harvard
University).
06-00\06-01
Villa I Tatti Fellowship (Harvard University) for Renaissance studies.
11\98
Marion C. Sheridan Fellowship at Yale University for Ph.D. thesis
(Mythography and Rhetoric in Quattrocento Florence).
09\98
Borsa di Studio per ricerche in filologia e letteratura latina medievale
awarded by the Fondazione Ezio Franceschini (Florence, Italy).
02\98
The Renaissance Society of America Research Grant for Younger Scholars.
11\97
John Perry Miller Research Fund at Yale University.
03\97
John F. Enders Collaborative Research Grant at Yale University.
05\96
Richard Franke Fellowship at Yale University.
03\95
Yale University Fellowship.
05\94
Scholarship awarded by the Fondazione Ezio Franceschini (Florence, Italy)
for the best 1992 ‘Tesi di Laurea’ (M.A. thesis) in medieval studies in Italy.
01\94
Scholarship awarded by the University of Rome Tor Vergata to attend
graduate courses in a foreign university.
161
Employments and Teaching Experience:
6-07\present
Special Academic Activities Coordinator at ‘The International Studies
Institute at Palazzo Rucellai’ (Florence).
09-03\present
Professor of Italian Literature at ‘The International Studies Institute at
Palazzo Rucellai’ (Florence).
09-01\present
Professor of Italian Literature, Latin, History, and Geography at ‘Convitto
Nazionale’ (Arezzo: 09-01\08-09) and ‘Istituto Machiavelli’ (Florence: 0910\present).
11-02\11-04
Research Associate in Comparative Literature at Università di Cassino.
08-98\12-03
Professor of Italian Literature at Georgetown University (Florence Program).
11-02\02-03
Professor of Italian Literature at California State University (Florence
Program).
09-99\06-01
Professor of Italian Literature and Humanities at Pepperdine University
(Florence Program).
01-98\06-03
Tutor of Italian literature at Stanford University in Florence.
09-97\12-97
Teaching Assistant of Italian at Yale University.
Invited lectures given at:
University of Oxford, Yale University, Università di Firenze, Universitat de Barcelona,
Università di Pisa, Syracuse University Florence Program, The International Studies Institute
at Palazzo Rucellai, Università di Trento, Monash University Prato Program, Università di
Cassino, Georgetown University at Villa Le Balze, Sarah Lawrence Florence Program,
Associazione Culturale “Antonio Rosmini” di Trento, Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul
Rinascimento.
Major lectures, conferences, and workshops organized at The International Studies
Institute at Palazzo Rucellai as Special Academic Activities Coordinator, from June
2007 to present:
Workshops
1-30 June 2011 Translating the Past. A workshop on Medieval and Renaissance Sources
devoted to art, History, and Literature. One-month workshop, for a total of 96 hours of
classes, to train graduate students in philology, paleography, codicology, and translation
practice from Latin and ancient Italian into English. Students have been introduced to reading,
describing, classifying and translating medieval and Renaissance documents from Florentine
libraries and archives. The program has been organized by The International Studies Institute
at Palazzo Rucellai and sponsored by the following institutions: Society for Renaissance
Studies (U.K.), Harvard University at Villa I Tatti, Johns Hopkins University, Istituto Storico
Italiano per il Medio Evo, and Istituto Universitario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte.
1-30 June 2010 Translating the Past. A workshop on Medieval and Renaissance Sources
devoted to art, History, and Literature. One-month workshop, for a total of 96 hours of
classes, to train graduate students in philology, paleography, codicology, and translation
practice from Latin and ancient Italian into English. Students have been introduced to reading,
162
describing, classifying and translating medieval and Renaissance documents from Florentine
libraries and archives. The program has been organized by The International Studies Institute
at Palazzo Rucellai and sponsored by the following institutions: Society for Renaissance
Studies (U.K.), Johns Hopkins University, Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, and
Istituto Universitario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte.
Conferences
27-28 May 2011
Umanesimo e università in Toscana (1400-1600). Convegno
internazionale di studi, in collaboration with Georgetown University
at Villa Le Balze and Accademia ‘La Colombaria’ (see attached list
of publications for forthcoming conference proceedings).
21-22 October 2008
‘Proxima Studia’: Arte e letteratura a Firenze (1300-1600).
Convegno internazionale di studi. Conference proceedings
published in special issue of «Letteratura & Arte» (see attached list
of publications).
18-20 June 2007
Dignitas et excellentia hominis. Convegno internazionale di studi
su Giannozzo Manetti, in collaboration with Georgetown
University at Villa Le Balze and Kent State University Florence
Program. Conference proceedings published in 2008
(Florence, Le Lettere: see attached list of publications).
Lectures
24 June 2011
Christopher S. Celenza (Director of The American Academy in
Rome), End Game: Humanist Latin in the Fifteenth Century (as
Part of the 2011 Translating the Past workshop).
17 June 2011
Nicoletta Baldini (Università Bocconi, Milan), Researching in
Italian Archives: Vocabulary, Methodology, and Tips (as part of the
2011 Translating the Past workshop).
10 June 2011
Massimo Miglio (President of Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio
Evo), Committenza, autobiografia, autografia nel Rinascimento (as
part of the 2011 Translating the Past workshop).
3 June 2011
Edward Goldberg (Founder of ‘The Medici Archive Project’),
Reading Documents: Transcription, Translation and Context (as part
of the 2011 Translating the Past workshop).
20 April 2011
Marino Biondi (Università di Firenze), Una secolare costruzione di
identità: lingua e letteratura nel processo unitario.
23 March 2011
John Paoletti (Wesleyan University), Learn My Language: Strategies
of Medici Patronage in Fifteenth-century Florence.
25 June 2010
John Law (Chair of The Society for Renaissance Studies): The
Despots of Renaissance Italy: Researching the ‘Signori’ (as part of
the 2010 Translating the Past workshop).
18 June 2010
Massimo Miglio (President of Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio
Evo), Il libro umanistico, manoscritto e a stampa (as part of the
2010 Translating the Past workshop).
163
15 June 2010
James Hankins (Harvard University), A short history of philology
and some reflections on method (as part of the 2010 Translating the
Past workshop).
11 June 2010
Francesca Fumi (Università di Siena), Heraldry and Emblems:
An Introduction to the Symbols of Power in the Florentine
Renaissance (as part of the 2010 Translating the Past workshop).
4 June 2010
Gert Jan van der Sman (Istituto Universitario Olandese di Storia
dell’Arte), Memoirs, Account Books, Inventories, Artists’
Contracts: Archival Documents and the Study of Fifteenth-century
Florentine Art (as part of the 2010 Translating the Past workshop).
4 February 2010
Giovanna Lazzi (Director of Biblioteca Riccardiana di Firenze) and
Rosanna Miriello (Università di Udine), Il nuovo per l’antico:
manoscritti, miniature, legature in movimento sul web.
3 November 2009
Deborah Parker (University of Virginia), The World of Dante:
Teaching the Divine Comedy with Digital Resources.
16 March 2009 Arielle Saiber (Harvard University at Villa I Tatti), Leon Battista
Alberti and Renaissance Mathematics.
19 November 2008
Book presentations
21 October 2011
Marina Riccucci and Paolo Pontari (Università di Pisa), Un
riscoperto arazzo mediceo: Committenza artistica e letteratura
umanistica.
Bernardo Rucellai, De bello italico/La guerra in Italia, ed. and
trans. Daniela Coppini (Florence: Firenze University Press, 2011).
14 October 2011
Communes and Despots in Medieval and Renaissance Italy, eds.
John E. Law and Bernadette Paton (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010).
10 November 2010
Camilla Trinchieri, Cercando Alice, trans. Erika Bianchi (Milan:
Marcos y Marcos, 2010).
28 October 2010
Gert Jan van der Sman, Lorenzo e Giovanna. Vita e arte nella
Firenze del Quattrocento (Florence: Madragora, 2010).
22 June 2010
Pietro Verri, Storia di Milano, ed. Renato Pasta (Rome: Edizioni di
Storia e Letteratura, 2010).
26 April 2008
Marcello Simonetta, L’enigma Montefeltro (Milan: Rizzoli, 2008).
Forthcoming activities
8 March 2012: Presentation by CNR (Centro Nazionale Ricerche) researchers of Pynakes
Text, an innovative software to prepare critical editions and manage complex book
illustrations.
11 April 2012: Lecture by Prof. Valentina Lepri (Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul
Rinascimento), Best sellers (dimenticati e non) del Cinquecento: Machiavelli, Giovan Battista
Pigna e la Bibbia nell’editoria del Rinascimento on the printing press industry in sixteenthcentury Italy.
164
16 May 2012: Lecture by Prof. Nicoletta Baldini (Università Bocconi, Milan) on researching
archival documents pertaining to art history.
21-22 November 2012: Conference on Florentine explorer Amerigo Vespucci and relations
between Italy and the U.S. throughout history. The event will be co-sponsored by the
Università di Firenze, Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, and the American consulate in Florence.
May-September 2013: Exhibition (manuscripts, printed books, archival documents, and works
of art) on main Florentine families from the Middle Ages to the XX century. In collaboration
with the Archivio di Stato di Firenze and the Sovrintendenza ai Beni Archivistici.
PUBLICATIONS
Books:
La vipera e il giglio. Lo scontro tra Milano e Firenze nelle invettive di Antonio Loschi e
Coluccio Salutati (Rome: Aracne Editrice, 2012). Pp. 402. A monograph on the war between
Milan and Florence (1390-1402), including the critical edition and Italian translation of Latin
texts of propaganda by Milanese secretary Antonio Loschi and Florentine chancellor Coluccio
Salutati.
Giannozzo Manetti, Historia Pistoriensis (Florence: SISMEL, 2011). Pp. XIII + 385. Critical
edition of the history of the Tuscan city of Pistoia from its foundation in 62 B.C. to 1446 by
Florentine humanist Giannozzo Manetti (1396-1459). In collaboration with Benedetta Aldi
and William J. Connell.
‘Manettiana’. La biografia anonima in terzine e altri documenti inediti su Giannozzo Manetti
(Rome: Roma nel Rinascimento, 2010). Pp. X + 177. An anthology of hitherto unpublished
archival documents on Florentine humanist Giannozzo Manetti. In collaboration with Bruno
Figliuolo.
Giannozzo Manetti, Storia di Pistoia (Alessandria: Edizioni dell’Orso, 2010). Pp. 160.
Translation from Latin into Italian (provided with an introduction and explanatory notes) of
this innovative piece of humanist historiography.
Umanesimo e traduzione da Petrarca a Manetti (Cassino: Dipartimento di Linguistica e
Letterature Comparate dell’Università di Cassino, 2003). Pp. XV + 292. Monograph on
translation theories in the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance (Italy, France, and
England).
Giannozzo Manetti, Biographical Writings (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, I
Tatti Renaissance Library Series, 2003). Pp. XIX + 330. Critical edition and translation of
humanist texts from Latin into English. In collaboration with Rolf Bagemihl.
Giannozzo Manetti, Vite di Dante, Petrarca e Boccaccio (Palermo: Sellerio, 2003). Pp. 223.
Critical edition and translation of humanist biographies from Latin into Italian.
Erasmus of Rotterdam, Sileni Alcibiadis (Naples: Liguori, 2002). Foreword and notes by
Jean-Claude Margolin. Pp. 132. Translation from Latin into Italian of one of Erasmus’ most
famous Adagia.
Images of Quattrocento Florence: Selected Writings in Literature, History, and Art. Foreword
by Giuseppe Mazzotta. (New Haven-London: Yale University Press, 2000). Pp. LXIV + 350.
Anthology of fifteenth-century Florentine texts translated from Latin and Italian into English
in collaboration with Arielle Saiber.
165
Leonardo Bruni, Laudatio Florentinae Urbis (Florence: SISMEL, 2000). Pp. 148. Critical
edition with introduction and explanatory notes.
Michel de Montaigne, Essais III.8 (De l’art de conférer). Preface by Marc Fumaroli. Pp. 95.
Translation from French into Italian with explanatory notes.
Leonardo Bruni, Dialogi ad Petrum Paulum Histrum (Florence: Olschki, 1994). Pp. XXII +
304. Critical edition with introduction and explanatory notes.
Editing of conference proceedings:
“Proxima Studia”. Arte e letteratura a Firenze (1300-1600). Convegno internazionale di
studi (Palazzo Rucellai, 21-22 ottobre 2008), special issue of Letteratura & Arte, 9 (2011).
Dignitas et excellentia hominis. Atti del Convegno Internazionale di Studi su Giannozzo
Manetti (Fiesole–Firenze, 18-20 giugno 2008) (Florence: Le Lettere, 2008).
Articles:
“Le città possibili: arte e filologia nel dibattito sull’origine di Firenze da Giovanni Villani a
Leonardo Bruni,” in “Proxima Studia”: arte e letteratura a Firenze (1300-1600). Convegno
internazionale di studi (Palazzo Rucellai, 21-22 ottobre 2008), ed. Stefano U. Baldassarri,
Letteratura & Arte, 9 (2011), pp. 23-41.
“Capolavoro o ‘spamming’ cinquecentesco? Il Discorso intorno alla nostra lingua attribuito a
Machiavelli”, Testo a Fronte, 43 (2010), pp. 59-86.
“Giannozzo Manetti e Alfonso il Magnanimo”, Interpres, 29 (2010), pp. 43-95.
“Found in Translation”, in La Piazza delle Lingue. Esperienze di multilinguismo in atto. Atti
del Convegno, 21-23 maggio 2009, eds. N. Maraschio, D. De Martino, G. Stanchina
(Florence: Accademia della Crusca, 2010), pp. 237-240.
“La Invectiva in Florentinos di Antonio Loschi,” Esperienze Letterarie, 35.2 (2010), pp. 3-28.
“Like Fathers like Sons: Theories on the Origins of the City in Late Medieval Florence,”
Modern Language Notes, 124.1 (2009), pp. 23-44.
“Prime ricerche per un’edizione critica della Invectiva in Antonium Luscum,” Medioevo e
Rinascimento, 22 (2008), pp. 105-129.
“Teoria e prassi della traduzione nell’Apologeticus di Giannozzo Manetti,” Journal of Italian
Translation, 3.2 (2008), pp. 7-30.
“Breve guida bibliografica su teoria e prassi della traduzione nel primo umanesimo italiano
(1400-1450 ca.),” Testo a Fronte, 38 (2008), pp. 47-80.
“Whose Paradise? The Condition of Women in Renaissance Utopias,” in Italomania(s). Italy
and the English Speaking World from Chaucer to Seamus Heaney. Proceedings of the
Georgetown and Kent State University Conference held in Florence in June 20-21, 2005, ed.
Giuseppe Galigani (Florence: Pagliai, 2008), pp. 163-176.
“A Tale of Two Cities: Accounts of the Origins of Fiesole and Florence from the Anonymous
Chronica to Leonardo Bruni,” Studi Rinascimentali, 5 (2007), pp.29-56.
166
“Amplificazioni retoriche nelle versioni di un best-seller umanistico: Il De nobilitate di
Buonaccorso da Montemagno,” Journal of Italian Translation, 2.2 (2007), pp. 9-35.
“The Dream of Transparency: Women in Renaissance Utopias,” Esperienze Letterarie, 32.1
(2007), pp. 3-26.
“Girolamo Catena precursore di Pierre-Daniel Huet: Il Discorso sopra la traduttione delle
scienze e d’altre facultà,” Testo a Fronte, 36 (2007), pp. 5-30.
“The Taming of the Secretary: Reflections on Some English Translations of Machiavelli’s Il
Principe,” Journal of Italian Translation, 1.2 (2006), pp. 237-253.
“Scolastica e umanesimo nell’Adversus Iudaeos et gentes di Giannozzo Manetti: edizione del
VI libro,” Letteratura Italiana Antica, 7 (2006), pp. 25-75.
“Il Discorso sopra la traduttione delle scienze e d’altre facultà dell’umanista Girolamo
Catena,” Per Leggere, 6.11 (2006), pp. 133-147.
“Sapientia e meditatio mortis nella Griselda latina di Petrarca,” in L’esperienza poetica del
tempo e il tempo della storia. Studi sull’opera poetica di Francesco Petrarca, eds. Carla
Chiummo and Anatole P. Fuksas (Cassino: Dipartimento di Linguistica e Letterature
Comparate dell’Università di Cassino, 2005), pp. 433-476.
“Un’anonima vita di Giannozzo Manetti in terza rima,” Yale Italian Poetry, 8 (2004), pp. 291318.
“Translations and Originals: In Search of the Golden Mean,” in Educating in Paradise:
Teaching Literature on AACUPI Programs (Georgetown University at Villa Le Balze,
Fiesole, 25 October 2003), ed. Portia Prebys (Florence: Centro Stampa 2P, 2004), pp. 12-21.
“Giannozzo Manetti, Vita di Dante, Petrarca e Boccaccio,” Testo a Fronte, 28 (2003), pp. 5124.
“Di alcuni sonetti inediti di età rinascimentale dedicati al vino e ai piaceri della tavola,” Ager
Clantius, 1 (2003), pp. 33-38.
“Clichés and Myth-Making in Giannozzo Manetti’s Biographies,” Italian History and
Culture, 8 (2002), pp. 15-33.
“Bartolomeo Scala e le origini di Firenze,” Quaderni Lucchesi, 1.1 (2000), pp. 185-208.
“Aggiunte allo stemma codicum dei Dialogi ad Petrum Paulum Histrum di Leonardo Bruni,”
Rinascimento, n.s., 39 (1999), pp.571-585.
“Agli inizi della traduttologia moderna: Il De interpretatione recta di Leonardo Bruni,” Testo
a Fronte, 21 (1999), pp.31-37.
Translation into Italian with commentary and notes of Leonardo Bruni’s De interpretatione
recta, ibidem, pp.5-30.
“Una disputa rinascimentale sul valore nutritivo del vino: il De vino et aqua di Girolamo
Mercuriale e l’inedito De vino nutrimento di Baldassarre Berni,” Schede umanistiche, n.s., 2
(1999), pp. 95-106.
167
“L’anarcheggiare stoicamente di Gian Pietro Lucini,” Italianistica, 38.1 (1999), pp.71-83.
Translation into Italian with introduction and notes of John Trevisa’s Dialogue between a
Lord and a Clerk on Translation, Testo a Fronte, 20 (1999), pp.49-63.
“Lodi medicee in un dimenticato bestseller del Quattrocento fiorentino: il Driadeo di Luca
Pulci,” Forum Italicum, 32.2 (fall 1998), pp.375-402.
“Alcuni appunti su Giotto e la poesia,” Lettere Italiane, 49.3 (1997), pp.373-391.
“ ‘Religio’, ‘Fides’, e ‘Summa Sollicitudo’ nell’arte del tradurre: la risposta di Pierre-Daniel
Huet alle Belles Infidèles,” Testo a Fronte, 16 (1997), pp.5-16.
Translation into Italian with commentary and notes of Pierre-Daniel Huet’s De optimo genere
interpretandi, Testo a Fronte, 16 (1997), pp.17-45.
“Costanti del pensiero machiavelliano nel Decennale I e nel Capitolo di Fortuna,” Italian
Quarterly, 33.129-130 (1996), pp.17-28.
“ ‘Adfluit incautis insidiosus Amor’. La precettistica ovidiana nel Filostrato di Boccaccio,”
Rivista di Studi Italiani, 14.2 (1996), pp. 20-42.
“Milizia e Fortuna nei primi scritti di Machiavelli,” Esperienze Letterarie, 21.4 (1996), pp.4972.
“Niccolò Niccoli nella satira di Francesco Filelfo: la tipizzazione di una maschera,” Interpres,
15 (1995), pp.7-36.
“Un testimone dei Dialogi appartenuto a Giannozzo Manetti: il ms. Pal. lat. 1598,” Interpres,
14 (1994), pp. 173-82.
Reviews in English and Italian for Modern Language Notes, Envoi, La Rassegna della
Letteratura Italiana, Italian History and Culture, Italica, Rivista di Studi Italiani, Quaderni
Lucchesi, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, Testo a Fronte, Studi Medievali, Italianistica, The
Sixteenth Century Journal, and Comparative Literature Studies.
Translations of scholarly works:
Translation into Italian of Giuseppe Mazzotta, Cosmopoiesis. The Renaissance Experiment
(Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003): Cosmopoiesis: Il progetto del Rinascimento
(Palermo: Sellerio, 2008).
Translation into Italian of James Hankins, Plato in the Italian Renaissance (Leiden-New
York: Brill 1994). In collaboration with Donatella Downey: La riscoperta di Platone nel
Rinascimento italiano (Pisa: Edizioni della Normale, 2008).
Entries to encyclopaedias and exhibition catalogues:
Coluccio Salutati e l’invenzione dell’umanesimo, eds. T. De Robertis, G. Tanturli, S.
Zamponi (Florence: Mandragora, 2008): entries on several manuscripts and Salutati’s reply to
Antonio Loschi known as Invectiva in Antonium Luscum.
Forthcoming:
Coluccio Salutati, Political Writings (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, I Tatti
Renaissance Library Series). Critical edition and translation (from Latin into English) of
168
political texts by Florentine chancellor Coluccio Salutati (d. 1406). In collaboration with Rolf
Bagemihl.
Umanesimo e università in Toscana (1400-1600). Editing of conference proceedings on
university culture and the humanities in Renaissance Tuscany. The conference was held in
Florence on 27-28 May 2011 and organized in collaboration with Georgetown University at
Villa Le Balze and Accademia ‘La Colombaria’. The volume will be published in November
2012 by Casa Editrice Le Lettere.
“Lorenzo Ghiberti e Giovan Battista Gelli tra autobiografia e biografia”, Viator Multilingual
(2012). This article assesses the hypothesis suggested some thirty years ago by English art
historian Peter Murray on the possibility that Florentine Renaissance writer Giovan Battista
Gelli may have used a now lost copy of Lorenzo Ghiberti’s Commentaries (different from the
only surviving manuscript) to compose his short life of this artist in the Vite d’artisti
fiorentini.
“Girolamo Catena, un précurseur de Pierre-Daniel Huet: Le Discorso sopra la traduttione
delle scienze e d’altre facultà”, in De la traduction parfaite. Philosophie et art du traduire du
Seizième au Dix-huitième siècle, Geneva, Droz. This contribution to a collected volume on
translation theory and practice from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century examines a
hitherto neglected treatise by Italian humanist Girolamo Catena on translating Lating and
Greek scientific prose into modern languages. Catena’s long text was published in 1581.
Large portions of it are cited in this article and translated into French.
169
Serena Baldini
Via Del Sansovino, 203
50142 Firenze
Cell. 333. 36 57 776
E-mail [email protected]
Education
At present
Centro di Ascolto e Orientamento Psicoanalitico, Pistoia, Italy
Three-year Master at The School of Counseling.
The course of study consists of 490 class hours. Internship and
Final dissertation. Personal Analysis (analisi didattica).
(Concentration field: Education) .
Currently completing internship and final dissertation.
Will conduct a Creative Writing Workshop: Le città invisibili
(8 hours).
2011
Attended an Advanced Seminar: Le forme del disagio (30 hours)
conducted by Dott. Alessandro Guidi.
2010
Attended an Advanced Seminar: La Questione Femminile
(30 hours) conducted by Dott. Alessandro Guidi, in collaboration
with the University of Rome.
2009
Completed collaboration in writing a Dictionary of Counseling .
2006
Università Ca' Foscari, Venice, Italy
Master in Didattica e Promozione della Lingua e della
CulturaItaliane a Stranieri
110 Lode /110
MA Dissertation: Issues related to the motivational aspects of
Language Learning and didactic projects for monolingual
American classes.
2002
Centro Internazionale “Giorgio La Pira”, Florence, Italy
Attended a specialization course of Language Teaching
for teachers of Italian as a second Language. (Jan. - June
2002)
1996 - 1997
Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Department of Linguistics
Completed year-long post- graduate course in Language and
Communication.
1996
Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Laurea in Lettere e Filosofia
110 Lode /110
Thesis in Moral Philosophy:
170
Vilfredo Pareto- Thoughts and Concepts of Society
Professional and Teaching Experience
2002 - present
Teaching position at the Institute of Palazzo Rucellai,
Florence. Language courses.
Teach all levels of Italian language.
2004 - present
Teaching position at Gonzaga University in Florence,
Florence. Language courses.
Teach all levels of Italian language.
Sept. 1997 Sept. 2001
Co-Founder and Director of Italian Language and Cultural
Courses, Centro Studi Filippo Brunelleschi, Florence.
Designed Italian language curriculum for five levels of study.
Designed the center’s Italian placement and proficiency exams.
Conducted educational excursions for groups from five to 25
students to Siena, Pisa, Lucca, Ferrara and Venezia.
Visited Beijing and Shanghai, China, as part of marketing
promotion plan for the center (Dec. 1999 - Jan. 2000).
Visited Slovenia as part of promotion of Centro Brunelleschi’s
partial scholarship program for students from Eastern Europe
(February 2001).
Sept. 1997 Dec. 1997
Italian Language Instructor, Scuola Palazzo Malvisi, Florence,
Italy
Taught group Italian language courses (all levels) as well as
individual lessons.
Sept. 1997 Dec. 1997
Intern as Language Instructor
Società Dante Alighieri, Florence, Italy
Taught group Italian language courses (all levels) as well as
individual lessons.
Mar. 1997
Student Teacher as part of Professional Development Course
for Teachers of Italian as a second Language, Centro Koinè,
Florence, Italy
Taught in the regular Koinè language courses for foreigners.
Publications
2010
One of Various Authors of Dizionario di Counseling e di
Psicoanalisi laica. Edited by Alessandro Guidi.
Published by Editrice Clinamen, Florence
Languages
Fluent in English and French (taught Renaissance Courses in
both languages).
Basic command of Spanish.
171
Personal Information
Date of birth : January 29, 1967 in Florence, Italy
Citizenship: Italian
Civil Status: single
Member of ILSA (National Association of Teachers of Italian
as a second Language)
References
Prof. Patrick Burke, Dean of Gonzaga University in Florence,
Via Giorgio La Pira 11/13, Florence (tel: 055 – 215226)
Dott. Alessandro Guidi, Director of The Centro di Ascolto e
Orientamento Psicoanalitico. Via Della Rosa 5, 51100 Pistoia
(tel. 0573 – 365774) e Via Trieste 16, 50100 Firenze (tel.
055- 476898) (www.centropsicoanalitico.it)
172
Erika Bianchi
Address: Viale F. Redi 231, 50144 Firenze
Phone: (+39) 340 7626429 - cell
(+39) 055 362699 - home
E-mail: [email protected]
Education
2005 Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
PhD in Ancient History
 Dissertation title: Plutarch and the Age of Demosthenes.
 Supervisors: Prof. P. Desideri (Roman History), Prof. C. Longo
Pecorella (Greek History)
2001, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
MA degree in Classics (votes 110 cum laude)
 Dissertation title: The Law of Eukrates on the Areopagos
Teaching Experience
from Jan 2005 to present, spring, fall and summer terms
Instructor of Classics
 Ancient Rome: Civilization and Legacy, The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai,
Florence, Italy (course taught in English)
 The Roman Achievement, Kent State University - Florence Program, Florence,
Italy (course taught in English)

Fall term 2012
Archaeology and Art of Ancient Italy, The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai,
Florence, Italy (team-taught with archaeologist Dr Carolina Megale)
Spring term 2011
 Etruscans and Romans, Gonzaga University Florence program (course taught
in English)

2002 - 2007
Postgraduate Demonstrator
Since undertaking my PhD I have constantly been involved with the
supervision of undergraduates in Classics. I supervised students with their final
year projects and MA dissertations at the University of Florence, and one
Masters student at Middlebury College, Florence Program. In each case this
involved assisting in project management, evaluating research work and
supporting weaknesses where necessary.
Instructor of Literature
2002-2005
173
 Contemporary Italian Literature at the Accademia Italiana di Arte, Moda e
Design, Arcadia Program, Florence, Italy (course taught in English)
2001-2002
 Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature at the Accademia Italiana di Arte,
Moda e Design, Arcadia Program, Florence, Italy (course taught in English)
Research Experience



Feb 2003 University of Erfurt, Germany
Roundtable and seminar on Law and Religion in the Ancient World
2002 University of Oxford, England, University College, Trinity term
As part of my doctorate I spent a term in Oxford attending seminars
and doing research under the supervision of Prof. Christopher Pelling, Regius
Professor of Classics.
2000-2004
Library research Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Firenze, Università
“La Normale” Pisa, Università degli Studi di Firenze.
Other Experience




2010
Novelist
Tuscan Writer of the Year prize for my first novel, Sassi nelle Scarpe,
published in April 2010 by Dario Flaccovio, an independent publishing
company from Palermo.
I’m currently working on a second novel.
from 2007 to present
Literary Translator
I translate novels from English into Italian for an important Milan publishing
company (for published translations see below).
2006 - 2008
Context Florence and Rome Docent
Context (www.contexttravel.com) is a network of scholars and specialists who
organize walking seminars in English for educated travelers. As a Context
docent, I have led such walking seminars on a weekly basis for two years in both
Florence and Rome.
1995-2000
Interpreter and Exchange Program Manager
I have been interpreter from English and French into Italian, and International
Youth Camps Manager for the Livorno City Hall’s Twinning Committee.
174
Publications

Plutarch and the Age of Demosthenes, “Ploutarchos”, forthcoming.

The Law of Eukrates: a “democratic trick?”, “Historia Antigua” 23,
2005, 313-330.

Nota sulla morte degli oratori nel 322 a. C., “Prometheus” 30 (2),
2004, 129-38.

Ancora su Eschine III, 252, “Dike” 5, 2002, 83-94.
Literary Translations




Nicholas Nicastro, Impero delle Ceneri (orig. Title Empire of Ashes),
Aliberti 2011.
Camilla Trinchieri, Cercando Alice (orig. title Finding Alice), Marcos
y Marcos 2010.
Camilla Trinchieri, Il Prezzo del Silenzio (orig. title The Price of
Silence) Marcos y Marcos 2008.
Dale Furutani, Agguato all’incrocio, (orig. title Death at the
Crossroads) Marcos y Marcos 2007.
IT Skills

Extensive knowledge of all Microsoft Office programs, use of
advanced Internet search engines.
Language Skills





Italian mother tongue
English, fluent
French, proficient
Spanish, good working knowledge
Modern Greek, Ancient Greek and Latin: only written
Interests and Achievements


Travelling, writing, reading, rollerblading, theatre, cinema.
Full clean drivers licence
Referees
Andreina Bianchini, PhD - The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Academic
Director [email protected]
Marcello Fantoni, PhD, Kent State University, Florence Program, Academic
Director [email protected]
175
Pierluca Birindelli, Ph.D.
[email protected]
http://pierluca-birindelli.blogspot.com/
Education, honors/awards
2010
Qualification as Researcher in Sociology and Cultural Anthropology, C.N.R.
(National Research Council), Department of Cultural Identity, Institute for
research on population and social policies, Rome.
2003
Ph.D. in Sociology of Culture and Communication, Department of Sociology
and Political Science, University of Florence (Grant).
1999-2002
1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Ph.D. Summer School in Theory and Methodology, Italian
Sociological Association (Grant).
1999-2003
Honor Fellow in: Sociology of Culture and Communication, Sociology of
Deviance, Psychology of Communication and Culture (Faculty of Social and
Political Science, University of Florence).
2001
Visiting Fellow, University of Texas at Austin, Department of
Communication and Cultural Studies (Grant).
2001
Visiting Fellow, Permanent Seminary: “Les processus d’européanisation”,
Institut d’Etudes Politiques, SciencePo, Paris (Grant).
1999
1998
M.A., Media, Communication and Cultural Studies, University of Florence
(Grant).
Laurea in Political Science. Discipline: Sociology of Culture and
Communication, University of Florence.
Teaching
2011
Adj. Professor, Italian Cultural History, CET Academic Program (Affiliated
Vanderbilt
University), Florence and Siena.
2010-2011
Adj. Professor, Identity and Culture. A narrative and holistic approach,
Qualitative Methods Unit, International Research Master´s in Social Sciences,
University of Helsinki.
2010-2011
Adj. Professor, Identity and Culture in Italy. A comparative approach,
International Studies Institute (University of Connecticut, Pennsylvania State
University, University of Virginia, Arizona State University).
2010-2011
Adj. Professor, Globalization: a European Perspective, Richmond University
(Firenze).
176
2008-2011
Adj. Professor: Cultural Globalization: a Euro-American Perspective,
Sociology of Italian Culture; Cross Cultural Communication, Social &
Economic Development, Gonzaga University.
2008-2009
Adj. Professor, Human Development in Culture, Umbra Institute.
2008
Visiting Professor, University of Helsinki, Faculty Seminars Italian,
European and American Youngsters.
Adj. Professor: Sociology of Culture, Georgetown University.
2007-2009
2005-2007
Adj. Professor: Sociology of Generations, M.A. in Social Science Research,
University of Florence.
2001-2003
Adj. Professor: General Sociology, Faculty of Economy, University of
Florence.
2001-2003
Adj. Professor: Sociology of Organizations, Faculty of Economy, University
of Florence.
2001-2003
Adj. Professor: Sociology and Psychology of Culture and Communication,
M.A. in Media, Communication and Cultural Studies, University of Florence.
2001-2002
Adj. Professor: Narrative Approach in Social Science, M.A. in Biography,
History and Society, University of Rome La Sapienza.
2001-2002
Adj. Professor: Psychology of Communication, Faculty of Political Science,
University of Florence.
1999-2002
Adj. Professor: Sociology of Culture, Faculty of Political Science, University
of Florence.
2000-2001
Adj. Professor: Sociology of Communication, Faculty of Political Science,
University of Florence.
2000-2001
Adj. Professor: Communication Strategies, M.A. in Media, Communication
and Cultural Studies, University of Florence.
2000
Adj. Professor: Qualitative Methods, 2nd Ph.D. Summer School in Theory
and Methodology, Italian Sociological Association.
Publications
Monographs
2010
I giovani italiani tra famiglia e scuola. Una cultura della dipendenza. Roma:
Aracne.
2010
Il futuro del distretto. Atteggiamenti, azioni e strategie degli attori locali. Roma:
Aracne.
2008
Sé. Concetti e pratiche. Roma: Aracne.
2006
Clicca su te stesso. Sé senza l’Altro. Roma-Acireale: Bonanno.
177
Articles
2010
How to do Words with Things, in “Vulgo.Net.”, Multilingual European Review in
Social Science, ISSN: 1213-5518, www.vulgo.net: 1-17.
2010
Giovani sindacalisti e giovani lavoratori: profili identitari e di ruolo, in
“Vulgo.Net.”, Multilingual European Review in Social Science, ISSN: 1213-5518,
www.vulgo.net: 1-13.
2009
Dall’Io al Noi all’Altro. Allenarsi al riconoscimento sostanziale, in “Lettera Fim”,
2: 10-17.
2008
Un modo ritrovato di fare esperienza: una via di uscita per l’identità dei giovani,
in “Appunti di Cultura e Politica”, XXXl, 5: 31-38.
2008
L’assemblea del circolo: We Can solo se I Care, in “Appunti di Cultura e
Politica”, XXXl, 3: 29-32.
Giovani e adulti. Il guscio anomico della società italiana, in “Lettera FIM” I, 1:
29-37.
2008
2007
2005
Rinnovare la politica: la dimensione culturale e l’onestà intellettuale, in “Appunti
di Cultura e Politica”, XXX, 6: 26-30.
L’autonomia: quanto è difficile, in “Lettera FIM”, 5/6: 21-25.
2003
Costruzioni identitarie di giovani adulti. Il racconto di sé, la sfera privata e i suoi
oggetti, in “Rassegna Italiana di Sociologia”, XLIV: 609-624.
2003
Lo spettacolo del dolore oltre il senso del luogo: l’esperienza dell’11 Settembre, in
G. Bechelloni e A. Natale (curr.) Narrazioni mediali dopo l'undici settembre.
Dialoghi e conflitti interculturali. Roma: Mediascape: 57-66.
2003
Raccontarsi per ritrovarsi: dalle biografie di 50 giovani un circolo virtuoso, in “Il
Nuovo - New Auxology”, VII, 2: 3-4.
2002
Le camere-Sé dei giovani adulti: spazi transizionali per l’autonomizzazione?, in
“Il Nuovo - New Auxology”, VI: 4: 5.
Conference Papers
2011
Simmel’s Double Boundary and the Cosmopolitan Experience in Europe:
Strangers, Wanderers and Blasé Individuals. International Conference
“Classical sociology beyond the nation-state? The quest for today’s Europe”,
Italian Sociological Association, University of Salerno, October 6-7.
2010
Playing as reality: youngsters experience in late modernity, International
Conference “Young and the Challenges of the Future”, University of Rome
“La Sapienza”, November 3-4.
2009
Young Workers and Trade Unionists: Images, Perceptions and Identities, 4th
Conference Young People & Societies in Europe and Around the
Mediterranean: “Young people, Europe, the Mediterranean. Territories,
Identities, Policies”, International Sociological Association, Forlì (Italy)
March 26th-28th.
178
2009
How to do Words with Things, 2nd Conference “Philosophy and Literature”:
“Word & Disclosure”, Gonzaga University, Florence, February 19th-21st.
2008
Self and Other Recognition. The Experience of Travel: Old and New
meanings Gonzaga in Florence Faculty Pro-Seminar, October 9.
2003
The Adolescent Room, 1st Conference “Quo vadis juvenis. Erich Fromm and
Beyond: Life Styles, Values and Character of the European Youth”,
International Erich Fromm Society (Tubingen), Bologna, 3-5 October.
2003
The Young Italian: Oneself without the Other, 6th Conference of the European
Sociological Association “Ageing Societies, New Sociology”, Murcia, Spain,
23-26 September.
2003
Cultural Conflicts in Interpersonal Communication, 2nd “Italo-Brasilian
Conference in Media and Cultural Studies”, University of Florence, 13-14
June.
2001
The Private Sphere, its Objects and the Narration of the Self, 5th Conference
of the European Sociological Association “Visions and Divisions”, August 28
- September 1, Helsinki.
Working Papers (Research Reports)
2008
FIM-CISL trade unionists: images, perceptions and identities, FIM-CISL
(Lombardy).
2007
The Future of Prato: Entrepreneur’s Cultures and Attitudes, PIN, Laboratory
of Applied Economy (University of Florence).
2006
Urban Socio-Cultural effects, Faculty of Architecture, University of
Florence.
2006
Cultural, Communicative and Organizational Obstacles, Public Sanitary
Agency.
2005
Inside School. Youth and Culture, ASEL, Institute of Social and Economic
Research, Prato.
2005
The Metropolitan Train: Economic, Social and Cultural Consequences;
Youngsters between School and Work: the Myth of Specialization, ASEL,
Institute of Social and Economic Research, Prato.
Professional Activities
1999-2010
Member of the Research Network “Biographical Perspective on European
Societies”, European Sociological Association.
2010
Member of the Board of ASAUI (Association of Scholars at American
Universities in Italy).
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2007-2010
Consultant (Professional training & coaching): “Relationship among
Generations”; “Ethic, Culture and Communication within Organizations”;
“Social, Cultural and Economic Capital”, CISL.
2001-2010
Member of “Labyrinth”, Permanent Seminary, Philosophy of Social
Sciences, University of Florence.
2005-2010
Evaluator & Review Expert, Sixth and Seventh Framework Programme:
Cultural interactions in an international perspective, Major trends in society
and their implications. European Commission, EC Science and Society,
Bruxelles.
2007-2009
Consultant (Research): “FIM-CISL trade unionists: images, perceptions and
identities”, FIM-CISL (Lombardy).
2006-2007
Consultant (Research): “The Future of Prato: Entrepreneur’s Cultures and
Attitudes”, PIN Prato, Applied Economy (University of Florence).
2006-2007
Consultant (Teaching): “Communication and negotiation strategies”, CAFCA
Consulting, Torino.
2005-2006
Consultant (Research): “Urban Socio-Cultural effects”, Faculty of
Architecture, University of Florence.
2005-2006
Consultant: Sociology of Tourism, National Academy of Tourism, Fiesole.
2004-2006
Consultant (Research): “Cultural, Communicative and Organizational
Obstacles. The introduction of new working instruments”, ASL (Public
Sanitary Agency), Department of Prevention and Epidemiology.
2004-2005
Consultant (Researches): “Inside School: Youth and Culture; Metropolitan
Train: Social Consequences; Women and Entrepreneurship; Social Capital in
Italy; Safety and Danger in the City; School and Work”. ASEL, Institute of
Social Research (funded by: Prato Province; Tuscan Region, Firenze, Prato
and Pistoia Chambers of Commerce).
2003
Consultant (Research): “Youngsters: Feelings and Actions”, Social
Observatory, Pistoia Province.
2002-2003
Consultant: Mediascape (Publisher), Roma-Firenze.
2000-2002
Didactic Coordinator and Counselor: European M.A. in Media,
Communication and Cultural Studies, University of Florence.
1999-2000
Consultant: constitution of the Bilateral Cooperation Agreements: University
of Florence and Universiteit van Amsterdam; University of Florence and
University of Texas at Austin.
1999-2000
Consultant: constitution of the European M.A. in Media, Communication and
Cultural Studies (Florence, Bradford, Dijon, Kassel, London);
1998-2003
Consultant (Professional training): Tuscany Region, FIL, Hypercampo
Foundation.
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Major Areas of Specialization
Disciplines
Sociology, Cultural Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Communication Studies, Social
Psychology, Political Science, Human Development, Qualitative and Quantitative Research
Methods, Biographical and Narrative approach.
Themes
Individual and Collective Identities; European Socio-Cultural Integration; Social, Cultural,
Symbolic and Economic Capital; Education in Comparative Perspective; Modernization and
Cultural Globalization; Media, Self and Society; Values and Self-Identity; the passage from
Youth to Adulthood; Human Development in a Comparative Perspective (American,
Northern European and Mediterranean Cultural Heritage).
181
Silvia Catitti, Ph.D.
via Giacomo Matteotti 42, 50014 Fiesole (Florence), Italy
phone / fax: (+39) 055 599 638 - cell.phone: (+39) 338 67 51 908
[email protected]
Place/Date of Birth:
Rome, Italy, December 2, 1969
Education:
Dottorato (Ph.D.) in History of Architecture, University of Rome “la
Sapienza”, Department of Architectural History, Restoration, and
Conservation
Dissertation: “The Laurentian Library in Florence: Project and
Building History from Michelangelo to the 20th Century,” advisor: A.
Bruschi
Laurea (MA) in Architecture; specialization: “Preservation and
Reuse of Architectural Patrimony”
University of Rome “la Sapienza”,
First School of Architecture “Ludovico Quaroni”
Thesis: “La Cappella Carafa in Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Roma,”
advisor: A. Bruschi, readers: P. Zampa, F. P. Fiore
Languages:
Italian (mother tongue)
English (excellent)
Latin (written, good)
Computer Programs:
Autocad, Excel, Powerpoint, Microsoft Word
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Adjunct Professor

The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Florence:
- “The Villa and the Garden” (2006-current)
- “Advanced Architectural Design Studio” (2006-2007)

New York University in Florence, Florence:
- “Architectural Design: Art Installation in Florence (2007-2008)
Architect: Enrolled in professional association in Florence since 2005, matriculation
number 6592
- free-lance, Florence and Rome (2004-current)
- remodeling and interior design for private residences
- furniture design (bookcases, tables, doors, iron works, and units for
bathrooms/kitchens)
- Studio F. S. Battaglia, Rome, interior designer, architectural assistant (19902002)
- remodeling and interior design for private residences and offices in Rome,
Florence, Venice, Sapri
- restoration of the 19th-century Church of Saint Peter Apostle in Anizok, Equatorial
Guinea
182
-
furniture design (bookcases, tables, doors, iron works, and units for
bathrooms/kitchens)
design of gardens and terraces
Jewelry Designer

Free-lance, Florence and Rome (2004-current):
- creation of necklaces, bracelets, and earrings out of collectibles
Exhibition Curator

Casa Buonarroti Foundation, Florence:
co-curator of the section on the Vestibule of Michelangelo’s Laurentian Library
(Florence), in the exhibition “Michelangelo at San Lorenzo,” P. Ruschi ed. (June 20–
November 12, 2007)
Translator and Editor

Specialized in Art and Architectural History (2001-current)
PUBLICATIONS AND RESEARCH
Essays:

Michelangelo e la monumentalità nel ricetto: progetto, esecuzione e
interpretazione, in Michelangelo architetto a San Lorenzo. Quattro problemi aperti,
exhibition catalogue (Florence, Casa Buonarroti, June 20–November 12, 2007), P.
Ruschi ed., Florence, Mandragora, 2007, pp. 91-103

The Canonry of San Lorenzo and its Cloisters. Space and Use, in San Lorenzo.
Architecture, Liturgy, and Art in a Florentine Religious Community, eds. R. Gaston
and L.A. Waldman, Florence, Villa I Tatti (in preparation)

The Laurentian Library. Patronage and Building History, ivi (in preparation)
Articles:

“L’architettura della cappella Carafa in Santa Maria sopra Minerva,” Annali di
architettura, 16, 2004, pp. 25-43

“The San Sebastianello Niche off the Spanish Steps: History, Topography, and
Architecture in Baroque Rome” (in preparation)

“The Balustrade from Donatello to Palladio: Origin, Function, and
Development” (in preparation)
LECTURES

Michelangelo’s Approach to Architecture: From Design to Construction,
Invited Lecturer, Dutch Institute for Art History, Florence, June 26, 2009

La Biblioteca Laurenziana e il suo contesto, in San Lorenzo. A Florentine
Church, International Conference, J. Connors, R. Gaston, and L.A. Waldman eds.,
Villa I Tatti, Florence, May 27-30, 2009

Michelangelo e il disegno come strumento progettuale ed esecutivo, in
Michelangelo e il linguaggio del disegno di architettura, International Symposium, G.
Maurer and A. Nova eds., Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence, January 29-31, 2009

Through Doors and Windows: A Look at Michelangelo’s Approach to
Architecture, in Rethinking Michelangelo, Ray Smith Interdisciplinary Symposium,
G. Radke ed., Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, October 3-5, 2008
183
RELEVANT COURSEWORK

project for private housing in Rome, piazzale Tiburtino (Architectural
Composition, I, Prof. Arch. P. Angeletti)

project for a Maritime Museum in Rome, along the river banks, lungotevere
delle Navi (Architectural Composition, II, Prof. Arch. M. Nicoletti)

project for the Third University Campus in Rome, Valco San Paolo
(Architectural Composition, III, Prof. Arch. G. Moneta)

project for a Museum of Contemporary Arts in Rome, Borghetto Flaminio
(Architectural Composition, IV, Prof. Arch. P. Mongelli)

town planning for Acilia, suburban development in Rome (Urban Planning, I,
Prof. Arch. L. Fonti)

town planning for the historical acropolis of Anagni, Frosinone (Urban
Planning, II, Prof. Arch. P. Falini)

research on the traditional Japanese home: structure, function and space
(Architectural Typology and Morphology, Prof. Arch. R. Battistacci)

research on examples of recent bad urban design: the arrangement of piazza
Ettore Rolli in Rome (Landscape design, Prof. Arch. L. Soprani)

project for interior design and modular components of Raffaello, the Italian
space capsule for an international orbiting space-lab (Industrial design, Prof. Arch. F.
Zuccon)
TRANSLATIONS FROM ENGLISH
2005:
 Ondate rivoluzionarie. L’arte del manifesto politico 1914-1989, a cura di Jeffrey T.
Schnapp, Milano (Skira) 2005
 Jill Dunkreton, La tecnica e il restauro dell’Adorazione dei Magi del Bramantino,
Milano (Skira) 2005
2004:
 Tiziano, ed. Stefano Zuffi, Milan (Electa) 2004: John Pope-Hennessy, Sulle tracce di
Tiziano, pp. 11-31
 Botticelli e Filippino. L’inquietudine e la grazia nella pittura fiorentina del
Quattrocento, exhibition catalogue, (Florence 2004), ed. Daniel Arasse, Pierluigi De
Vecchi and Jonathan Katz Nelson, Milan (Skira) 2004:
- Jonathan Katz Nelson, Filippino nei ruoli di discepolo, collaboratore e concorrente
del Botticelli, pp. 85-99; twenty two entries
 Filippino Lippi. “Un bellissimo ingegno”, exhibition catalogue, (Prato 2004), ed.
Maria Pia Mannini, Florence (Giunti) 2004:
- Jonathan Katz Nelson, Filippino Lippi e Prato, pp. 13-25; seven entries
 Filippino Lippi e Pietro Perugino. La Deposizione della Santissima Annunziata e il
suo restauro, ed. Franca Falletti and Jonathan Katz Nelson, Leghorn (Sillabe) 2004:
- Jonathan Katz Nelson, La pala per l’altar maggiore della Santissima Annunziata.
La funzione, la commissione, i dipinti e la cornice, pp. 22-43;
- Louis A. Waldman, Documenti inediti su Filippino Lippi e le sue opere, pp. 172-281
184
2003:
 Michelangelo. Poesia e scultura, ed. Jonathan Katz Nelson, Milan (Electa) 2003:
Jonathan Katz Nelson, Michelangelo “nuovo Apollo e nuovo Apelle”: il canzoniere
mai edito e le sculture a confronto, pp. 4-23
2002:
 Venere e Amore. Michelangelo e la nuova bellezza ideale, exhibition catalogue
(Florence 2001-2002), ed. Franca Falletti and Jonathan Katz Nelson, Florence (Giunti)
2002:
- Richard Aste, Bartolomeo Bettini e la decorazione della sua camera fiorentina, pp.
3-25;
- Jonathan Katz Nelson, La “Venere e Cupido” fiorentina: un nudo eroico femminile e
la potenza dell’amore, pp. 27-63
REFERENCES
 Prof. Arch. Carlo Achilli, Florence and Orvieto, [email protected]
 Prof. Barbara Deimling, director of Syracuse University in
[email protected]
 Prof. Arch. Pietro Ruschi, Florence and Udine, [email protected]
185
Florence,
Enrico Cecconi
Nationality: Italian
Date of Birth: 06/05/1980
Home address: Via Cesare Capoquadri 10, CAP 50053 Empoli (Firenze), Italia.
Mobile : 348 7450206
House number: 0571 920400
E-mail: [email protected]
EDUCATION
23/08/2010 to present
- Università degli studi di Venezia Ca’ Foscari, Italy
I am currently in the process of completing a Masters Degree in “Didattica e promozione
della lingua e cultura italiane a stranieri, Master Itals XII”, at Ca’ Foscari University
(Venice). The focus of the Master is on highly professional training aimed to develop
innovations in teaching Italian as a foreign language. The courses brings modern techniques
to language learning, combined with the opportunity to take part in a forum with other Italian
teachers, developing interesting conversations on grammar, methods and material to be used
in class and comparing differing teaching styles. Having completed all the exams, at present I
am working on my final thesis.
Modules: Didattica dell'italiano, Didattica dell'italiano a scuola, Didattica dell'italiano ad
adulti, Educazione interculturale e italiano L2, Fondamenti linguistici per la glottodidattica,
Fonetica, Introduzione al Cooperative Learning, La Valutazione Linguistica, Lingue e culture
d'origine, Oltre la lingua della prima comunicazione: l'italiano per studiare, Principi di
glottodidattica, Scienze dell'educazione per insegnanti di frontiera, Storia della
Glottodidattica, Tecnologie Glottodidattiche.
02/07/2004
-Università degli studi di Pisa, Italy
Degree in Modern Languages and Foreign Literature
“Laurea in Lingue e Letterature Moderne: Curriculum in linguistica, lingue europee ed
extraeuropee”.
Modules: English Language and Literature (advanced level), Spanish Language and
Literature (advanced level), French Language (beginners), Linguistic and Phonetics.
Final thesis: “Stoppard, reader of Wilde: Travesties and The importance of Being Earnest”.
Final degree mark: 110/110.
-ERASMUS year abroad:
Cardiff University, School of European Studies, September 2002- June 2003, modules
included English Language Courses in order to achieve the “First Certificate of Cambridge”.
1998-99
- Liceo Scientifico “Il Pontormo”, Empoli (Firenze)
Diploma di Maturità Scientifica.
WORK EXPERIENCE
September 2009 to present
“New York University in Florence” (NYU - Villa la Pietra) – Via Bolognese 120 – 50139,
Firenze.
Italian Language Instructor.
I am currently teaching the course “Intensive Intermediate Italian” (Fall 2011). The course is
186
designed to consolidate existing language skills (B1/B2 levels of QCER) and develop new
important grammar points (such as the subjunctive and the passive mode).
Over the years, I have also been involved in the teaching of the course “Intensive Elementary
Italian” (Fall 2010/Spring 2011). This course involves working with beginner students
mainly in grammar and communication and allows them to achieve good basic oral and
written skills and broaden their vocabulary (A1/A2 levels of QCER).
During the academic years I have been working together with other members of the Italian
Department on preparing exam papers and quizzes under the supervision of a language
coordinator. I also participate with my classes in language “Tandem” exchanges that the
NYU organizes in affiliation with Florence University at “Centro Linguistico d’Ateneo di
Firenze”.
September 2008 to present
“Accademia Europea di Firenze (AEF)” – Via Roma 4 – 50123 Firenze.
Italian Language Professor at all levels.
The Accademia is involved with Study abroad programs in affiliation with Universities from
around the world. The AEF is hosting American students from Elon University in North
Carolina- USA for Italian semester courses. I am teaching grammar and conversation and I
am responsible for the design and delivery of my own classes.
I am also coordinating extra – curricular activities for the students, such as trips and events
and Italian film nights out, which introduce students to Italian culture.
Over the last two years, the Accademia has developed a summer program (July/August) with
the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music (USA). I am involved in the
program with a number of courses in which I undertake different tasks, teaching daily Italian
Language Classes at all levels, Diction for singers and Opera Libretti to singers and
instrumentalists from the CCM Spoleto Opera Production, converging at the home of the
“Festival dei due Mondi” in Spoleto (Umbria).
In addition, I am appointed as promoter for Italian Language and Culture in Italy and abroad.
I recently held a language class in Italian “Prendi un caffè?” in occasion of the XXIV
International Fair for Languages and Cultures, Berlin Expolingua 2011 (Germany),
representing the Accademia.
Since January 2011 The Accademia has provided twice a year a “Master Class in
Glottodidattica”, addressed to Italian Language teachers coming from abroad for a
professional training in teaching Italian as a foreign Language. I am one of the instructor of
the master class, holding lessons and conducing workshops.
February 2008 to August 2008
“Scuola ABC, Istituto di lingua italiana”, Via dei Rustici 7 – 50122 Firenze.
Italian Language Instructor at all leves.
During these months I held various Italian language courses at several levels at a school for
foreigners, “ABC” in Florence. This involved teaching grammar and conversation classes
daily to a variety of different ages, both groups and individuals. I was also offering seminars
on Italian Literature and Art and taking students on school trips as a tourist guide at the week
ends, giving them an understanding of the artistic and literary heritage of the country. As a
member and teacher of the ABC School for foreigners in Florence I took part at several
courses and meetings we had within the school, where we discussed and planned together the
specific topics, grammar, methods and material to be used in class.
September 2004 – January 2008
“University of Cardiff, School of European Studies”, 65 – 68 Park Place, Cardiff, UK CF
10 3AS Università del Galles (UK).
Italian Language Department, Foreign Language Instructor.
Over the years, I was involved in the teaching of different modules: Italian grammar,
translation and conversation to 1st , 2nd and final year students. In June 2005 I attended a
187
training session on Can –8 (the language learning software package used by our students) and
I was asked by the Italian department to prepare some new material to put on this Computer
Assisted Language Learning Programme. I organized the module for year 1 and year 2
preparing a series of guided lessons and I was in charge of a Can – 8 induction for all the
students. The programme Can 8 became an integral part of the course. I also took part in open
days and participated in enrolment and pre – enrolment days.
Summer 2007 to present Interpreter. Role includes organising weddings for international
couples, which entails booking venues, arranging catering and acting as a mediator
throughout the ceremony for the guests.
2000 – 2004 - Tourist Guide.
Part-time guided tours of Tuscany during the summer period. Role included use of both the
Spanish and English language and a good grounding and knowledge of the sights.
SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS
 Excellent written, translation and conversational skills in both English and Spanish.
 Intermediate conversational, translation and written skills in French.
 ECDL (European Computer Driving Licence held).
 Intermediate certificate for French Language completed at “Ecole France Langue” (Paris)
gained after completing a two month course.
 Independence, the ability to adapt easily and self-reliance: Achieved during my five years
in UK, after having to adapt to new cultures, seek accommodation & live in amongst a
new language.
 Good learner: Quick to take up new responsibilities and requirements.
INTERESTS & ACHIEVEMENTS
I am particularly interested in the introduction of innovations in teaching Italian as a foreign
language, for this reason I constantly participate at conferences and teacher education
seminars on modern approaches to language learning, organized in Italy and abroad. The
last seminar I attended was in Rome (11 - 13 november 2011) “XXIV Corso di
aggiornamento, Il mio canto libero”, organized by Centro Plida and Società Dante Alighieri.
Languages and travel:
I have always enjoyed travelling which has enabled me to put into practice my love of
languages. I lived in UK for five years and in France for three months, giving me the
opportunity to learn new cultures and increase my interest in living and working abroad.
Music:
I am particularly interested in classical music and between 1993 and 2000 I was a keen
member of a choir in Italy. With the choir we were given the opportunity to travel to different
countries. I was also part of the Cardiff University Choir and I am currently singing as a tenor
in a group called “Pontormo singers”.
REFERENCES
Dr Fabio Vighi
Senior Lecturer
Email : [email protected]
Telephone 029 20875605
School of European Studies
Cardiff University
65 – 68 Park Place
CF10 3AS
188
Cardiff, South Wales
UK
Dr Guyda Amstrong
Lecturer in Italian
Email: [email protected]
School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures
The University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PL
UK
Address: North 1.3, Humanities Building
Phone: +44 (0) 161 275 3208
Dr Vanna Motta
Director of Italian Studies
Email: [email protected]
My employer at Cardiff University
Telephone: +44 (0) 29 20875604
School Fax: +44 (0)29 208 74946
School of European Studies
Cardiff University
65 – 68 Park Place
CF10 3AS
Cardiff, South Wales, UK.
189
PAOLO DI NARDO
Profile
Paolo Di Nardo graduated in architecture from the University of Florence, Italy, in
1985. He has also a PhD in Architectural Design, achieved in the same University.
Since early 90's architect Di Nardo coordinates a team of professionals with whom he
participates to several architectural competitions in Italy and internationally, being
awarded several times (e.g. Fondazione Michelucci award; Biennale Produzioni
Culturali Giovanili dell’Europa Mediterranea (Biennial Exhibition of young Artists
from Mediterranean European Countries) award; City of Florence Under 40s' award;
City of Florence Around 50s' award).
He works as an architect, focusing on architectural and urban design. He's very keen
also on the topics of perception and visual communication applied to architecture.
In 2003 he established the design company ARX, whose goal is the full coordination
between the several phases of building process. The company's team is able to follow
every single stage in the execution of a project (e.g. architectural structural and
facilities planning, budgeting, scheduling, construction site safety, logistics, project
managing, environmental sustainability). These allow the management of the process
at its best, focusing on the architectural concept and the successful execution of the
project. In 2004 his redevelopment project, named “Passi d'acqua e di pietra” (i.e.
Footsteps by water and stone) for the Arno river area, crossing the city of Florence,
was selected to be exhibit at the Biennale di Architettura (Architectural Biennial
Exhibition) in Venice.
He also participates with renowned international architecture firms in several
competitions for architecture, infrastructures and urban facilities. In 2006 Paolo Di
Nardo's firm, ARX, won in collaboration with Coop Himmelb(l)au (Germany) and
Heliopolis21 (Italy) the international competition for the extension of the existing
Trade Fair in Riva del Garda, Italy. The same year he won the international
competition for the new University Campus in Pisa, in collaboration with Diener &
Diener (Switzerland), Obermeyer Plannen+Beraten (Germany) and Heliopolis21
(Italy).
In 2010 he was invited by the Albanian Government to enter the international
competition for the New Albanian Parliament, in Tirana, Albania. He works as
professional consultant in urban and architecture redevelopment for the Cities of
Tirana and Scutari, Albania. Paolo Di Nardo is also Editor of the Italian (Florence
based) architecture magazine AND, published quarterly in Italy and internationally.
190
Peter J.E. Fischer, PhD
Citizenship
Address
Office Phone
Mobile phone
Email
Germany
Via B. Fortini, 54, 50125 Florence, Italy (permanent residence)
+39.055-2645910
+39.335-42.95.75
[email protected]
EDUCATION
Postgraduate Studies
1983–1986 European University Institute (EUI), Florence, Department of History and
Civilization; Final Examination: Ph.D. (awarded degree: “Doctor of the European University
Institute in History and Civilization”).
University Studies
1972–1979 Rheinisch-Westfälisch-Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen, Germany.
Departments: Philosophy, Sociology, Art History; Final Examination: Magister Artium
(M.A.).
Languages
German: mother tongue
English and Italian: fluent (excellent speaking, reading, writing)
French: (basic reading knowledge)
EMPLOYMENT RECORD AND TEACHING EXPERIENCE
08/2002-present
The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Florence; Professor of
(course subjects: Modern Italian Political History, Food
Sustainability Studies); from 01/2009-present, Associate
for Special Projects; from 09/2009-present, Head
“Sustainable Agriculture and Food Studies Program”.
08/2009-present
Gonzaga University in Florence; Professor of History (course
subjects: Modern Italian Political History).
08/2002-04/2009
The Umbra Institute, Perugia; Professor of History (course
subjects: Modern Italian Political History, Food History).
06/2001-05/2005
Richmond College, Florence; Professor of History and Sociology
(course subjects: Modern Italian State and Society).
02/1998-05/2001
Lorenzo de’ Medici Institute, Florence; Professor of Italian Studies
(course subjects: Italian Cultural Studies).
01/1993-12/1997
European University Institute, Florence; from 04/1987-12/1997,
Department of History and Civilization - Research Associate and
Research Fellow; from 06-12/1986, Special Advisor to the
President of the European University Institute, Prof. Werner
Maihofer, for the establishment of a specialized library at the
‘Historical Archives of the European Communities’ in Florence.
191
History,
History,
Director
of the
04/1990-10/1992
Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, Ebenhausen, Germany;
‘International Nuclear History Project’; Research Associate.
PUBLIC LECTURES AND PRESENTATIONS
03 March 2009
‘Cesare Barbieri Endowment Lecture’ on
Renaissance” at Trinity College, Hartford (CT).
“Italy’s
27 Febr 2009
“Sustainable Agriculture in a Historical and Cultural Perspective”,
Presentation to the Faculty of the College of Agriculture and Natural
Resources, University of Connecticut, Storrs (CT).
23 Febr 2009
“How to engage American students in local context", Faculty Toolkit
Presentation, Schreyer Honors College, Penn State University,
University Park (PA).
10 Febr 2009
‘Uguccione Ranieri di Corbello Lecture’ on “From The Culinary
Risorgimento to the Triumph of Italian Cuisine. The Definition Of
Italianness Through Food in the 19th and 20th Century” at the
Uguccione Ranieri di Sorbello Foundation, Perugia.
29 March 2003
“Machiavelli and Beyond. Teaching History and Social Sciences on
AACUPI programs”, Annual AACUPI Conference at the ‘Casa
Machiavelli’ San Casciano, Florence.
Culinary
CONFERENCE PAPERS
11-13 Sept 1990
“Zwischen Abschreckung und Verteidigung. Die Anfänge
bundesdeutscher Nuklearpolitik (1952-1957)” at the conference “Das
Nordatlantische
Bündnis
1946-1956”,
Militärgschichtliches
Forschungsamt, Freiburg i.Br.
22 June 1990
“Adenauer: ‘Wir müssen sie produzieren’. Das Projekt einer
Trilateralen Nuklearkooperation”, paper presented at the workshop
“The Project of a French-German-Italian Nuclear Cooperation” of
the French section of the NHP (Groupe d’Ềtudes français d’Histoire
de l’Armament nucléaire – GREFHAN), Paris.
25 May 1990
“Die Rezeption der US Nuklearstrategie in Bonn (1953-1957)“;
Workshop “NHP-Kolloquium zu Fragen der deutschen
Nukleargeschichte”, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, Ebenhausen.
09-10 Nov 1989
“Möglichkeiten und Grenzen westeuropäischer Nuklearkooperation
(1954-1958)”, paper presented at the meeting of the Geman section
of te “Nuclear History Program”, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik,
Ebenhausen.
20-22 Sept 1989
“West German Rearmament and the Nuclear Challenge”, paper
presented at the conference “NATO and the Founding of the Atlantic
Alliance”, jointly organized by the Harry S. Truman Library Institute
for National and International Affairs and the University of
Missouri-St. Louis at the Harry as Truman Library, Missouri (MO).
15-17 Nov 1988
“The History of the German Social Democratic Party and its Attitude
to European Integration”, paper presented at the conference
“Socialist Parties and the European Question in the 1950s”,
European University Institute, Florence.
192
03-05 May 1988
“Fundament und Dach der Europaeischen Integration zugleich? das
Projekt der Europaeischen Politischen Gemeinschaft und seine
Bedeutung für die Bonner Außenpolitik”, paper presented at the
conference “Die Eingliederung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in
die westliche Welt vom Ende der vierziger bis zum Ende der
fünfziger Jahre”, Institut für Zeitgeschichte, München.
ACADEMIC PUBLICATIONS
Books:
 Atomenergie und staatliches Interesse: Die Anfänge der Atompolitik in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland 1949-1955, Baden-Baden: Nomos 1994.
Articles:
 The Origins of the Federal Republic of Germany´s Space Policy 1959-1965 - European
and National Dimensions, Report ESA HSR-4 (Noordwijk: ESA, January 1994).

Zwischen Abschreckung und Verteidigung. Die Anfänge bundesdeutscher Nuklearpolitik
(1952-1957), in: Das Nordatlantische Bündnis 1949-1956, edited by Klaus A. Maier and
Norbert Wiggershaus, München: Oldenbourg 1993, pp. 273-292.

Articles “Europäische Atomgemeinschaft”, “Europäische Politische Gemeinschaft” and
“Fouchet-Pläne”, in: Sachwörterbuch der Europäischen Gemeinschaften, Stuttgart: Kröner
1993.

Die Reaktion der Bundesregierung auf die Nuklearisierungsproblematik (1952-1958), in:
Militärgeschichtliche Mitteilungen, edited by Militärgeschichtlichen Forschungsamt Freiburg, 52 (1993), No. 1, pp. 105-132.

Das Projekt einer trilateralen Nuklearkooperation. Französisch-deutsch-italienische Geheimverhandlungen 1957/1958, in: Historisches Jahrbuch, 1992, 112. Jg., 1 Hb., pp. 143156.

West German Rearmament and the Nuclear Challenge, in: Francis F. Heller, John Gillingham (Hrsg.), NATO. The Founding of the Atlantic Alliance and the Integration of Europe,
New York: St. Martin’s Press 1991, pp. 381-401.

Die Bundesrepublik und das Projekt einer Europäischen Politischen Gemeinschaft, in: L.
Herbst, W. Bührer, H. Sowade (eds.), Vom Marshallplan zur EWG. Die Eingliederung der
Bundesrepublik in die westliche Welt, München: Oldenbourg 1990, pp. 279-299.

Die Anfänge der Atompolitik in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland im Spannungsfeld von
Kontrolle, Kooperation und Konkurrenz, Ph.D. Thesis, European University Institute,
Florence 1989.
ARTICLES OF GENERAL INTEREST

“Ernte Italien. 53 Millionen Hektoliter, der niedrigste Gesamtertrag seit 30 Jahren”,
VINUM – Das Internationale Weimagazin 1-2/1996, p. 45.

“Lagenweine in Italien: Die Crux mit den Crus (Piemont/Toskana)”, VINUM – Das
Internationale Weimagazin 12/1995, pp. 32-37.
193

“Italien, das Rebsortenparadies. Verkannte Rebsorten in Italien”, VINUM – Das
Internationale Weimagazin 11/1995, pp. 26-28.

“Das ABC der italienischen Bar”, VINUM – Das Internationale Weimagazin 11/1995, pp.
50-51.

“Toskana (Guide Vinum): Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 1991, Brunello 1990, Chianti
Classico 1993”, VINUM – Das Internationale Weimagazin 10/1995, pp. 60-65.

“Maremma im Aufbruch: Rückseite der Toskana”, VINUM – Das Internationale
Weimagazin 10/1995, pp. 36-43.

“Südtirol - Aufstand der Autochtonen”, VINUM – Das Internationale Weimagazin 78/1995, pp. 40-51.

“Sassicaia: ein Mythos in der Retrospektive”, VINUM – Das Internationale Weimagazin
6/1995, p. 91.

“Kalabrien (Guide Vinum)”, VINUM – Das Internationale Weimagazin 5/1995, p. 65.

“Kalabrien: Kampf zwischen Licht und Schatten”, VINUM – Das Internationale
Weimagazin 5/1995, pp. 38-43.
RELEVANT ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCES
06-12/2000
Proposal, Organization and Execution of the International
Conference “MITOS. Il Mito del Vino Italiano” from 12/7 to 12/8
at Santa Maria Della Scala, Siena; Chair on the panel ‘Origine ed
evoluzione della cutura del vino in toscana’”.
01-12/1995
Collaboration (free lance) with the international wine journal
“VINUM”, Zurich.
02/1993 - 10/1994
Member of the administrative council of the cultural association
“Amici della Lingua tedesca”, Florence.
1994/1996
Development of the executive project “Creation of a German
School in Florence”.
03/1985 - 1989
Organization of seminars and international conferences on the
subject of European integration, ‘European University Institute’,
Florence.
05/1984 - 12/1985
Foundation and organization of the “European Forum”, ‘European
University Institute’, Florence.
194
Diletta Frescobaldi
Personal details
Address: Via Santo Spirito 11, 50125 Florence, Italy
Telephone (mobile) +39 335 74.91.013
E-mail: [email protected]
Date of birth: 1 Jan 1973
Place of birth: Florence, Italy
Nationality: Italian
EDUCATION
Nov. 1991 - April 1997 Laurea (M.A.) in Economics and Business Administration
(“Economia e Commercio”) at Università di Firenze
Grade 110/110 cum laude
Doctorate Thesis on “International Strategy of Italian Wine
Companies particularly referred to the German Market”
Feb. – June 1995
ECTS (Erasmus) program at the “Ecole Superieure de Commerce” in
Rennes, France
4 exams -including international marketing, corporate strategy,
French language- all passed with distinction (30/30 )
Sept. 1993 – July 1994 Scholarship in order to participate at the Erasmus Program at the
Betriebswirtshaft Fachhoschule of Aachen, Germany
7 exams -including marketing, German language- all passed with
distinction (30/30)
July 1991
High school Scientific Diploma at Liceo “G.B. Morgagni” in
Florence
ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
June 2004 - June 2005 Sommelier Diploma, Florence
June 2004
The evolution of the family business in the world, SDA Bocconi with
The Family Business Consulting Group
Sept. 2003 - Feb. 2004 The evolution of the family business in Italy, SDA Bocconi course
organized for the next generation of Marchesi dé Frescobaldi
April 2001
Corporate Finance Seminar, MBA-INSEAD Instructors
Oct. 2000
Strategy and Marketing Seminar, Roland Berger and MBA-INSEAD
Instructors
May 2000
Training for New Consultants in Strategy, Marketing,
Communication and PR, Roland Berger and MBA-INSEAD
Instructors
Oct. 1999
Audit Seminar, PriceWaterhouse&Cooper Instructors
WORK EXPERIENCE
May 2008- June 2008
Instructor at the Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, course: The Italian
Family Firms
Jan 2006 – to date
Instructor for the Fairfield University program in Florence and Study
Abroad Italy in Florence, courses: The art of family business, Wine
Marketing, Marketing of the Arts, International Marketing
195
June 2006 – to date
Adjunct Professor for University of Alaska (Anchorage, USA) and
Indiana State University (Indianapolis, USA), courses in Italian Wine
Culture and Wine Appreciation
Sept. 2005- to date
Collaborations in PR, Marketing, and Strategy, members of the board
of Marchesi dé Frescobaldi, Florence
July 2004 – July 2006 Adjunct Professor for the Graduate Faculty of Eastern Illinois
University (USA), courses in Italian Wine culture and Wine
appreciation
Jan. 2004 – to date
Instructor for the Wine Expertise Program and the Hospitality
Management Program of Study Abroad Italy in Florence, courses
related to: Wine Marketing, Exploring Italian wine culture, Wine
appreciation, Hotel Marketing, Special event management
Sept. 2002 – Oct. 2003 Strategic Consultant for a Repositioning Project inside the Marketing
& Sales Department of The Grand Hotel and Westin Excelsior
(Starwood Hotels & Resorts), Florence
Sept. 2001 – to date
Consultant for Marketing and Strategic Projects inside the Italian
Wine Sectors, and other sectors
Feb. 2000 – July 2001 Strategy Consultant at Roland Berger – Strategy Consultants, Milan
Various projects related to the definition of the marketing strategy,
marketing plan and brand positioning strategy
Functional competence: Strategy, Business Planning, Marketing,
Corporate Finance
Industrial competence: Food and Beverage Goods, Luxury Goods,
Transportation, Tourism.
Dec.1999 – Feb.2000
Marketing Consultant inside Amleto.com, an e-commerce start-up
project in Milan creating a new consulting company providing tax,
financial, legal, medical and engineering advice on line
Oct.1998 – Dec. 1999
Accountant and Strategy Consultant at PriceWaterhouse&Cooper,
Milan
Oct. 1997 – Oct. 1998 Financial Analyst at Italrating-Duff and Phelps Credit Rating Co.
(Mediocredito Centrale Group), Milan
May – July 1997
Trainee Accountant at the Galeotti-Flori Chartered Accountant firm
in Florence
May – July 1996
Internship inside the Marketing Department of Jacques’ Wein-depot
in Dusseldorf , a company specialized in Marketing and Sale of
Wines in Germany
ADDITIONAL WORK EXPERIENCE
June 2007
Guest Speaker for the Global Alumni Conference, organized by New
York University Stern School of Business in Villa La Pietra,
Florence
196
September 2006
Guest Speaker for “The Celebrity Chef & Sommelier Invitation”, a
special event organized by the University of Alaska in Anchorage
May 2006
Guest Speaker for the conference “The evolution of the
Mediterranean Diet: Food & Beverages” organized by the New York
University in Villa La Pietra, Florence
Nov. 2005- Sept. 2006 Guest Speaker for special events of Italian Wine culture organized by
the James Beard Foundation and the New York University (Nutrition
department) in New York (USA)
Apr. – June 2004
Consultant for the organization of a Worldwide Family Business
Conference in Florence
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Languages
Computer Skills
Sports
Other Interests
English, German, French fluent written and spoken; Spanish and
Russian beginner
Proficient knowledge of MS Office (Word, Excel, Access, Power
Point, Outlook)
Volley-ball, Swimming, Playing Tennis, Sailing, Skiing, Open water
diving diploma (PADI), Running
Playing Piano, Music, Literature, Art History, Travelling
197
Michael W. Kwakkelstein
Nationality:
Address:
Home tel.
Cell phone
E-mail
EDUCATION:
18/10/1994
Art Historian
Dutch
Via dell’Oliveta 4, Poggio Ugolino
50023 Impruneta (Fi), Italy
055-2301328
388-0609748
[email protected]
Doctoral degree in Art History, Department of Art History,
University of Leiden, The Netherlands
Dissertation title:
Leonardo da Vinci as a physiognomist. Theory and drawing practice
17/6/1988
M.A. degree in Art History, Department of Art History, University
of Leiden
EMPLOYMENT RECORD:
9/2008-present
Director Dutch University Institute for Art History, Florence/
Honorary Professor of Art History, University of Utrecht
1/2006-present
Professor of Art History, The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Florence
1/2006-9/2008
Associate Director for Academic affairs, The Institute at Palazzo
Rucellai, Florence
1/2006-7/2008
Professor of Art History, The Umbra Institute, Perugia
1/2005 – 31/12/2005
Chief curator, Department of Fine Arts, The Teyler Museum,
Haarlem
9-12/2004
Professor of Art History, The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Florence
5-6/2004
Professor of Art History (summer course ‘The history of
aesthetics’), Gonzaga University, Florence
3/1999-12/2003
The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research Senior
Research Fellow/The Dutch University Institute for Art History in
Florence
9-10/2002
Visiting Professor, The Royal Dutch Institute in Rome
4/2002- present
Guide in Italy for Dutch academic tour operator ‘Academische
Reizen’, Amsterdam.
9/2000-9/2002
Professor of Art History, Institute for Art History, University of
Amsterdam
5/1999-4/2000
Member Steering and Advisory Committee, Exhibition Rubens,
Holbein and the Dance of Death: On the acquisition of a
sketchbook, Rubenshuis, Antwerp
4/1999
Visiting Professor, Department of Art History, University of Leiden
9/1996-9/1998
Postdoctoral Research Fellow/Professor of Art History, Department
of Art History, University of Leiden
198
5/1996-3/1997
Lecturer, Glerum Actioneer’s of Art and Antique, The Hague
3/1996-1/1997
Lecturer, Adult Education Centre, The Hague.
9/1995-3/1996
Member Advisory Committee Exhibition Leonardo da Vinci
Artist, Scientist, Inventor, Kunsthal, Rotterdam.
3/1993-1/1994
The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research Postgraduate
Research Fellow/Department of Art History, University of Leiden
3/1989-3/1993
Postgraduate Research Fellow/Lecturer, Department of Art History,
University of Leiden
1-3/1990
Visiting Lecturer, Società Dante Alighieri, The Hague
1/1987-5/1990
9/1986-9/1987
Lecturer, Adult Education Centre, Vlaardingen
Assistant Keeper of Collections, Leiden University Print Room,
Leiden
6-11/1985
Member Steering and Advisory Committee exhibition Old Master
Drawings from the Print Room of the University of Leiden, Institut
Néerlandais, Paris
RELEVANT ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCES
 Numerous lectures on Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and various aspects of Italian
Renaissance culture (1985-present)
 Organizer of symposium on Michelangelo (17 October 2005), The Concert Hall, Haarlem
 Hosting Her Royal Highness Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands at the opening of the exhibition:
Michelangelo at the Teyler Museum, Haarlem (4 October 2005)
 General editor of the book: Michelangelo. De hand van een genie, Haarlem 2005 (Dutch edition of
Michelangelo. Closer to the Master by Hugo Chapman). This publication accompanies the
international exhibition on Michelangelo’s drawings held at the Teyler Museum, Haarlem (4
October 2005-8 January 2006).
 Reader for The Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, University of London (1997)
 Annual Leonardo da Vinci Lecture, Birkbeck College, University of London (20.10.1995)
ACADEMIC AWARDS:
 Dissertation Fellowship Leiden University (1989-1993)
 Postdoctoral Fellowship Leiden University (1996-1998)
 Postdoctoral Fellowship The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (1999-2003)
 Jan van Gelder Prize in Art History 1991/1992 for the essay: “Leonardo da Vinci’s grotesque
heads and the breaking of the physiognomic mould”, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld
Institutes, 54(1991), pp. 127-136.
PUBLICATIONS
Books
Drawing from models: Leonardo da Vinci’s working methods as a painter and sculptor, c. 300 pp.
(forthcoming)
Hugo Chapman, Michelangelo. De hand van een genie, Haarlem 2005 (editor).
Willem Goeree. Inleydinge Tot de Al-ghemeene Teycken-konst (Middelburg 1668). Een kritische
geannoteerde editie, Leiden (Primavera Pers) 1998, 168 pp.
Leonardo da Vinci as a Physiognomist. Theory and Drawing Practice, Leiden (Primavera Pers) 1994,
233 pp.
Articles
2007
 “Giorgione”, Cultoura, 35, no. 137, p. 5.
199

“The Development of the Figure Study in the Early Work of Raphael”, in H. van Veen (ed.), The
Translation of Raphael’s Roman Style, Groningen Studies in Cultural Change, vol. XXII,
Leuven/Paris/Dudley, MA, pp. 21-34.
 Book review of Dennis Geronimus, Piero di Cosimo : Visions Beautiful and Strange, (New
Haven, Yale University Press 2006) in Renaissance Quarterly, 60, no.3, pp. 918-919.
 “Ambrogio Lorenzetti”, Cultoura, 35, no. 136, p. 5
 “Perugia. Centrum van Renaissancekunst”, Cultoura, 35, no. 134, p. 34.
2006
 “Gentile da Fabriano”, Cultoura, 33, no. 129, p. 5
2005
 “Michelangelo en ontleedkunde in de Renaissance”, Teylers Magazijn, no. 88, pp. 16-23.
 “De menselijke figuur in de tekenkunst”, Teylers Magazijn, no. 87, pp. 10-12.
 “Carlo Crivelli”, Cultoura, 32, no. 125, p. 25.
2004
 “New copies by Leonardo after Pollaiuolo and Verrocchio and his use of an écorché model. Some
notes on his working method as an anatomist”, Apollo, vol. CLIX, no. 503, pp. 21-29.
 “Perugino in Verrocchio’s workshop: the transmission of an antique striding stance”, Paragone,
vol. 55-56, pp. 47-61.
2003
 “The Use of Sculptural models by the Master of the Pala Sforzesca”, Raccolta Vinciana 30, pp.
149-178.
 “The Meaning and Attribution of the Luigi Gallandt Terracotta Reconsidered”, Raccolta Vinciana,
30, pp. 133-146.
2002
 “The Young Leonardo and the Antique”, in: ‘Aux Quatre Vents’. A Festschrift for Bert W. Meijer,
A. Boschloo, E. Grasman and G. J. van der Sman (eds.), Florence, pp. 25-32.
 “The Model’s Pose: Raphael’s Early Use of Antique and Italian Art”, Artibus et Historiae, 46, pp.
37-60.
 “Leonardo and the Low Countries”, Kleine K, February, pp. 7-11.
2001
 “Leonardo da Vinci’s Drawings of Monstrous Heads: Creative Inventions or Observed
Realities?”, in: W. Pirsig and J. Willemot (eds.), Ear, Nose and Throat in Culture, Oostende, pp.
223-242.
 “Filippino Lippi en Sandro Botticelli: fragmenten van een studieblad, ca. 1472”, in: N. Bartelings,
B. de Klerck, E.J. Sluijter (eds.) Uit het Leidse Prentenkabinet. Over tekeningen, prenten en foto’s
bij het afscheid van Anton Boschloo, Leiden, pp. 15-18.
2000
 “Verrocchio’s Drawing of Infants at the Louvre: Sources and Influence”, Kunstlicht, 21, 3-4, pp.
31-35.
 “Tekenen naar beelden en spierpoppen in de werkplaats van Leonardo da Vinci”, Desipientia, 7,
1, pp. 4-11.
 “Copying Prints as an aspect of artistic training in the Renaissance”, in: K. L. Belkin and C.
Depauw, Images of Death. Rubens copies Holbein, Antwerp, pp. 35-62.
 “Tekenen naar prentkunst in de opleiding van de schilder tussen circa 1470 en 1600”, in: K. L.
Belkin en C. Depauw, Beelden van de dood. Rubens kopieert Holbein, Antwerp, pp. 35-62.
1999
 “The Lost Book on ‘Moti Mentali’” in: Leonardo’s Writings and Theory of Art, edited with
introductions by Claire J. Farago, New York, pp. 216-229.
 “Leonardo da Vinci’s Grotesque Heads and the Breaking of the Physiognomical Mould”, in:
Leonardo’s Science and Technology: Essential Readings for the Non-scientist, edited with
introductions by Claire J. Farago, New York, pp. 195-204.
 “The Use of Sculptural Models by Italian Renaissance Painters: Leonardo da Vinci’s Madonna of
the Rocks Reconsidered in Light of his Working Procedures”, Gazette des Beaux-Arts, 133, pp.
181-198.
1998
 “Botticelli, Leonardo and a Morris dance”, Print Quarterly, XV, 1, pp. 3-14.
1997
200


“Two Weimar Drawings Rediscovered”, Achademia Leonardi Vinci, X, pp. 197-198.
“Willem Goeree and Leonardo’s Theories on Painting”, Achademia Leonardi Vinci, X, pp. 134140.
1996
 “De eerste Nederlandse editie van Leonardo da Vinci’s Paragone”, Incontri. Rivista europea di
studi italiani, 2, pp. 104-105.
1993
 “Teste di vecchi in buon numero”, Raccolta Vinciana, XXV, pp. 39-62.
 “The Lost Book on moti mentali”, Achademia Leonardi Vinci, VI, pp. 56-66.
1991
 “Leonardo da Vinci’s Grotesque Heads and the Breaking of the Physiognomical Mould”, Journal
of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, LIV, pp. 127-136.
1989
 “Goltzius’portret naar Mostaert gebruikt voor twee prenten”, Delineavit et sculpsit, 1, pp. 2-3.
1985
 “Twee tekeningen van Roelant Roghman”, in J. Bolten (ed.), Oude tekeningen van het
Prentenkabinet der Rijksuniversiteit te Leiden, The Hague/Amsterdam, pp. 194-196.
201
Tiziano Lucchesi
86 Via Samminiatese, 56027 San Miniato (Pisa), Italy
phone: +39 0550129415
cell: +39 340.6172675
[email protected]
EDUCATION
1995-2000
Academy of Fine Arts, Florence, Italy
Degree: Masters cum laude (laurea)
Concentration: Set design and fresco restoration
Minors: art history (Roman, medieval, modern, Tuscan Renaissance), ancient and modern
pictoral technique, sculpture
Thesis: "Il Restauratore nel tempo" ("The Restorer throughout the ages")
1998
Concorso di scultura Pietra Lavorata
Diploma in Stone-working, Arezzo
1997
Associazione Arte del territorio “ PI “
Diploma of Photography, Pisa
1990-1995
Art Institute of Florence (Istituto Statale d’Arte di Firenze)
1995: Diploma in Applied Arts
1993: Diploma in Fine Arts
APPRENTICESHIPS
2000
Restoration of sixteenth-century frescoes by Giovanni di San Giovanni removed from a
chapel in Piazza Santissima Annunziata, Florence, under the direction of Doctor Maricetta
Parlatore
Cathedral of San Miniato, San Miniato (Pisa)
1999
Project assistant at the Accademia, Florence
Cleaning of thirteenth century paintings on panel under the supervision of Doctor Maricetta
Parlatore, Docent of Restoration at the Accademia
Project assistant at the Museum of San Marco, Florence
Cleaning of thirteenth century paintings on panel under the supervision of Doctor Maricetta
Parlatore, Docent of Restoration at the Accademia
PROFESSIONAL TEACHING EXPERIENCE
Subjects taught: : History and technique of buon fresco; restoration of works of art on walls;
antique techniques; history of painting and pigments from prehistory to the twentieth century;
gilding; precepts for creating art on walls according to ancient and modern texts; painting in
the time of the Medicis; history of Florence; drawing; painting with modern and ancient
techniques; mosaic; furnishing; cabinet-making; set design; the workshop of the Renaissance
(preparation of materials for all the painting materials according to the antique instructions),
Old Master Techniques, Oil painting.
202
2003-present
Istituto per l’Arte e il Restauro, Palazzo Spinelli, Via Maggio, 13, Florence
Instructor of the history and technique of fresco and restoration of art on walls
January 2006 – June 2006
Institute of Liberal Arts, Palazzo Rucellai, Via della Vigna Nuova, 18, Florence
Instructor of the methodology and technique of buon freso, history of the fresco, and history
of the Renaissance. Old Master Techniques, Oil Painting, anatomic drawing.
From 2005 as needed
L’Accademia d’Arte Ad’A
Instructor of the methodology and technique of buon fresco, history and technique of mosaic,
and the history of pigments
OTHER WORK EXPERIENCE
2009
Director of the restoration of the nineteenth century skylight and ceiling owned by Guadagni
Family collocated in Piazza Santo Spirito Florence
2008
Instructor: Palazzo Pitti – Medici Chapel - Florence
Consolidation and restoration of a mural painted of the first half of the eighteenth century by
Luigi ademollo in collaboration with the restoration firm of Lidia Cinelli, Florence
(Soprintendenza per i beni culturali di Firenze)
2008
Director of Restoration: Two ceiling painted in XXth century, consolidation and retouching
2006-2007-(2008)
Instructor: Paradiso degli Aberti, Florence
Consolidation and restoration of a series of frescoes in the former monastery of Saint Brigid
from the first half of the fourteenth century in collaboration with the restoration firm of
Fabrizio Jacopini, Castelfiorentino, Florence
2006
Director of the restoration site: Eighteenth century palazzo owned by the Merlo family
Removal of a decoration done with ‘falso fresco’ from a ceiling of 43 square yards
May-June 2006
Restorer: Main chapel of the Sanctuary of Cosma e Damiano, Raice (Reggio Calabria)
Complete restoration of the paintings “a secco” by Zimatore Grillo in 1914.
2005
Director of the restoration site: Istituto Geografico Militare, Florence
Cleaning, consolidation, and retouching of a painting “fresco secco” from the seventeenth
century depicting the Natività
May-June 2005
Director of the restoration site: Palazzo dei Duchi d’Acquaviva – ATRI – Pescara (Abruzzo)
Complete restoration including the reconstruction of 80 % of the “arriccio” of a sixteenth
century fresco depicting the Natività
2004
Director of the restoration site: Palazzo Galletti, via di Sant’Egidio, Florence
203
Cleaning, consolidation, and retouching of a painting “fresco secco” from the nineteenth
century depicting landscapes
Restorer: Chiesa del Sacro Cuore in Ponte a Egola, Florence
Discovery and restoration of the vault in the apse and transept decorated with the technique of
“fresco secco”
2003
Restorer: Eleventh-century parish church of San Leonardo in Cerreto Guidi, Florence
Discovery and complete restoration of eighteenth century decoration
Restorer, Director of operations: Church of Saints Jacob and Lucy called San Domenico
Conservation and retouching of faux marble decoration
Restorer: Parish of San Miniato Basso (Pisa)
Discovery and complete restoration of eighteenth century frescoes and altars in faux marble
2002
Restorer: Cathedral of San Miniato
Complete restoration of faux marble and stucco in three chapels, the side nave, the portico,
and the transept dating from the eighteenth century
2001
Restorer: Church of San Martino a Palaia (Pisa)
Restoration of a neoclassico altar in stucco and faux marble
Restorer: Collegiata di Santa Maria a Monte (Pisa)
Complete restoration of three frescoes by Luigi Ademolli (eighteenth century) in the vault of
the apse
SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS
 Thorough knowledge of ancient techniques and artistic precepts described in the moststudied art manuscripts.
 Teacher of five years experience in various Florence institutes
 Restoration of works of art on walls since 2000, including participation in interventions of
art historical interest
 Since 1995 independent creation of more than 100 works of fresco for public and private
patrons for a total area of 2,150 square yards including the outside of a rectory, a town
hall, façades in historic centers, and a number of interiors of villas, hotels, and pubs
 Ability to paint on supports of my own creation using ancient or modern techniques in
keeping with the concept of pictorial-figurative and technical-material as shown in
various exhibitions
 More than 250 works of art in various materials including buon fresco, encausto, egg
tempera, wax, oil, mosaico, and faux marble (Affreschi, Freschi secchi, finti freschi,
pitura a calce, Encausto, encausticizzazione, Graffiti Antichi e moderni, trompe l’oeil,
grottesche medievali, decorazioni ambientali, false superfici Tempere a uovo, colle,cera,
cera fredda, cero – resine, tempera grassa,oli, oleo-Resine,caseina, Mosaico, Finti marmi
a scagliola, finti marmi a sapone, acrilici, lavabili, stereocromia silicati, poliuretanici
catalizzati ecc.)
 Ability to work in a group acquired through work in touristic areas while a student and as
a stage manager
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SELECTED WORKS OF ART
 December 08 Decoration of the Hall ceiling in a Grand Hotel Miravalle- San Miniato Pisa
 July 2007 creation of big fresco in a little town on the Como Lake, Italy
 July 2007: creation of two works with the technique of buon fresco in Taceno, near Lake
Como, Italy
 February 2007 : creation of fresco inside the academy of art with my students
 February 2006, Cow Parade, Italy. Decoration of one 51 Italian cows displayed in the
plazzas of Italy. Sold at auction to benefit the Hospital Mayer in Florence
 August, September 2005, Parish of Saint Michael di Staffoli (Pisa). Painting in
stererochrome on the bell tower of a rectory with trompe l’oeil
 October 2004, Parish of Saint Michael di Staffoli (Pisa). Painting in stereochrome on the
façade of the church depicting a saint and phrases in Latin. Creation from scratch of faux
architecture on all of the large windows that open along the sides of the building in
correspondence with the nave
EXHIBITIONS
 2000 Exhibition “ Giubileo”, Church of San Domenico, San Miniato (Pisa)
 2001 Exhibition “Il Gioco della Vita”, San Miniato
 2003 Exhibition of two works Galleria d’Arte, “Atelier d’Arte” di Franceschi Eliana,
Lucca
 2005 Personal Exhibition of 26 works, San Miniato (Pisa)
 2005 Exhibition of two works Galleria d’Arte, “Atelier d’Arte” di Franceschi Eliana,
Lucca
 2006 Collective “Oltre lo sguardo”, Comune di San Miniato (Pisa)
 2006 Personal Exhibition of 30 works “Momenti”, San Miniato (Pisa)
 2006 Personal Exhibition of 12 works “Senza titolo”, Caffè Sant’Ambrogio, Florence
 2006 Exhibition of three works Galleria d’Arte, “Atelier d’Arte” di Franceschi Eliana,
Lucca
 2007 Personal Exhibition – Portraits, San Miniato (Pisa)
 2007 Personal Exhibition – Portraits, Villa Zappala, Turin
 2008 Personal Exhibition “Speziali” castello di Lari PISA (Author Catalogue)
AWARDS AND HONORS







Luglio 2009 Selection and Prize-giving by “Muri d’Autore” and Comune di Valloria –
Imperia for a painting door in the city
October 2008 Prize-giving by “Muri d’Autore” and Comune di Gavazzana –
Alessandria Mantova, for a mural painting in the city
September 2008 Prize-giving of the contest “GUIDIZZOLO IN ARTE” held by the
Associazione Franco Bombana for a mural painting.
September 2007 Selection of the winner fresco for the “Tazio Nuvolari Museum”
Mantova
September 2007: winner of the contest “GUIDIZZOLO IN ARTE” held by the
Associazione Franco Bombana for a work of buon fresco with the theme “the colors of
speed” di un opera a Buon fresco su supporto con il tema “ I colori della Velocità
September 2007: recognition from the committee created by Vittorio Sgarbi for the
demonstration “Marentino in Rebus,” organized by the Comune of Marentino (Torino)
and the Association of Muri d’Autore, for the creation of a fresco on the façade of a
house in the historic center
February 2007: winner of the contet “PARLARTI” – “PARLASCO UN PAESE
AFFRESCATO”; selected to paint with the technique of buon fresco a historic façade in
the Comune of Parlasco nella Valsassina
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COMPUTER SKILLS
 Ability to use Windows with specific knowledge of the programs related to pictures
 Familiarity with doing research on the internet and with using email
 Knowledge of programs useful for editino of photographs such as Adobe Photoshop and
coreldrow
LANGUAGES
Italian: native speaker
English: reading knowledge good, oral ability more than sufficient
REFERENCES
Istituto per l’Arte e il Restauro, Palazzo Spinelli
Accademia d’Arte
Institute at Palazzo Rucellai
206
Gloria Marco Munuera
Via Borgo San Frediano, 35
50124 Firenze, Italia
[email protected]
www.gloriamarco.com
+39 3459682987
Education
2007–2010 - PhD by research in Fine Arts (Photography), RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
2006 - Master in Photography at the Libera Accademia di Belle Arti, Florence, Italy.
1997–2004 - B.F.A/M.A. in Fine Arts at the Polytechnic University “San Carlos”, Valencia, Spain.
2002 - Photography program Columbia College Chicago, Florence, Italy.
2002 - Promoe program at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, U.S.A.
2000–2001 - Erasmus program at the Accademia delle Belle Arti “Aldo Galli”, Como, Italy.
1993–2001 - Bachelor of Classical Music, Royal Conservatory of Music, Albacete, Spain.
Specialized Courses
2011- “Dusting on” Workshop on alternative printing technique, Arezzo&Fotografia 2011, Arezzo,
Italy.
2010- Adobe Lightroom 3 Specialization Course, Aula Imagenat, Madrid, Spain.
2010- Hand Flash and Professional Lightning Specialization Course, Aula Imagenat, Madrid, Spain.
2007- Photography workshop: PhotoEspaña with Andres Serrano, Madrid, Spain.
Employment
2011 - Currently, Professor of photography at Santa Reparata International School of Art, Florence,
Italy.
2011 - Currently, Professor of photography at Florence Design Accademy, Florence, Italy.
2010 - Currently, Professor of photography at Libera Accademia di Belle Arti, Florence, Italy.
2010 - Currently, Professor of photography at Palazzo Rucellai Institute of Fine and Liberal Arts,
Florence, Italy.
2008–2009, Freelance Photographer: INPasifika Magazine, Pacific Islands, Fiji.
2005–2007, Professor of photography at Palazzo Rucellai Institute of Fine and Liberal Arts, Florence,
Italy.
2003–2007, Professor of photography at ART.E School of Photography and Design, Italy.
2005, Cyanotype Workshop at Santa Reparata International School of Art, Florence, Italy.
207
2003, London School, Florence, Italy (Spanish language).
2001, Instructor of contemporary art for The Institute of Modern Art of Valencia (IVAM), Spain.
Scholarships and Awards
2008 Postgraduate PhD Scholarship CCM 2008, Caja Castilla de la Mancha, Toledo, Spain.
2008 Honourable Mention in Photography, 2008 Culturas “Lenguajes. Ceros y Unos”, Madrid, Spain.
2008 Finalist in the XXVI Photography Contest, “Junta Mayor de Hermandades” de Gandía, Valencia,
Spain.
2008 Finalist in the “Photography” category in the Certamen jóvenes artistas Castilla la Mancha,
Spain.
2008 Finalist in the II Festival of Digital Photography and Video ”Foconorte”, Santander, Spain.
2007, 3rd: prize Colour, XIV National Photography Contest, Burgos, Spain.
2007, 1st prize B&W, XIV National Photography Contest, Burgos, Spain.
2005, 2006, 2007 Art Scholarship from Junta de Comunidades de Castilla la Mancha, Spain.
2005 Master of Photography Scholarship from the Libera Accademia di Belle Arti, Florence, Italy.
2005 Finalist in Digital Art contest XXXII Premio Bancaixa, Valencia, Spain.
2005 Finalist in photography contest Arte Latina, Madrid, Spain.
2004, 2nd prize, Photography Contest at Certamen jóvenes artistas Castilla la Mancha, Spain.
2001, 2002, 2003, 2007 Artist Scholarship, from the Diputación of Albacete, Spain.
2001 Promoe, from the Polytechnic University “San Carlos”, Valencia, Spain.
2000 Erasmus, from the Polytechnic University “San Carlos”, Valencia, Spain.
Personal Exhibitions
2010 “Cryptographic Identity”, RMIT School of Art Gallery, Melbourne, Australia.
2007 “Ashes”, Sala de Exposiciones Centro Municipal El Carmen, Murcia, Spain.
2006 “Negraserie” Foto-Galerie Lind, Villach, Austria.
2005 “Negraserie”, Auditorium Niels Stensen, Florence, Italia.
Collective Exhibitions (selection)
(Up-coming) “4 x 4 (4 different ways of seeing photography)” Comisaría Laura Carrascal, Buenos
Aires, Argentina.
2011 “Suite Lunar: Paisajes Microscópicos” Galería Mercedes Perona, Albacete, Spain.
2011 “Macro-Micro” Santa Reparata International School of Art, Florence, Italy.
208
2010 “Snap to Grid” Los Angeles Center for Digital Art (LACDA), Los Angeles, California, USA.
2010 “Fotogenio 2010” Internacional Fair of Photography, Mazarrón, Murcia, Spain.
2010 “Fashion” Museum of Contemporary Art, St. Petersburg, Russia (catalogue).
2008 “Botanica”, Pigment Gallery, Melbourne, Australia.
2008 “Manege” Museum of Contemporary Art, St. Petersburg, Russia (catalogue).
2008 “Findings” School of Art Gallery, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
2008 XXVI “Junta Mayor de Hermandades” Casa de Cultura Marqués Gonzales, Gandía, Valencia,
Spain.
2008 “II Festival of Digital Photography and Video”, Centro Cultural Madrazo, Santander, Spain.
2007 “Certámenes Nacionales 2007” Real Monasterio de San Agustín, Burgos, Spain (catalogue).
2007 “Tripping the Light Fantastic”, Agora Gallery, New York, USA (catalogue).
2006 “Different Dimension”, Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Russia (catalogue).
2006 “Well Done”, Instituto Galileo, Florence, Italy.
2006 “Clessidra”, Vera Pietra Serena, Florence, Italy.
2006 “Lo sguardo dell’altro” Art Gallery Renessans, Florence, Italy.
2006 “Sul e dell’oggetto” Libera Accademia di Belle Arti LABA, Florence, Italy.
2005 Centro Cultural La Asuncion, Albacete, Spain (catalogue).
2005 The Institute of Modern Art of Valencia (IVAM), Valencia, Spain (catalogue).
2005 Salón de Actos Junta Municipal de Latina, Madrid, Spain.
2004 Museo Provincial, Albacete, España (catalogue).
2004 Sala de Exposiciones del Palacio del Infantado, Guadalajara, Spain.
2004 Sala de Exposiciones del Archivo Histórico Provincial, Toledo, Spain.
2004 (finger) PRINT (SACI) Studio Art Centers International, Florence, Italy.
Refereed Paper/Conference
2008 IADIS International Conference “Visual Communication 2008: Creative Industries, Photography
and Culture”
Cryptographic Identity: The Construction of Photographic Images Based on Biometric
Material Information, Amsterdam, Holland.
Publications
2009 “Art 967”, Magazine, n. July to December.
209
2009 “Impracabeza”, Digital Magazine, n. 6 September.
2009 “Hair Anthology”, Art-Book, Boccalatte Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia.
2009 “Reflejos”, Art-Book, Melbourne Reflections, Poetica Christi Press.
2006 DVD Thanatos: The Imprint of the Soul.
2006 “Photo and Video” Magazine, no. August.
2004 Isla Desnuda no.12 Winter “Beyond the Form” (pg. 14–23).
Personal Catalogs
2009 Fiji.
2008 The Light of Then.
2007 Ashes, Ayuntamiento de Murcia.
2007 Rain of Death.
Languages
Spanish – mother tongue
English – Title of Advanced English as a second language, Escuela Oficial de Idiomas, Spain.
Italian - Title of Advanced Italian as a second language, Escuela Oficial de Idiomas, Spain.
.
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CURRICULUM VITAE: DAVID MARINI
PERSONAL DATA:
Address:
Phone:
e-mail:
Date of birth:
Nationality:
Via Galleria Nazionale – 51100 Pistoia
+ 39 – 0573 – 366057
[email protected]
August 12, 1968
Italian
EDUCATION:
At present
Three-year Master at the School of Counseling. ABD,
Dissertation Title: Jaques Lacan between Hegel and
Heidegger. Psychoanalysis and History of Ideas. ).
(Centro di Ascolto ad Orientamento Psicoanalitico di
Pistoia e Firenze). The course of study consists of 490
class hours. Internship of 150 hours. Final dissertation.
Personal Analysis (analisi didattica). (Concentration
field: Mental Desease). Didactic Analysis (5 years
completed so far) currently held with Dott. Augusto
Jossa Fasano.
2010
Advanced Seminar (30 hours). Held by Dott. Alessandro
Guidi, in collaboration with the University of Rome.
Seminar Title: La questione femminile.
2008
DITALS-Level II: Teaching Certification in Italian as a
Foreign Language, Università per Stranieri di Siena
(University for Foreigners).
2007
Language Learning and Teaching Laboratory for
English Speaking Students. Teaching Italian to English
Speaking Students: a critical approach to the study of
grammar using authentic materials: Italian Culture in
Context. (May 11th. Three hours. Workshop offered by
ITALIAIDEA and ALMA EDIZIONI).
2006
Master of Arts in Italian Literature (University of
Connecticut). (Completed all the credits for the PhD
track in Italian Literature. Already published part of the
Dissertation).
2004
Specialization course in Editing and Publishing. Literary
Agency “Herzog”, Rome.
2004
Specialization course in Italian Language Teachiyng.
Comune di Firenze, ILSA (Prof. Leonardo Gandi, L2
Florence).
211
2001-2002
Graduate Courses: history of Italian Literature,
University of Connecticut, Storrs. (PhD Program).
2000-2001
Graduate Courses: history of Italian Literature,
University of Connecticut, Storrs. (PhD Program).
Language Teaching Training organized by The Modern
and Calssical Languages Department (Univ. of CT,
Storrs).
1999
Specialization course on Dante’s Divina Commedia.
Carla Rossi Academy / University of Connecticut,
Florence Study Program.
1998-1999
Graduate Courses: history of Italian Literature,
University of Wisconsin, Madison. (PhD Program).
Language Teaching Training organized by The French
and Italian Department (Univ. of WI, Madison).
1998
Specialization course on Dante’s Divina Commedia.
Carla Rossi Academy / University of Connecticut,
Florence Study Program.
1997
Laurea cum laude in Philosophy, University of Florence
Dissertation Title: Isaiah Berlin and the Pluralism of
Values: an Historical Perspective.
1989
Maturità scientifica. Scientific High School of Pistoia
ACADEMIC AWARDS AND OTHER OFFICIAL AWARDS:
2008
Qualified (May 2008) in an official national competition
(Concorso Pubblico) at the University of Florence as
Italian Linguist Expert (Esperto linguistico per
l’insegnamento
dell’Italiano).
(www.unifi.it//Personale//Reclutamento//Collaboratori//
esperti linguistici)
2007
One of the eight awarded finalists, selected for
publication, of the prestigious Poetry Prize Lerici-Pea
(Genova).
2001
Winner of a 1000 dollar Grant for a cultural project for
The Trinity College Italian Club. Prize given from the
NIAF (National Italian American Foundation)
2001
Departmental Award for Excellence, Department of
Modern and Classical Languages, University of
Connecticut
212
1999
Scholarship from The Carla Rossi Academy / University
of Connecticut, Florence Study Program
1999
Departmental Award for Excellence, Department of
French and Italian, University of Wisconsin, Madison
1998
Scholarship from The Carla Rossi Academy / University
of Connecticut, Florence Study Program
PRACTICAL AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
At present
Teaching position at the Institute of Palazzo Rucellai
Florence, since 2003. (Language courses).
Editor for the Tuscan Magazine of Montalbano
(www.montalbano.toscana.it).
Translator (From English and French) for the Prestigious
Prescott Studio of Scandicci, Florence.
06 / 2004 – 05 / 2005
Teaching position at The Lorenzo De’ Medici Institute,
Florence, (Summer course, Introduction to Italian
Philosophy. Fall Semester, From Plato to Machiavelli.
Spring Semester, Introduction to Italian Philosophy,
From Plato to Machiavelli).
Teaching position at The Institute of Fine and Liberal
Arts, Palazzo Rucellai, Florence, Language courses.
07 / 2003 – 07 / 2004
Teaching position at the Institute of Fine and Liberal
Arts, Palazzo Rucellai, Florence. Language courses,
Italian Literature, Cultural Studies.
03 / 2004
Lecturer at the British Institute, Florence, Dante and the
Medieval Age
01 / 2002 – 05 / 2002
Teaching position at The University of Connecticut,
Florence Study Program, Courses of Italian Language
and Literature
06 / 2001- 07 / 2003
Teaching position at The Clida, Centro Linguistico
Italiano Dante Alighieri, Firenze, Courses of Italian
Language
08 / 2000 – 06 / 2001
Graduate Fellow in Italian (organizer of the Italian
Club), and teaching position at Trinity College,
Hartford. Cultural Events and corse of Italian Language
and Culture
213
08 / 1998 – 05 / 2000:
Teaching Assistant at University of Connecticut, Storss,
Modern and Classical Languages Department. Courses
in Italian Language and Culture.
As a PhD candidate, helped to develop the project for a
hands-on guide for novice instructors teaching foreign
languages (tentatively titled: The Novice Instructor and
the Second Language Classroom: A Survival Guide). A
project conceived to integrate both technology and
pedagogy to enhance students’ learning.
05-06 / 1999
Teaching
Assistant
at
the
Carla
Rossi
Academy/University of Connecticut, Florence Study
Program. Lessons on the history of Philosophic
hermeneutics, and the history of the philosophy of music
Spring 2000
Assistant of the language laboratory director Barbara
Lindsey, University of Connecticut. Teaching and
Technology. The Standards, The 5C Method for the
teaching of a foreign language (Cultivating Connections:
Using technology to Integrate the Four Skills and the
Standards for Foreign Language Learning. NMLA 2001:
Le tradizioni della tavola italiana).
Organization of workshops for teaching assistants and
for high school teachers of Italian Language in
Connecticut, in collaboration with the Italian Section of
the Modern and Classical Languages Department
(University of Connecticut, Storrs).
Summer 2000
Graduate Research Technician for Prof. Norma
Bouchard (University of Connecticut). The Italian
Historical Novel of the second half of the twentieth
century.
Summer 1996
Policeman (Vigile Urbano)
04 / 1995 – 04 / 1996
Military Service
Winter 1994
Policeman (Vigile Urbano)
PUBLICATIONS
2008
Isaiah Berlin e il suo ‘inconsapevole’ Machiavelli
controcorrente. Tentativo di isolare filosoficamente il
nucleo centrale de Il Principe. Published by the Carla
Rossi Academy Press.
2006
Dante, Vincenzo Consolo and the metaphor of the door
in the Commedia, in «Sotto il velame. Rivista di studi
danteschi»
214
11 / 2005
Contributor to the 31st number (nov. 2005) of the
literary review «Prospektiva» (a piece of poetry).
06 / 2004
Some pieces of poetry, edited by Roberto Carifi, in
«Poesia», edizioni Crocetti.
04 - 06 / 2003
“Isaiah Berlin e l’idea di totalitarismo”, in «I quaderni di
Fare Storia. Rivista dell’Istituto storico di Pistoia».
06 / 2003
“Percorsi Danteschi: Il sorriso dell’ignoto marinaio di
Vincenzo Consolo e il viaggio di conoscenza di Dante”,
in «Sotto il velame. Rivista di studi danteschi»
10 / 2003
“L’albergo delle tre rose, di Augusto De Angelis”, in
«Delitti di carta».
LECTURES:
June 2003
June 2002
June 2001
June 2000
April 2000
Spring Semester 2000
Fall Semester 2000
Summer 1999
May - July 1999
Il rapporto fra soggetto e oggetto nella narrativa
contemporanea. Carla Rossi Academy/University of
Connecticut, Florence Study Program.
Riferimenti danteschi ne Il sorriso dell’ignoto marinaio
di Vincenzo Consolo. Carla Rossi Academy/University
of Connecticut, Florence Study Program.
Percorsi danteschi: il viaggio di Dante e la spirale del
consoliano
ignoto
marinaio.
Carla
Rossi
Academy/University of Connecticut, Florence Study
Program
La filosofia della storia e Il sorriso dell’ignoto marinaio
di Vincenzo Consolo. Carla Rossi Academy/University
of Connecticut, Florence Study Program
Ermeneutica e metafisica ne Il sorriso dell’ignoto
marinaio di Vincenzo Consolo. Annual Symposium of
Italian Studies (New York)
Heidegger and the Origin of the Work of Art. University
of Connecticut, Literary Criticism Seminar
Adriana Cavarero e il pensiero della differenza
sessuale. University of Connecticut, Contemporary
Italian Literature Seminar
Isaiah Berlin e il pluralismo dei valori. Carla Rossi
Academy/University of Connecticut, Florence Study
Program
Five lectures in the history of hermeneutics (Origini del
problema ermeneutico, Schleiermacher, La scuola
storica e Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer). Carla Rossi
Academy/University of Connecticut, Florence Study
Program.
215
May – July 1998
Five lectures on the history of philosophy: Music
(Pitagora – Platone - Aristotele, Agostino – Boezio,
Ficino, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche). Carla Rossi
Academy/University of Connecticut, Florence Study
Program.
LANGUAGES:
Italian:
English:
French:
Spanish:
native speaker
written and spoken, fluent (translator)
reading proficiency (translator)
reading proficiency
REFERENCES:
Prof. Andreina Bianchini, PhD, Director of The Institute at
Palazzo Rucellai, Firenze. e-mail: [email protected]
Dott. Mauro Conti, Via Aligi Barducci 1 – 50018 Scandicci,
Florence (www.prescott.it)
Dott. Alessandro Guidi, Director of The Centro di Ascolto e
Orientamento Psicoanalitico. Via Della Rosa 5 – 51100,
Pistoia (tel. 0573-365774) e Via Trieste 16 – 50100, Firenze
(tel. 055-476898)
(www.centropsicoanalitico.it)
Dott. On. Roberto Barontini, President of The Historical
Institute of Pistoia (Istituto Storico della Resistenza). Via
Olimpiadi 27 – 51100, Pistoia. (Tel. 0573-25341)
216
FRANCESCA MARINI, PHD.
PERSONAL DETAILS
Place and date of Birth: Roma, 7 may 1971
Citizen: Italian
Address: Piazza Piattellina 12, Firenze 50123
Tel. +39 349 8343701
E – mail: [email protected]
EDUCATION
2007
Dottorato di Ricerca in Storia dell’Arte Moderna (Ph.D. in Modern Art History),
Dipartimento di Storia delle Arti e dello Spettacolo, Università di Firenze, Italia.
2002
Scuola di Specializzazione di Storia dell’Arte Moderna (second year Postgraduate
Specialization School in Modern Art History), Dipartimento di Storia delle Arti e dello
Spettacolo, Università di Pisa, Italia.
2001 Idoneità al corso di Perfezionamento nelle materie storico- artistiche (Selected for
Specialization Studies in Art History), Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, Italia.
1999 Laurea in Lettere Moderne (summa cum Laude), indirizzo Storia dell’Arte Moderna
(first degree in Modern Letters (cum Laude), major in Modern Art History), Università di
Firenze, Italia
HONORS AND AWARDS
2006 - 2002 European Fellowship “Fondo Sociale Europeo” for PhD thesis, Provincia di
Firenze, Regione Toscana, Italia.
2002 Grant: “Progetto Giovani Ricercatori”, Dipartimento di Storia dell’Arte e dello
Spettacolo, Università di Firenze, Italia.
2000 First prize winner of “Premio Alberto Saibene per un Libro di Storia dell’Arte”,
Fondazione Roberto Longhi, Firenze.
PROFESSIONAL CAREER
2009 Scientific Committee Member for the exhibition: “Cultura della terra in Toscana,
mezzadri e coltivatori diretti nell’arte dell’Ottocento e Novecento” by Enrico Dei, Palazzo
Mediceo, Seravezza (Lucca), 4 luglio–28 settembre 2009.
2009 - 2007
Supervisor position at Marist College (Poughkeepsie NY) Campus in
Florence - “Lorenzo de’Medici”, via Faenza 43, Firenze. Academic supervision and
coordination of the following sections: Art History, Anthropology, Restoration.
2009 - 2002 External expert for historical and commercial appraisal of Antiques, Old Masters,
Modern and Contemporary art works for Farsettiarte, Prato-Milano-Cortina d’Ampezzo,
Italia.
Author of appraisals and auction catalogue entries published from 2004 to 2009 on the
following artists: Amedeo Modigliani, Filippo De Pisis, Mario Sironi, Giorgio de Chirico,
Alberto Savinio, Giuseppe Capogrossi, Lucio Fontana, Carlo Carrà, Ottone Rosai, Renato
Guttuso, Massimo Campigli, Ardengo Soffici, Pablo Picasso.
2008 Scientific Committee Member for the exhibition: “Terre d’Arno” by Enrico Dei and
217
Andrea Baldinotti, Palazzo Mediceo, Seravezza (Lucca), 5 luglio–12 ottobre 2008.
2006 Scientific Committee Member for the exhibition “Lorenzo Viani. Pittore e Scrittore
Espressionista”, Ancona, Mole Vanvitelliana, 1 dicembre 2006 – 18 febbraio 2007.
2005 Art historian consultant and creator of the series “I Grandi Musei” 30 monographs on
museums of the world, published by Skira ed., Milano, Italia, for “Corriere della Sera”
newspaper.
2005 - 2003
Art historian consultant and creator of for the series “I Classici dell’Arte”
published by Rizzoli ed.–Skira ed., Milano for “Corriere della Sera” (from 2006 published in
English as “Rizzoli Art Classics” by Paperback ed., in French as “Classiques de l'art” by
Flammarion ed., Paris).
2001
Founder of the on–line magazine “Predella” (www.arte.unipi.it/predella) supported
by the Dipartimento di Storia delle Arti e dello Spettacolo of Università di Pisa.
2000 Archive researcher in artistic areas commissioned by Scuola Normale Superiore (Pisa):
Salviati Archive of Pisa and Archivio di Stato of Florence.
Collaboration on PITTI project (led by Dr Miriam Fileti Mazza), supported by “Centro di
Ricerche Informatiche per i Beni Culturali della Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa”
(www.cribecu.sns.it), for the inventorying of the goods of Palazzo Pitti..
Curator of the English translations of the art history journal Proporzioni - Annali della
Fondazione Roberto Longhi - Firenze.
Teaching positions
2009 - 2008
“The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai” – via della Vigna Nuova 18, Firenze
Courses taught (all in English):
(spring, summer, fall 2008) “Masters and Monuments: The Art of Florence in Context”
(spring 2009) The Business of Art: the Economics and Management of Culture
(spring, summer 2009) “The Art of Florence In Context: Exploring Visual Culture”
2009 - 2007
Marist College (Poughkeepsie NY) Campus in Florence - “Lorenzo de’
Medici”, via Faenza 43, Firenze. Course taught (in English):
(fall-spring) “International Art Business”.
2004 – 2002
CAPA - “The Centers for Academic Programs Abroad - Florence Centre”,
Via Pandolfini, 20, Firenze. Courses held for Purdue University, Pittsburgh University,
Florida International University, Minnesota University, Ursinus College, D’Youville College.
Courses taught (all in English): “The City of Florence and the History of Italian Art from
Antiquity to High Renaissance” “A brief History of Florence through its main monuments”,
“The Art of Renaissance Florence”, “Art History from Renaissance to Nineteenth Century”
PUBLICATIONS
To be published in 2009
·
F.Marini, Tra centro e periferia: contadini e ruralismo in alcune opere della
prima metà del Novecento, “Cultura della terra in Toscana, mezzadri e coltivatori
diretti nell’arte dell’Ottocento e Novecento” by Enrico Dei, Palazzo Mediceo,
Seravezza (Lucca), 4 luglio–28 settembre 2009, Pisa, 2009.
2009
·
F.Marini, Modigliani, «SkiraMiniARTbooks», Milano.
·
F.Marini, Bacon, «SkiraMiniARTbooks», Milano.
218
2008
·
F.Marini, L’Arno, la toscanità, la Primaverile e il paesaggio attraverso
alcuni dipinti della prima metà del Novecento, in “Terre d’Arno” edited by Enrico
Dei and Andrea Baldinotti, Palazzo Mediceo, Seravezza (Lucca), 5 luglio–12 ottobre
2008, Pondera (Pisa).
·
F.Marini, catalogue entries, in Bacon, edited by Rudy Chiappini, Palazzo
Reale, Milano, 5 marzo-29 giugno 2008, Skira ed., Milano, catt. 1-91 a-b, pp. 229245 (English edition Bacon: Anthology, Skira-Rizzoli International).
·
F.Marini, Francis Bacon, «SkiraMiniARTbooks», Milano.
2007
·
F.Marini, L’attività versatile di un artista comprimario operante nella
seconda metà del Seicento. Giovanni Maria Morandi (1622 – 1717), cortigiano,
pittore, connoisseur, principe dell’Accademia e soprattutto cavaliere al servizio dei
potenti: documenti e opere, PhD thesis, Dipartimento di Storia dell’Arte e dello
Spettacolo, Università di Firenze, Italia.
·
F.Marini, Gaspar van Wittel, Michele Marieschi, Francesco Guardi,
Francesco Zanin, Giovanni Boldini, Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Giorgio de
Chirico, Filippo de Pisis, Lucio Fontana, in Golden Venice. Da Guardi a Fontana,
catalogue of the exhibition, 9 agosto-2 settembre 2007, Farsettiarte, Cortina
d’Ampezzo, Firenze, catt.1-13, pp.24-49.
2006
·
F.Marini, Quadro senza suggestioni: Lorenzo Viani ante guerra, in “Lorenzo
Viani. Pittore e Scrittore Espressionista”, Ancona, Mole Vanvitelliana, 1 dicembre
2006 – 18 febbraio 2007 Silvana ed., Milano 2006.
·
F.Marini, Caravaggio, Rizzoli Art Classics, Rizzoli International, New York.
·
F.Marini, Caravage, Flammarion ed., Paris.
·
Entries 1 - 107, in Modigliani, exhibition catalogue by R. Chiappini,
“Modigliani”, Complesso del Vittoriano, Roma, 24 February – 20 June 2006, Skira
ed., Milano 2006.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Caravaggio, preface by V.Sgarbi, Skira
ed. Milano.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Mantegna, preface by V.Sgarbi, Skira ed.
Milano.
·
F.Marini, La storia e i capolavori, in MoMa, series “I Grandi Musei”, special
edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, Milano.
·
F.Marini, La storia e i capolavori, in Uffizi, series “I Grandi Musei”, special
edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, 2, Milano 2006.
2005
·
M.Fagioli - F.Marini, Immagini del tempo passato. Una raccolta toscana di
dipinti antichi, exhibition catalogue, Capalbio (Gr), August – September, Aiòn ed.,
Firenze.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Géricault, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, special edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, ed. Rizzoli – Skira, Milano,
2005.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Mantegna, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, ed. Skira, Milano 2005.
2004
·
M.Fagioli – F.Marini, Descrivere o narrare: Disegni francesi tra
219
Naturalismo e Simbolismo. Gustave Doré (1832 – 1883) –Puvis de Chavannes (1824
– 1898) – Léon Augustin Lhermitte (1844 – 1925)– Louis Émile Adan (1839 – 1937)–
Théophile Steinlein (1859 – 1923)– René François Xavier Prinet (1861 – 1946),
exhibition catalogue, Firenze, Milano, Cagliari, October 2004 – March 2005, Aiòn
ed., Firenze, 2004.
·
Entries and biographies: Pietro Annigoni, Ardengo Soffici, Baccio Maria
Bacci, Felice Casorati, Giacomo Manzù, Giovanni Colacicchi, Lorenzo Guarnieri,
Lorenzo Viani, Marino Marini, Ottone Rosai, in Immagini del Sacro nell’Arte
Toscana del Novecento. Pittura e Scultura, ed. M. Fagioli, Montopoli Val d’Arno
(Pisa), 22 May – 20 June 2004, Aiòn ed., Firenze, 2004.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Tintoretto, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, special edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, M ed.Rizzoli – Skira, Milano,
2004.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Beato Angelico, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, special edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, ed.Rizzoli – Skira, Milano,
2004.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Modigliani, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, special edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, ed. Rizzoli – Skira, Milano,
2004.
·
F.Marini, Francis Bacon, series “Nuovi Classici dell’Arte”, special edition
for the “Corriere della Sera”, ed.Rizzoli – Skira, Milano, 2004.
2003
·
F.Marini, Entries 1 – 77, in Parmigianino by V. Sgarbi, Milano, Rizzoli ed.,
2003.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Caravaggio, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, special edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, ed. Rizzoli – Skira, Milano,
2003.
·
F.Marini, La vita e i capolavori, in Mantegna, series “Nuovi Classici
dell’Arte”, special edition for the “Corriere della Sera”, ed. Rizzoli – Skiragolden
venice, Milano, 2003.
2001
·
Il complesso museale dell’Arciconfraternita dei Pellegrini. Memorie dalla
vita quotidiana del Sodalizio, by Francesca Marini, C. De Feo, E. Perrelli, I. Giglio,
F. Scaglione, P. Visone, Napoli, 2001.
2000
·
Brevi note sul recupero dei grandi del passato in alcune opere di Vito
D’Ancona in Vito D’Ancona, aggiunte e notazioni, Montecatini, 2000
KNOWN LANGUAGES
Italian (mother tongue)
English (very good written and spoken)
French (basic knowledge spoke and written)
220
CAROLINA MEGALE
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Information
Carolina Megale
born in Livorno, Italy, 27/08/1975
Piazza G. Matteotti 52
57126 Livorno - Italy
home: +39 0586 95 96 72
cell: +39 339 75 44 894
e-mail: [email protected]
Present positions
From 2011 Lecturer at the University of Florence
2009-present President of Cultural Association Past in Progress
2009-present Principal Investigator Earthwatch Archaeological Expedition in Populonia
(Italy)
2008-present Project Scientific Director excavation Roman Villa of Poggio del Molino,
Populonia
Education
2006–2009
Univeristy of Florence. PhD in “History and Civilization of the Ancient World”
Dissertation title: “I bolli su terra sigillata ispanica: analisi critica e nuove proposte di lettura”
2008
University of Rome 3. Research Fellowship.
Research title: “Populonia romana: produzioni, merci e consumi”
2007
University of Florence. Research Fellowship
Research title: “I bolli su Terra Sigillata Ispanica: nuove proposte di lettura”
2003–2005
University of Florence. Cum laude degree (MA) in Roman Archaeology
Dissertation title: “La sigillata italica della Collezione Remedi di Sarzana”
1994–2001
University of Pisa. Cum laude degree (MA) in Conservation of Cultural Heritage
(archaeological track)
Dissertation title: “Il cd. Sacello delle Tre Navate ad Ostia Antica: nuove ipotesi per un
vecchio scavo”
Courses
2006
Univesidad Internacional de Andalucìa, Sevilla. International course
Course title: “La construcciòn de las identidades romanas”
2004
CNR and Regione Toscana. International course
Course title: “Tecnologie e metodologie innovative per lo studio e il restauro di manufatti
archeologici”
221
Research Project
2009-present
Earthwatch Institute Archaeological Expedition “Discovering Italy’s Ancient Roman Coast”
to the Roman Villa of Poggio del Molino, Populonia (Piombino, Livorno). Principal
Investigator.
2008-present
Archaeological excavation of Roman Villa of Poggio del Molino, Populonia (Piombino,
Livorno)
Project Scientific Director. Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany.
2010
Archaeological excavation of Bronze age settlement of Campiglia Vecchia, Campiglia.
Project Scientific Director. Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany.
2008
Selection and ordination of archaeological pottery finds for the section IV, V and VII of
Archaeological Museum of Ancient Ships of Pisa.
Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany.
2007
Uffizi Urban Archaeological Excavation, Florence. Fieldwork Supervisor.
Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany.
2002–2007
Archaeology Project of Provincia di Livorno. Scientific coordinator.
- Archaeological Museum System “Rete Archeologica dei Musei e Parchi Archeologici
della provincia di Livorno”
- Book: “Guida Archeologica della provincia di Livorno e dell’Arcipelago Toscana”
- Brochure for Provincia di Livorno Museum System
- web site www.archeologiaprovincialivorno.it
- Poster designing didactic-illustrative, signals, coordinate image
- Organization of educational visits to the archaeological ruins in the territory
surrounding Livorno
- Congress organization “Rete Archeologica. Valorizzazione e ricerche”
- Editing Acta “Rete Archeologica. Valorizzazione e ricerche”
- Congress organization “Il Medioevo nella provincia nella Livorno”
- Editing Acta “Il Medioevo nella provincia di Livorno. I risultati delle recenti
indagini”
- Congress organization “Archeologia Industriale nella provincia di Livorno”
1998-2007
Archaeological excavation Acropolis of Populonia. Fieldwork Supervisor.
University of Pisa, University of Siena, University of Rome 3.
2003
Archaeological excavation Sabine necropolis Colle del Forno, Montelibretti (Rome). CNR.
Archaeological excavation Cantiere Antiche Navi di S. Rossore (Pisa).
Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany.
2002
Archaeological assistance on the railroad line Pisa–La Spezia. Supervisor.
Archaeological assistance to Porta a Lucca Nuova (Pisa). Supervisor.
222
1996
Archaeological excavation Nerva’s Forum, Rome.
Superintendence for Cultural Heritage of Rome.
1995 and 1998
Archaeological excavation Roman villa of S. Vincenzino (Cecina, Livorno). University of
Pisa.
Laboratories
2002-2007
Post-excavation work
Excavation report writing and word processing
Cataloguing and processing of slides and digital photos
Finds processing and cataloguing of roman and etruscan pottery of the acropolis of Populonia
University of Pisa, University of Siena, University of Rome 3
02-03/2004
Finds processing and cataloguing of coins of Tesoretto di Rimigliano
Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany
05/1999
Finds processing and cataloguing of roman pottery of Necropoli of Porto - Isola Sacra
(Fiumicino, Roma)
Superintendence of Archaeological Heritage of Ancient Ostia
Teaching Activities and Conference Activities
S.Antonio, TX 2011
Poster “From classical archaeology to sustainable culture. The experience of Populonia”.
AIA Meeting
Firenze 2010
Lecture “Lo scavo della villa romana di Poggio del Molino: nuovi dati”
Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana, Firenze
Piombino 2010
Lecture “Lo scavo della villa romana di Poggio del Molino”
Archaeological Museum of the territory of Populonia
Marsiliana 2010
Lecture “Populonia in Roman age”
Marsiliana Project
Piombino 2009
Lecture “Archeologia e futuro. Lo scavo della villa romana di Poggio del Molino”
Associazione Archeologica Piombinese
Roma 2009
Lecture “Lo scavo della villa romana di Poggio del Molino vent’anni dopo”
University La Sapienza, Rome
Long Island, NY 2008
Lecture “Roman Populonia and the study of Poggio del Molino”
Hofstra University, NY
223
Florence 2008
Lecture “L’edificio D di Populonia”
University of Florence
Livorno 2008
Lecture “Brixia romana”
Liceo Classico “Niccolini-Palli”, Livorno
Piombino 2007
Lecture “Populonia romana: i risultati delle indagini in corso”
Associazione Archeologica Piombinese and Municipality of Piombino
Fosdinovo 06/2007
Lecture “La stele funeraria di L. Caelius Bianor”
University of Pisa
Siena 2007
Lecture “I saggi XXIV e XXV”
University of Siena
Livorno 2007
Lecture “Per terra e per mare nei santuari della divina Afrodite”
Centro Donna and Municipality of Livorno
Roma 2006
Lecture “Una lastra architettonica da Populonia”
University of Rome 3
Firenze 2006
Lecture “Il saggio XXI”
Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Tuscany
Livorno 2005
Lecture “Archeologia della provincia di Livorno”
Liceo Classico “Niccolini-Palli”, Livorno
Livorno 2005
Lecture “L’esperienza della Provincia di Livorno”
Master Comunicazione pubblica e politica
University of Pisa
Siena 2005
Lecture “Un nuovo bollo laterizio da Populonia”
University of Siena
Siena 2005
Lecture “Il saggio XX. Nuovi dati di scavo”
University of Siena
Pisa 2004
Lecture “Il saggio XX”
University of Pisa
224
Siena 2003
Lecture “Lucerne di epoca repubblicana dall’acropoli di Populonia”
University of Siena
Scientific Publications
C. MEGALE, La Terra Sigillata Italica e Tardo Italica, in A. ALBERTI, E. PARIBENI (eds.),
Archeologia in Piazza dei miracoli, Pisa i.p.
C. MEGALE, G. DE TOMMASO, F. GHIZZANI MARCÌA, La villa romana di Poggio del Molino e
il Progetto Archeodig: un nuovo approccio all’archeologia sul campo, in G. BARATTI, F.
FABIANI (eds.), Materiali per Populonia 9, Pisa 2010, pp. 163-180.
C. MEGALE, G. DE TOMMASO, F. GHIZZANI MARCÌA, Piombino (Li). Populonia, Villa di
Poggio del Molino: nuove indagini, le campagne 2008 e 2009, «Notiziario della
Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici dellla Toscana», 5/2009, 2010, pp. 352-356.
C. MEGALE, La stele funeraria di L. Caelius Bianor, Rassegna di Archeologia, 23B, 2010, pp.
141-147.
C. MEGALE, F. GHIZZANI MARCÌA (ed.), Materiali per Populonia 8, Pisa 2009.
C. MEGALE (ed.), Fare l’archeologo. Per passione e per mestiere, Livorno 2009.
C. MEGALE, L. BARTALI, E. BENVENUTI, F. GHIZZANI MARCÌA, I saggi XXIV e XXV in V.
ACCONCIA, C. RIZZITELLI (ed.), Materiali per Populonia 7, Pisa 2008, pp.19-48.
C. MEGALE, L. BARTALI, F. GHIZZANI MARCÌA, Il saggio XXI, in L. BOTARELLI, M.
COCCOLUTO, C. MILETI (ed.), Materiali per Populonia 6, Pisa 2007, pp. 39-63.
C. MEGALE, Un nuovo bollo laterizio da Populonia, in L. BOTARELLI, M. COCCOLUTO, C.
MILETI (ed.), Materiali per Populonia 6, Pisa 2007, pp. 203-212.
C. MEGALE, Una lastra architettonica con ratto di Ganimede da Populonia, in L. BOTARELLI,
M. COCCOLUTO, C. MILETI (ed.), Materiali per Populonia 6, Pisa 2007, pp. 213-220.
C. MEGALE, C. MARCUCCI (ed.), Il Medioevo nella provincia di Livorno. I risultati delle
recenti indagini, Atti del Convegno (Livorno 2005), Pisa 2006.
C. MEGALE, C. RIZZITELLI, Il saggio XX, in M.APROSIO, C.MASCIONE (ed.), Materiali per
Populonia 5, Pisa 2006, pp. 85-94.
C. MEGALE, C. MARCUCCI (ed.), Rete Archeologica. Valorizzazione e ricerche, Atti del
Convegno (Livorno 2004), Pisa 2005.
C. MEGALE, C. RIZZITELLI, I saggi di scavo del 2003. Il saggio XX, in A. CAMILLI, M.L.
GUALANDI (ed.), Materiali per Populonia 4, Firenze 2005, pp. 33-37.
C. MEGALE, Lucerne di epoca repubblicana, in M.L. GUALANDI, C. MASCIONE (ed.),
Materiali per Populonia 3, Firenze 2004, pp. 157-163.
C. MEGALE, Il ritratto imperiale nella monetazione di III secolo, in A. DE LAURENZI (ed.),
Un tesoro dal mare. Il tesoretto di Rimigliano dal restauro al museo, Pontedera 2004, pp. 2125.
C. MEGALE, Decio; Gallieno, in A. DE LAURENZI (ed.), Un tesoro dal mare. Il tesoretto di
Rimigliano dal restauro al museo, Pontedera 2004, pp. 38-39 e 51-63.
C. MEGALE, C. MARCUCCI, Schede in AA. VV., Guida Archeologica della provincia di
Livorno e dell’Arcipelago Toscano, Firenze 2003, pp. 28-35, 40, 54-63, 90-92, 116-123, 138145, 160-161, 198-201.
225
Monica Merli
Luogo e data di nascita:
Colle di Val d'Elsa (Si), 25/05/1961
Residenza:
Via di Crespello, 57 50024 Mercatale V.P. (Fi)
Tel. 349-6427418 e-mail : [email protected]
Lingua madre:
italiano
Lingue straniere:
Inglese (A2-B1)
Titoli di studio:
2010-2011
Dottorato di Ricerca in Linguistica, Università degli studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di
Linguistica. Titolo della tesi: L’italiano scritto di studenti americani a livelli avanzati di
apprendimento della lingua seconda: una prospettiva pragmatica.
2003
Master ITALS in Didattica dell’Italiano come lingua seconda, Università Ca’Foscari di
Venezia, direttore P.E. Balboni, luglio 2003, con la votazione di 110 e lode.
Titolo della tesi: La didattica per progetti come sostegno della motivazione nella classe
monolingue angloamericana.Tre esempi di percorso progettuale.
2000
Certificazione DITALS – Didattica dell' Italiano a Stranieri – Università per Stranieri di
Siena, sessione luglio 2000, con la votazione di 95 con lode su 100
1986
Laurea in Lettere Moderne presso l'Università degli studi di Siena, A.A. 1985-86 con la
votazione di 110 e lode.
Titolo della tesi: Gli anni impossibili di Bilenchi. Relatore Prof. Romano Luperini.
1980
Diploma di maturità scientifica (46/60) presso il Liceo Scientifico Statale A. Volta di Colle
di Val d’Elsa, Anno Scolastico 1979-1980
Formazione e aggiornamento
Convegni e Seminari annuali dell’ambito di interesse
Pubblicazioni:
Scrivere in Lingua Seconda per l’università. Prime riflessioni sui corsi di scrittura
presso la Sede italiana di Middlebury College, Quaderni del Dipartimento di Linguistica
dell'Università di Firenze 18: 85-96. 2008
L’italiano lingua straniera anche in Italia?, Portia Prebys (a cura di), Educating in
Paradise: Teaching Italian on AACUPI Programs, Atti della giornata di studi AACUPI, Roma
20 maggio 2005
226
La didattica per progetti come sostegno alla motivazione dei discenti in college e
programmi americani in Italia, Itals, II, 5, p.63-82 . 2004
Prospettive dell’insegnamento dell’italiano a discenti angloamericani. Bollettino Itals,
supplemento online alla rivista ITALS, n. 1, giugno 2003, www.itals.it
Osservazione e pratica nella classe monolingue angloamericana, in E. Jafrancesco (a cura
di), Ricerca-azione e apprendenti stranieri: una didattica orientata alla risoluzione dei
problemi – Atti dell’XI Convegno Nazionale ILSA, Firenze, 19 Ottobre 2002. Stampato dal
Comune di Firenze.
Presentazioni
2008
AATI/AAIS Conference, Taormina 22-25 maggio 2008. Oltre la competenza linguistica:
verso la riflessione interculturale e la consapevolezza sociolinguistica
2002
Convegno Nazionale ILSA, Firenze, 19 Ottobre 2002. Osservazione e pratica nella classe
monolingue angloamericana
Esperienze didattiche:
2003-2011
Middlebury College School in Italy, FIrenze
Programma di Master, Docente del corso di Didattica dell’italiano come lingua straniera
Programma di Master, Docente del corso di Scrittura accademica
Programma di Master, Relatore per le tesi finali del Master (Didattica della lingua)
Programma undergraduate “Teoria e pratica della scrittura in italiano”
Summer Language Program di Middlebury College, Vermont, Stati Uniti, Docente di lingua
(253 e 301)
2011
New York University in Florence
Spring Semester, Insegnante di lingua italiana
2006 - 2010
Rutgers University, Florence Program
Insegnante del corso di Conversational Italian
2004 - 2005
Università Ca’ Foscari, Venezia
Tutor on-line per il modulo di Didattica dell’italiano, Master Itals (on-line) dell’Università
Ca’ Foscari di Venezia.
Tutor per le tesi finali dei corsisti del Master Itals.,
Dal 1998 al 2005
Richmond, The American International University in London, Florence Program.
227
Insegnante di lingua italiana in tutti i semestri regolari, nei programmi estivi e nelle
orientation
A partire da Spring Semester 2002, anche con mansioni di coordinamento degli insegnanti di
italiano
1997- 2000
Centro Fiorenza, Centro di lingua e cultura italiana per stranieri, Firenze - Isola d'Elba
1993 – 1997 e 2001 – 2004
Eurocentres, Firenze
Insegnante di lingua
1992
Volkshochschule di Norimberga (Germania)
Collaborazione per un ciclo di lezioni
1989 e 1992
FIAT- IVECO, collaborazione per due corsi di formazione linguistica dei tecnici cinesi a
Nanchino, Repubblica Popolare Cinese (4 mesi +2 mesi).
Mondo Italiano Stage, Siena.
1987-1989
Centro Linguistico Italiano "Dante Alighieri" (Sienalingue), Siena
Interlingua, Colle di Val d'Elsa
228
Riccardo Pacciani
Università di Firenze
Facoltà di Architettura
Department ‘Architettura – sezione Storia’
via P. A. Micheli 2 50121 Firenze
phone: 0552055369
email [email protected]
home: via Filippo Brunelleschi 30 59100, Prato
Education
Università degli studi di Firenze
1971- 74 Facoltà di Architettura, Laurea (dissertation:
Simbologia del Sole nella politica culturale di Luigi XIV”
“Architettura e cosmologia.
1968-70 Università di Pisa
Facoltà di Ingegneria, Biennio propedeutico
University Appointments
2002-present Professor, History of Architecture, Facoltà di Architettura,
Università degli Studi di Firenze: “Storia dell’Architettura 1”
1980- 2001 Researcher, Facoltà di Architettura, Università degli Studi di Firenze
1978-80
Teaching Assistant, Department of Art History, The Pennsylvania State
University, State College, Pa
Visiting Appointments
2012
Professor, The International Studies Institute, Palazzo Rucellai,
Florence: “Architecture in Italy”
Fellowships
1978-80 Graduate Assistantship , Art History Department, The Pennsylvania
University
State
Professional Appointments
2005-2006 Working Committee Leon Battista Alberti e l’architettura Exhibition, Casa del
Mantegna, Mantova, co-curator of the section on Alberti and Firenze
1996-present Vicepresident of Centro Internazionale di Studi della ‘Gerusalemme’ di San
Vivaldo - Montaione (Fi)
1993 Working Committee “Una ‘Gerusalemme’ in Valdelsa. Storia e immagini del Sacro
Monte di San Vivaldo” permanent exhibition, San Vivaldo - Montaione (Firenze), cocurator with Guido Vannini
1991-92 Working Committee “Le tems revient – ‘l tempo si rinuova”. Feste e spettacoli
nella Firenze di Lorenzo il Magnifico” exhibition, Palazzo Medici Riccardi, Firenze, cocurator of the section on Architecture in Florence
1982-89 Member of Deputazione di Storia Patria delle Antiche Provincie Modenesi Modena
229
Publications
Books
La 'Gerusalemme' di San Vivaldo in Valdelsa, in cooperation with Guido Vannini
(Corrazzano:Titivillus edizioni), 1998
Michelangelo scultore, Eugenio Battisti ed. (Napoli: Guida Editore , 1989)
Antonello da Messina, Eugenio Battisti ed. (Palermo: Editrice Novecento, 1985)
Piero della Francesca, De prospectiva pingendi, ed. Giusta Nicco Fasola, reprint, in
cooperation with Eugenio Battisti, Franco Ghione (Firenze: Editrice Le Lettere, 1984)
Essays and Articles published:
“Disegni di Cronaca,” Opus incertum 5 (2008 [2010]): 28-37
“‘Signorili amplitudini’ a Firenze. La cappella Rucellai alla Badia di S. Pancrazio e la
Rotonda della SS. Annunziata: architettura, patronati, rituali,” in Arturo Calzona, Joseph
Connors, Francesco Paolo Fiore, Cesare Vasoli, ed., Leon Battista Alberti. Architetture e
committenti (Firenze: Olschky , 2009), I, 135-77
L’oeuvre architectural d’Alberti à Florence, in François Choay et Michel Paoli, ed., Alberti
humaniste, architecte, École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts (Musée du Louvre Éditions:
Paris, 2006), 169-91
L’abside di San Martino a Gangalandi, in Bulgarelli, Calzona, Ceriana, Fiore, eds.
(Cinisello Balsamo-Mantova: Silvana editoriale, 2006), exh. cat. (Mantova, Casa del
Mantegna), 396-401
Lapicida fiorentino, Frammento di capitello di semicolonna della lanterna della cupola di
Santa Maria del Fiore , in Bulgarelli, Calzona, Ceriana, Fiore, eds. (Cinisello BalsamoMantova: Silvana editoriale, 2006), exh. cat. (Mantova, Casa del Mantegna), 394-95
Lapicida fiorentino, Intarsio marmoreo con la divisa della vela di Giovanni Rucellai, in
Bulgarelli, Calzona, Ceriana, Fiore, eds. (Cinisello Balsamo-Mantova: Silvana editoriale,
2006), exh. cat. (Mantova, Casa del Mantegna), 393
La facciata di Santa Maria Novella, in Leon Battista Alberti e l’architettura, Bulgarelli,
Calzona, Ceriana, Fiore, eds. (Cinisello Balsamo-Mantova: Silvana editoriale, 2006), exh.
cat. (Mantova, Casa del Mantegna), 380-96
“La cappella Rucellai a San Pancrazio”;” Eberhardt. Reuwich , Edicola del Santo Sepolcro a
Gerusalemme, 1486,” in Leon Battista Alberti e l’architettura, Bulgarelli, Calzona, Ceriana,
Fiore, eds. (Cinisello Balsamo-Mantova: Silvana editoriale, 2006), exh. cat. (Mantova, Casa
del Mantegna), 368- 73
“Alberti a Firenze,” in Leon Battista Alberti e l’architettura, eds. Massimo Bulgarelli, Arturo
Calzona, Matteo Ceriana, Francesco Paolo Fiore (Cinisello Balsamo-Mantova: Silvana
editoriale, 2006), exh. cat. (Mantova, Casa del Mantegna), 536-43
Il coro conteso. Rituali civici, movimenti d’osservanza, privatizzazioni nell’area presbiteriale
di chiese fiorentine del Quattrocento, in Lo spazio e il culto. Relazioni tra edificio ecclesiale
e uso liturgico dal XV al XVI secolo, Atti delle giornate di studio, Kunsthistorisches Institut in
Florenz, Max-Plank-Istitut, 27-28 marzo 2002, Jörg Stabenow ed. (Venezia: Marsilio editori,
2006) 127-151
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“Alberti a Firenze, una presenza difficile,” in Giorgio Grassi, Luciano Patetta eds., Leon
Battista Alberti architetto (Firenze: Banca CR Firenze, 2005), 211-261
Innovazioni dall’antico, contrasti e repliche dal moderno: alcuni percorsi dell’architettura a
Firenze alla fine del XV secolo, in Tradizioni e regionalismi del primo Rinascimento italiano,
Atti del
Seminario, Facoltà di Architettura Civile, Dipartimento di Progettazione
dell’Architettura, Politecnico di Milano, 7-8 maggio 2002, ed. Cristina Loi, Luciano Patetta,
(Milano: Edizioni Unicopli, 2005), 71-83
“Un brano della città leggibile di San Vivaldo: la cappella del Monte Sion. Fondazione,
committenti, destinazioni,” in Una 'Gerusalemme' toscana sullo sfondo di due Giubilei:
1500-1525, Atti del Convegno di Studi, San Vivaldo - Montaione, 4-6 ottobre 2000, ed. Sergio
Gensini (Impruneta: SISMEL-Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2004), 129-42
Santa Maria della Pietà a Bibbona e Santa Maria delle Carceri a Prato , in La chiesa a
pianta centrale tempio civico del rinascimento, Convegno Internazionale di Studi Ferrara, 910 maggio 2000, ed. Bruno Adorni (Milano: Mondadori Electa, 2002), 80-95
“Lorenzo il Magnifico: promotore, fautore, ‘architetto’”, in Il principe architetto, Atti del
Convegno internazionale, Mantova , 21-23 ottobre 1999, eds. Arturo Calzona, Francesco
Paolo Fiore, Alberto Tenenti, Cesare Vasoli (Firenze: Leo S. Olschki editore, 2002), 377-411
Review of Michael Lingohr, Der Florentiner Palastbau der Hochrenaissance. Der
Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni in seinem historischen und architekturgeschichtlichen Kontext
(Worms: Wernersche Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, 1997), in Annali di Architettura (19992000), 344-48
La Sacrestia Vecchia. Filippo Brunelleschi, Giovanni di Averardo de' Medici e gli Operai di
S. Lorenzo a Firenze, in Wolfgang von Löhneysen, ed., Der Humanismus der Architektur in
Florenz. Filippo Brunelleschi und Michelozzo di Bartolomeo, Berliner RenaissanceGesellschaft, Spolia Berolinensia 15 (Weidmann: Hildesheim, 1999), 85-104
“L'entrata di Leone X a Firenze nel 1515, lo spettacolo, il 'possesso', l'architettura,”
Archtettura & Arte, 1 (1998), 52-8
Firenze nella seconda metà del secolo, in Francesco Paolo Fiore, ed., Storia dell'architettura
italiana. Il Quattrocento (Electa: Milano, 1998), 330-73
“ Manetti, Antonio di Tuccio,” The Dictionary of Art, 20, ed. Jane Turner (London:
MacMillan Publishers Ltd., 1996), 262-63
“Orientamenti architettonici in Piero della Francesca: Vitruvio, i ‘generi’ degli ornati,
gli edifici del primo rinascimento fiorentino”, in Città e Corte nell'Italia di Piero
della Francesca, Atti del Convegno Internazionale di Studi, Urbino, 4-7 ottobre 1992,
Claudia Cieri Via ed. (Venezia: Marsilio, 1996), 301-17
”Testimonianze per l'edificazione della basilica di San Lorenzo a Firenze, 1421-1442”,
Prospettiva 75-76 (1994): 85-99
“Bernardino Brugnoli (?), Progetto per la facciata della Cattedrale di Reggio Emilia,
Prospero Sogari, Modello per la facciata della Cattedrale di Reggio Emilia,” in Rinascimento
da Brunelleschi a Michelangelo. La rappresentazione dell'architettura, ed. Henry Millon ,
Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani (Milano: Bompiani, 1994), exh. cat. (Venezia, Palazzo
Grassi), 467-68
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“Attività professionali di Simone del Pollaiolo detto ‘il Cronaca’”, Quaderni di Palazzo Te I
(1994): 12-35
“Armonie musicali nelle architetture palladiane,” La nuova città 6 (1994, 19-31
“Caratteri d'impianto e d'architettura dell'insediamento francescano sulla Verna fra XIII e
XVI secolo,” Quaderni di vita e cultura francescana, 2 (1994), 65-89
“ Rinascimento I: Brunelleschi il capostipite"Casabella 58, 614( 1994) 38-40 (review
of Haward Saalman, Brunelleschi. The Buildings (Londra: Zwemmer, 1993)
“La costruzione della chiesa della SS. Annunziata d'Arezzo, 1491-1590,”in La chiesa della
SS. Annunziata di Arezzo nel 500° della costruzione, Atti del Convegno, Arezzo Accademia
Petrarca di Lettere, Arti e Scienze, 14 settembre 1990 (Città di Castello: Tibergraph, 1993),
79-117
“La committenza magnifica e discreta di Lorenzo de' Medici,” Casabella 56, 591 (1992), 24
“Modi della committenza d'architettura di Lorenzo il Magnifico,” in Franco Cardini ed.,
Lorenzo il Magnifico (Roma: Editalia, 1992), 155-70
“Cosimo de' Medici, Lorenzo il Magnifico e la chiesa di S. Salvatore al Monte a Firenze,”
Prospettiva 66 (1992): 27-35
“Immagini, arti e architetture nelle feste di età laurenziana,” in Paola Ventrone ed., Le tems
revient, 'l tempo si rinuova. Feste e spettacoli nella Firenze di Lorenzo il Magnifico
(Cinisello Balsamo,1992) exh. cat. (Firenze Palazzo Medici Riccardi), 119-37
“Lorenzo e le antichità romane in architettura,” in L'architettura di Lorenzo il Magnifico, ed.
Morolli, Acidini Luchinat, Marchetti, (Cinisello Balsamo: Pizzi, 1992) exh. cat. (Firenze,
Spedale degli Innocenti), 281-82
Santa Maria Maddalena de' Pazzi,in L'architettura di Lorenzo il Magnifico, ed. Gabriele
Morolli, Cristina Acidini Luchinat, Luciano Marchetti, (Cinisello Balsamo: Pizzi, 1992) exh.
cat. (Firenze, Spedale degli Innocenti), 160-63
“La "Gerusalemme" di San Vivaldo e
le informazioni sull'architettura dell'antica
Gerusalemme nel primo '500,” in Luciano Vaccaro , Francesca Riccardi, eds., Sacri Monti:
devozione, arte e cultura della controriforma, Atti del Convegno Internazionale, Villa
Cagnola, Gazzada (Va) 10-13 maggio 1990, (Milano: Edizioni Universitarie Jaca, 1992),
195-205
“Proposte di G. Rainaldi per Francesco I d'Este (1631-32)”, in Marcello Fagiolo, Maria
Luisa Madonna eds., Il Barocco Romano e l'Europa, Atti del Convegno Roma, l'Italia e
l'Europa: il barocco delle capitali,Roma 22-27 ottobre 1987 (Roma: Istituto Poligrafico e
Zecca dello Stato, 1992), 265-90
“Nuove ricerche su Antonio da Sangallo il Vecchio ad Arezzo e a Monte San Savino, 15041532,” Annali di Architettura 3 (1991), 40-57
“Nuovi rilievi dell'Anfiteatro di Boboli,” in Boboli '90, Atti del Convegno Internazionale
di Studi per la salvaguardia e la valorizzazione del Giardino di Boboli, Firenze, 9-11
marzo 1989, Cristina Acidini Luchinat, Elvira Garbero Zorzi eds., (Firenze: Edifir, 1991) II,
421-30
232
“‘Progetto Siena’: storia e regesto delle chiese”, in Casabella, 574 (1990), 23-24; review of
Peter Anselm Riedl , Max Seidel, Die Kirchen von Siena, (Munich: Bruckmann München
Verlag, 1985-, Tome 1, vol. 1, Monica Butzek, Hans Teubner, Abbadia dell'Arco - S. Biagio
“Michelangelo, Pio IV e i Certosini a S. Maria degli Angeli,” in Certose e Certosini in
Europa, Atti del Convegno Internazionale, San Lorenzo in Padula 22-24 settembre 1988
(Napoli: Sergio Civita, 1990) I, 109-26
“’del tedesco in domo’. Considerazioni sugli schemi delle volte tardogotiche nel MS B
di Leonardo”, in Maristella Casciato et alii ed., Il modo di costruire, Atti del Convegno,
Roma 6-8 giugno 1988 (Roma: Edilstampa, 1990), 147-57
“Centralità della provincia, Casabella 570 (1990), 37-38 ; review of Anna Maria Matteucci,
L'architettura del Settecento, (Torino: UTET, 1988)
Architetture e forma urbana a Novellara nel '500: il contributo di Lelio Orsi, in Jadranka
Bentini ed., Lelio Orsi e la cultura del suo tempo, Atti del Convegno Internazionale di Studi,
Reggio Emilia - Novellara, 28-29 gennaio 1988 (Bologna: Nuova Alfa, 1990), 199 - 213
“ Gli "Edifizi" di carta. Feste del carnevale a Firenze da stampe e disegni fra XV e XVI
secolo,” in Maria Chiabò, Federico Doglio eds., Il carnevale: dalla tradizione arcaica alla
traduzione colta del Rinascimento, XIII Convegno del
Centro Studi sul Teatro
Medievale e Rinascimentale, Roma 31 maggio - 4 giugno 1989 Roma: Union Printing
Editrice, 1990), 409 - 25
“Tracce per un glossario ornamentale: Firenze nel XV secolo, “ Rassegna 12 , 41, ( 1990),
11-13
Per ricordare Eugenio Battisti, 14 dic. 1924 - 18 nov. 1989, in Giulio Romano 1989, 13 20
“Giulio Romano a Ferrara, 1535”, in Giulio Romano, Atti del Convegno Internazionale di
Studi ‘Giulio Romano e l'espansione europea del Rinascimento’, Mantova, 1 - 5 ottobre
1989 (Mantova, Cariplo: 1989), 303-20
“L'architettura delle cappelle di S. Vivaldo: rapporti stilistici e iconografici,” in Sergio
Gensini ed., La "Gerusalemme di San Vivaldo e i Sacri Monti in Europa (Ospedaletto:
Pacini, 1989), 229-331
“Indizi documentari su Piero della Francesca a Perugia”, in Maria Grazia Paolini, ed.,
Ricerche su Piero, Quaderno della Cattedra di Storia dell'Arte, Facoltà di Magistero
dell'Università di Siena, Arezzo (1989), 57-68
“Barocco e rococò,” in Enciclopedia dell'Arte (Milano: Mondadori, 1988) 271-96; trans.
Baroque and Rococo, in The History of Art (New York, Gallery Books - W. H. Smith
Publishers Inc., 1989), 271-96
“Un progetto riferibile a Guarino Guarini per il convento dei Teatini
(1662),” Palladio I (1988), 83-94
di
Modena
L'architettura della chiesa e della cappelle di S. Vivaldo, in Gli abitanti immobili di San
Vivaldo il Monte Sacro della Toscana, in cooperation with A. Agnoletto et al. (Firenze:
Morgana Editrice, 1987)
233
“I modelli lignei nella progettazione rinascimentale, Rassegna 9, 32 (1987), 6-19
“Baldassarre Peruzzi 'uomo dappoco'. Motivi e fortuna di un giudizio di Vasari,” Quaderni
di Palazzo Te 7 (1987), 44-51. Reprint in Marcello Fagiolo, Maria Luisa Madonna eds.,
Baldassarre Peruzzi. Pittura scena e architettura nel Cinquecento ( Roma: Istituto della
Enciclopedia Italiana, 1987), 539-50
“Da rocca cittadina a residenza europea: forme e mutazioni del principale insediamento
estense a Modena”, in Albano Biondi ed., Il palazzo ducale di Modena, (Modena: Panini,
1987), 44-81
“Introduzione,” in Atlante dei rilievi architettonici, Ricerche sulla cultura e sull'arte del
Seicento e Settecento Estense (Modena: Artioli Editore, [1987]); reprint La provincia di
Modena» 23 (1987). See review in Notiziario del Ministero per i Beni Culturali e Ambientali
3 (17-18, 1988), 89-90
“Per una bibliografia sul manierismo nelle arti figurative (1972 -1982)”, in Daniela Dalla
Valle ed., Manierismo e letteratura Atti del Congresso internazionale, Torino, 12-15 Ottobre
1983 (Torino: Albert Meynier, 1986), 47-103
“ La "Fabbrica del grande albergo generale dei poveri" a Modena (1764-71),”in Utopie per
gli anni Ottanta. Studi interdisciplinari sui temi, la storia, i progetti, Giuseppa Saccaro del
Buffa , Arthur O. Lewis eds. ( Roma: Gangemi, 1986), 263-71
“La città come palcoscenico. Luoghi e proiezioni urbane della sacra rappresentazione nelle
città italiane fra Trecento e Quattrocento,” in Ceti sociali e ambienti urbani nel teatro
religioso europeo del '300 e del '400, Centro Studi sul Teatro Medioevale e
rinascimentale (1986), 59-82
“Il sepolcro di Claudio Rangoni attribuito a Giulio Romano nella cattedrale di Modena”, Atti
e Memorie della Deputazione di Storia Patria per le Antiche Provincie Modenesi 8
(1986), 225-54
“Temi e strutture narrative dei festeggiamenti nuziali estensi a Modena nel Seicento”, in
Marcello Fagiolo Maria L. Madonna, ed., Barocco Romano e barocco italiano :il teatro,
l'effimero, l'allegoria (Roma: Gangemi, 1985), 204-16
“Orientamenti iconografici e committenza collegata all'evangelismo in due opere di
Giulio Romano,” Quaderni di Palazzo Te I (1985), 18-27
“New Information on Raphael and Giuliano Leno in the Diplomatic Correspondence of
Alfonso I d'Este,” The Art Bulletin 67 (1985): 137-145. See review in Paolo Guerrini, Roma
nel Rinascimento (1987-88), 154
“ Collaboratore di Michelangelo: disegni per il catino dell'emiciclo del braccio meridional di
S. Pietro a Roma (cappella del Re di Francia), Giorgio Vasari: schizzi di ponteggi per gli
affreschi della cupola di S. Maria del Fiore,” in Principi, letterati e artisti nelle carte di
Giorgio Vasari, ed. Laura Corti et al. (Firenze: Edam, 1981), exh. cat. (Arezzo, sottochiesa di
S. Francesco), 166-68, 285-87
“ Aspetti dell' imitazione della natura fra '400 e '500,” in Marcello Fagiolo, ed., Natura e
Artificio (Roma: Officina, 1981), 14-54
234
“Lorenzo Ghiberti o il rinascimento senza avanguardie,” in Lorenzo Ghiberti nel suo tempo
Atti del convegno internazionale di studi, Firenze, 18-21 ottobre,1978 (Firenze: Olschki,
1980), 621-42
“Ipotesi di omologie fra impianto fruitivo e struttura spaziale di alcune opere del primo
rinascimento fiorentino: il rilievo della base del "San Giorgio" di Donatello, la ‘Trinità’ di
Masaccio, l' ‘Annunciazione’ del Convento di San Marco del Beato Angelico,” in La
Prospettiva rinascimentale, codificazioni e trasgressioni, ed. Marisa Dalai Emiliani (Firenze:
Centro D, 1980), 43-59
“Criteri dell'imitazione nella cultura artistica del primo rinascimento,”in Il potere e lo
spazio: riflessioni di metodo e contributi, Interventi al Convegno-Seminario, Firenze,
Palazzo Medici Riccardi, 16-17 giugno 1980 (Firenze,1980), 43-59
“Brunelleschi e la magnificenza,” in Filippo Brunelleschi. La sua opera e il suo tempo: Atti
del Convegno Internazionale di Studi, Firenze 16 - 22 ottobre 1977 (Firenze: Centro D,
1980), 635-44
“La Sacrestia Vecchia, San Lorenzo,” in Eugenio Battisti, Riccardo Pacciani, Elio Rodio,
Problemi brunelleschiani: Sacrestia Vecchia e San Lorenzo (Roma: Accademia Nazionale
di San Luca, 1977)
“Le fortificazioni delle Signe e del Chianti, Le coperture della Sacrestia Vecchia e delle
navate di San Lorenzo, Il tracciato delle Edicole di Santa Maria del Fiore,” in Eugenio
Battisti, Filippo Brunelleschi (Milano: Electa Editrice, 1976), 308-320, 386-387, 192-195;
trans. Robert E. Wolf, Brunelleschi The Complete Work (London: Thames and Hudson ,
1981)
“Retorica e Sublime. Aspetti del 'progettar grande'di Boullée,” Psicon 6 (1976): 43-67
“Ottheinrichsbau, la 'città celeste’ del conte palatino di Heidelberg,” Psicon 2-3 (1975): 13037
“'Heliaca’. Simbologia solare nella politica culturale di Luigi XIV,” Psicon 1, (1974): 6986
Essays in press:
“New Research on the Holy Sepulcher in the Jerusalem at San Vivaldo (Italy),” in Visual
Costructs of Jerusalem, Proceedings of the International Conference, The Hebrew University
of Jerusalem, European Forum, November 14-20, 2010, Bianca Kühnel, Galit Noga-Banai
Hanna
Vorholt
eds.
(Jerusalem)
“Cori, tramezzi, cortine e vele nello spazio interno di San Lorenzo. Tracce documentarie nel
Quattrocento,” in San Lorenzo. Architecture, Liturgy, and Art in a Florentine Religious
Community, Robert Gaston, Louis A. Waldman eds., (Florence, Villa I Tatti)
235
SIMONE PAOLI
Nationality: Italian
Place of Birth: Prato (PO)
Date of Birth: 01/08/1976
Address: via Pisana 53, 50143 Florence (FI) - Italy
Mobile Phone: 347-1922654
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
CURRENT POSITION
Research Fellow, Department of International Studies of the University of Padua
Research Project: «Europe and emerging countries from Détente to the Second Cold War»
Contract Professor of the course «The European Union», Institute of International Studies at
Palazzo Rucellai in Florence
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
2010 Postgraduate Certificate in Cold War at the University of Vienna
2005 PhD in History of International Relations at the Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Florence, with the thesis «Between the search for a new identity and the
construction of a single market: the utopia of a common education space in the European
integration process, 1961-1992»
2002 Master’s Degree in European Studies at the Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Florence, with the thesis «The ERDF contribution to the development of the
objective 2 areas in Italy, 1988-1999»
2001 University Degree at the Faculty of Political Science of the University of Florence, with
the thesis «Vocational training in the Community social policy: a European history, 19861997»
PARTICIPATION IN RESEARCH PROJECTS
1-10/2010 Grant for complementary teaching activities in the course of History of
International Relations, Faculty of Political Science of the University of Pisa
3-10/2009 Research Fellowship, Department of International Studies of the University of
Padua
Research Project: «The role of the social forces in the international organisations during the
1970s»
11/2007-12/2008 Research Fellowship, Department of International Studies of the University
of Padua
Research Project: «Europe in the international context, 1970-1980»
3-12/2007 Research Grant, San Pio V University of Rome
Research Project: «The EU Mediterranean policy»
6-9/2007 Research Grant, San Pio V University of Rome
Research Project: «The Mediterranean Sea from the Suez crisis to the Second Détente 19561975»
236
3-12/2006 Research Fellowship, Department of International Studies of the University of
Padua
Research Project: «Western Europe in the international context during the 1970s: crisis of old
order and new challenges»
1-12/2006 Research Grant, San Pio V University of Rome
Research Project: «The United Nations and the question of development in “the creative
1970s”»
RESEARCH MISSIONS
a)
Archives of international organizations
Historical Archives of the European Union, Florence
Historical Archives of the Commission of the European Union, Brussels
Historical Archives of the Council of the European Union, Brussels
Historical Archives of the European Economic and Social Committee, Brussels
Historical Archives of the European Parliament, Luxembourg
Historical Archives of the Council of Europe, Strasbourg
Historical Archives of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris
Historical Archives of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization,
Paris
Historical Archives of the International Telecommunication Union, Geneva
b)
Archives of national governments
Italian Central Archive of State, Rome
Historical Archives of the Italian Chamber of Deputies, Rome
Historical Archives of the Italian Senate, Rome
British National Archives, London
Archives of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Paris
c)
Archives of non-governmental organizations
Historical Archives of the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam
Historical Archives of the Antonio Gramsci Foundation Institute, Rome
Historical Archives of the Bettino Craxi Foundation, Rome
Historical Archives of the Luigi Sturzo Institute, Rome
Historical Archives of the Ugo Spirito Foundation, Rome
Historical Archives of the Luigi Einaudi Foundation, Rome
Historical Archives of the Giovanni Goria Foundation, Rome
Historical Archives of the Italian Catholic Action, Rome
Historical Archives of the Giovanni Spadolini Foundation, Florence
“The 1968” Archive, Florence
TEACHING ACTIVITY
a) Courses
1-5/2011 The European Union
Institute of International Studies at Palazzo Rucellai in Florence
8-12/2010 The European Union
Institute of International Studies at Palazzo Rucellai in Florence
3/2007 History of the European integration process
European Master in Social Enterprise and Local e-Governance, Faculty of Political Science of
the University of Pisa
237
b) Seminars
18/5/2011-8/6/2011 Conflicts of ideas, internal policies and external policies in the European
integration process
Course of History of the European Integration Process, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
18-26/5/2011 FAO, ILO, WHO and UNESCO: the big Specialized Agencies of the United
Nations in the history of the 20th century
Course of History of the International Organization, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
9-10/5/2011 The European Communities from The Hague Summit (1969) to the Stuttgart
European Council (1983): the phase two of the European integration process
Course of History of the European Integration Process, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
5-12/4/2011 Origins, development and consequences of the European “1968”
Course of History of Europe, Faculty of Political Science of the University of Padua
10-12/2/2011 History of the European Welfare State
Course of Contemporary History, Faculty of Sciences of Education of the Salesian Pontifical
University of Rome
22/4/2010-12/5/2010 FAO, ILO, WHO and UNESCO: the big Specialized Agencies of the
United Nations in the history of the 20th century
Course of History of the International Organization, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
19-20/10/2009 The American counter-culture in the 1960s and the Reaganomics in the 1980s:
impact on European economy, society, politics and culture
Course of History of International Relations, Faculty of Political Science of the University of
Pisa
c) Lectures
11/5/2011 The European Communities from the Second Détente to the end of the Cold War
Course of History of International Relations, Faculty of Political Science of the University of
Padua
29/3/2011 The Shoah in the context of the total war
International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2011, High School “Antonio Gramsci – John
Maynard Keynes”, Prato
3/3/2011 The Shoah and the Anglo-American Allies
International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2011, High School “Tito Sarrocchi”, Siena
3/2/2011 The Shoah and the Anglo-American Allies
International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2011, High School “Francesco Redi”, Arezzo
22/2/2010 The Shoah in the context of the total war
International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2010, High School “Antonio Gramsci – John
Maynard Keynes”, Prato
8/2/2010 The Shoah and the Anglo-American Allies
International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2010, High School “Francesco Redi”, Arezzo
238
6/2/2010 War to terrorism
Agora for students 2010, High School “Niccolò Copernico”, Prato
11/6/2009 Protest movements and international relations in the 1960s and 1970s
Course of Diplomatic History, Faculty of Political Science of the University of Padua
12/5/2009 The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the New
World Information and Communication Order
Course of History of the International Organization, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
24/11/2008 History of the EU education policy
Course of History of the European Integration Process, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
6/5/2008 The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the New
World Information and Communication Order
Course of History of the International Organisation, Faculty of Political Science of the
University of Padua
27/3/2008 Interpretations of the Italian “1968”
Course of History of International Relations, Faculty of Political Science of the University of
Calabria
20/11/2007 Values and policies in the United States and in the European Union after 11
September: a comparison
Course of History of International Relations, Faculty of Political Science of the University of
Pisa
14/4/2007 War and information from the decolonisation wars to the current wars
International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2007, High School “Francesco Petrarca”, Arezzo
29/11/2006 The global information war,1976-2006
Course of History of International Relations, Faculty of Political Science of the University of
Pisa
PARTICIPATION IN CONFERENCES
2-4/12/2010 The European Communities and the New World Information and Communication
Order (1976-1985)
Paper presented together with Maria Elena Spagnolo at the international conference «The
United Nations and European construction in a historical perspective», University of Padua,
Padua
22-23/10/2010 A European viewpoint on news: past, present and future of EuroNews
Paper presented at the workshop «Mass Media in Europe. Europe in Mass Media», University
of Trento, Trento
1-3/7/2010 Post-Colonial Europe: the European and Mediterranean identity in a changing
cultural climate
Paper presented together with Giuliano Garavini at the international conference «The
Mediterranean and Southern Europe: crisis and transformation from Détente to the Second
Cold War», University of Padua, Padua
239
25/6/2010 The intercultural dialogue in the Mediterranean area. The cultural issue from the
Euro-Mediterranean Partnership to the Union for the Mediterranean (1995-2010)
Paper presented at the international conference «La construction d’un espace euroméditerranéen. Genèses, mythes et perspectives (The establishment of a Euro-Mediterranean
area: genesis, myths and perspectives)», Panthéon Center, Paris
10-11/6/2010 The Liaison Committee of the Rectors’ Conferences of the Member States of the
European Communities in the European integration process: an overview
Paper presented at the international conference «European integration history in debate: the
interplay between national, supranational and transnational actors and institutions», European
University Institute, Florence
5-6/5/2010 The consensus crisis and the political need to evaluate public attitudes towards
European integration: causes and origins of the Eurobarometer Surveys (1968-1974)
Paper presented at the international conference «The evolution of the consensus to European
integration 1950-2005», University of Genoa, Genoa
21/2/2010-5/3/2010 The New International Information and Communication Order: flows of
information and communication between East and West and between North and South
(Individual Work); Communist propaganda through communication during the Hungarian
Revolution and the Prague Spring in Bulgaria, Hungary and Italy (Group Work)
Papers presented at the intensive programme/winter school «Cold War and Society»,
University of Vienna, Vienna
28-30/5/2009 The influence of the European protest movements on the European integration
process: an original interpretation of the 1972 Paris Summit
Paper presented at the international conference «Europe in the international arena during the
1970s: entering a different world», University of Padua, Padua
27-28/2/2009 The other Cold War. The North-South clash on a new international order in the
sectors of information and communication, 1970-1980
Paper presented at the international conference «The transformation of the international
system in the 1970s», University of Bologna, Bologna
27/11/2008 I sindacati europei, la crisi economica e il profilarsi di un “nuovo ordine
educativo” (European trade unions, the economic crisis and the “New Educational Order”)
Paper presented at the conference «Sindacati, imprenditori e la fine della “Golden Age”
(Trade unions, entrepreneurs and the end of the “Golden Age”)», University of Teramo,
Teramo
12-13/6/2008 “Occorre offrire uno sbocco idealistico all’ansia di rinnovamento dei giovani”.
La Democrazia Cristiana e la nascita di una politica europea per la gioventù, 1969-1972
(The Italian Christian Democrats and the birth of a EC youth policy, 1969-1972)
Paper presented at the conference «Aldo Moro e le relazioni internazionali dell’Italia (Aldo
Moro and Italy’s international relations)», University of Salento, Lecce
15-17/5/2008 The Italian Delegation
Paper presented at the international conference «Congress of Europe (1948-2008)»,
University of Paris I Panthèon-Sorbonne and House of Europe, Paris
9-10/3/2007 L’isolamento creativo. Ragioni, carattere, esiti del contributo italiano allo
sviluppo di una dimensione educativa comunitaria (The creative loneliness: reasons,
characteristics, results of the Italian contribution to the EC education policy)
240
Paper presented at the conference «L’Italia e la dimensione sociale nell’integrazione europea
(Italy and sthe ocial dimension in the European integration process)», University of Perugia,
Perugia
7-10/12/2006 The identity dilemma: educational autarchy or educational cooperation for
preserving political legitimacy and cultural sovereignty? The French case, 1968-1992
Paper presented at the international conference «The road to a united Europe: interpretations
of the process of European integration», University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen
22-25/11/2006 European protest movements, European integration process: mutual influences
in a historical perspective (1968-1969)
Paper presented at the international conference «Tracing protest movements: perspectives
from sociology, political sciences, and media studies», University of Halle, Halle
20-22/11/2006 European Union education policy in a historical perspective. Towards a
European model? (1976-2006)
Paper presented at the international conference «The transformation of higher education:
international influences», University of Boulogne-sur-Mer, Boulogne-sur-Mer
12/5/2006 Between the search for a new identity and the construction of a single market. The
European University Institute in the Community education policy, 1969-1971
Paper presented at the international conference «The origins of the European University
Institute», European University Institute, Florence
25-26/11/2005 When, how and why the mere vocational training became inadequate. The
origins of the Community educational policy, 1969-1974
Paper presented at the international conference «Vocational education and training and
Cedefop in the European integration», University of Padua, Padua
27-29/10/2005 Building a European cultural and educational model: another face of the
integration process, 1969-1974
Paper presented at the international conference «Beyond the customs union. The European
Community’s quest for completion, deepening and enlargement, 1969-1975», University of
Groningen, Groningen
19-21/10/2005 Towards a European educational model. The Community educational policy in
a historical perspective, 1968-1992
Paper presented at the international conference «Europe’s challenges. From the European
social space to the social Europe», University of Salamanca, Salamanca
22-23/4/2005 La nascita dell’Europa dell’educazione (The origins of the Europe of
education)
Paper presented at the conference «L’Europa negli anni ’70: un momento di svolta nella storia
del continente (The 1970s: a turning point in the history of Europe)», University of Padua,
Padua
18-19/6/2004 L’Italia e le politiche comunitarie per l’educazione (Italy and the EC education
policies)
Paper presented at the conference «L’Italia e la costruzione europea: nuove prospettive di
ricerca (Italy and the European integration process: new perspectives of research», University
of Padua, Padua
10-11/10/2003 Le politiche comunitarie in materia di educazione (EC education policies)
241
Paper presented at the international conference «Lo spazio sociale europeo (The European
social space)», Cisl Center, Florence
PUBLICATIONS
a)
Monographs
1.
Il sogno di Erasmo. La questione educativa nel processo di integrazione europea
(The Erasmus’ Dream. The educational issue in the European integration process), Milano,
FrancoAngeli, 2010
b) Essays in volumes
1.
Anathema or Model? The German Montanmitbestimmung in the Italian debate over
industrial democracy, in Karl Lauschke, edited by, «60 years of European Coal and Steel
Community, 60 years of codetermination», (2012)
2.
(together with Maria Elena Spagnolo) The European Communities and the New World
Information and Communication Order (1976-1985), in «Proceedings of the international
conference “The United Nations and European construction in a historical perspective”,
Padua, 2-4/12/2010», (2012)
3.
Intercultural dialogue in the Mediterranean region. The cultural issue from the EuroMediterranean Partnership to the Union for the Mediterranean, in «Proceedings of the
international conference “La construction d’un espace euro-méditerranéen. Genèses, mythes
et perspectives (The establishment of a Euro-Mediterranean area: genesis, myths and
perspectives)”, Paris, 25/6/2010», (2011)
4.
The origins of the Eurobarometer Surveys (1968-1974), in «Proceedings of the
international conference “The Evolution of the consensus to European integration 19502005”, Genoa, 5-6/5/2010», (2011)
5.
The other Cold War. The North-South clash on a new international order in the
sectors of information and communication, 1970-1980, in «Proceedings of the international
conference “The transformation of the international system in the 1970s”, Bologna, 2728/2/2009», (2011)
6.
Aldo Moro e la nascita di una politica europea della gioventù (Aldo Moro and the
birth of the European youth policy), in «Proceedings of the conference “Aldo Moro e le
Relazioni Internazionali dell’Italia (Aldo Moro and Italy’s international relations)”, Lecce, 1213/6/2008», (2011)
7.
Pratomigranti.it: quanto è conosciuto, come viene giudicato (Website
Pratomigranti.it. How many people know it? What do they think about it?), in
«L’immigrazione nella provincia di Prato: VII Rapporto Anno 2010 (Immigration in Prato,
2010)», (2011)
8.
Come trovare la cultura cercando la sicurezza. La dimensione sociale, culturale e
umana nel Partenariato euromediterraneo (Social, cultural and human dimension in the
Euro-Mediterranean Partnership), in Francesco Anghelone, edited by, «La politica
mediterranea dell’Unione europea (The EU Mediterranean Policy)», Roma, Editrice Apes,
(2011), pp. 145-231
9.
The Influence of Protest Movements on the European Integration Process: an
Interpretation of the 1972 Paris Summit, in Antonio Varsori, Guia Migani, edited by, «Europe
in the International Arena during the 1970s. Entering a different world/L’Europe sur la scène
internationale dans les années 1970s. A la découverte d’un nouveau monde», Bruxelles, Peter
Lang, 2011, pp. 253-277
10.
Il sindacato europeo, la crisi economica e il nuovo ordine educativo (European trade
unions, the economic crisis and the “New Educational Order”), in Ilaria Del Biondo, Lorenzo
Mechi, Francesco Petrini, edited by, «Fra mercato comune e globalizzazione: le forze sociali
europee e la fine dell’età dell’oro (Between the Common Market and globalization: European
social forces and the end of the Golden Age)», Milano, FrancoAngeli, 2010, pp. 151-178
242
11.
Between sovereignty dilemmas and cultural strategies. France and the birth of the
Community education policy, 1968-1974, in Morten Rasmussen, Ann-Christina Knudsen,
edited by, «The road to a united Europe. Interpretations of the process of European
integration», Bruxelles – Berne – Berlin - Frankfurt am Main - New York – Oxford - Wien,
Peter Lang, 2009, pp. 319-333
12.
The Italian Delegation to the Hague «Congress of Europe», in Jean-Michel Guieu,
Christophe Le Dréau, edited by, «Le Congrès de l’Europe à La Haye (1948-2008)», Bruxelles
– Berne – Berlin - Frankfurt am Main - New York – Oxford - Wien, Peter Lang, 2009, pp.
211-222
13.
Giovani migranti a Prato (Young Immigrants in Prato), in Fabio Bracci, edited by,
«L’immigrazione nella provincia di Prato: VI Rapporto Anno 2008. Più stabili ma più incerti:
giovani, donne e comunità migranti a Prato (Immigration in Prato, 2008)», Prato, Tipografia
La Moderna, 2009, pp. 145-192
14.
L’isolamento creativo. Ragioni, caratteri, esiti del contributo italiano allo sviluppo di
una dimensione educativa comunitaria, 1961-1975 (The creative loneliness: reasons,
characteristics, results of the Italian contribution to a Community education dimension,
(1961-1975), in Luciano Tosi, edited by, «L’Italia e la dimensione sociale nell’integrazione
europea (Italy and the social dimension in the European integration process)», Padova,
Cedam, 2008, pp. 199-232
15.
Building a European cultural and educational model: another face of the integration
process, 1969-1974, in Jan van der Harst, edited by, «Beyond the customs union: the
European Community’s quest for deepening, widening and completion, 1969-1975»,
Brussels, Bruylant, 2007, pp. 251-273
16.
La nascita di una dimensione educativa comunitaria. Tra interessi nazionali e istanze
di movimento, 1969-1976 (The origins of a Community education dimension: between
national interests and protest movements’ requests, 1969-1976), in Antonio Varsori, edited by,
«Alle origini del presente. L’Europa occidentale nella crisi degli anni Settanta (The origins of
the present. Western Europe in the 1970s)», Milano, FrancoAngeli, 2006, pp. 251-273
17.
La forza di due debolezze. Il ruolo del Parlamento europeo nella nascita di una
politica comunitaria dell’istruzione, 1957-1976 (The strength of two weaknesses. The
European Parliament’s contribution to the Community education policy, 1957-1976), in
Antonio Varsori, edited by, «Sfide del mercato e identità europea. Le politiche di educazione e
formazione professionale nell’Europa comunitaria (Market struggles and European identity:
educational and vocational training in the European Union)», Milano, FrancoAngeli, 2006,
pp. 11-52
18.
La politica comunitaria in materia di istruzione nel corso degli anni sessanta (The
Community education policy during the 1960s), in Laura Leonardi, Antonio Varsori, edited
by, «Lo spazio sociale europeo. Atti del convegno internazionale di studi, Fiesole, 10-11
ottobre 2003 (The European social space. Proceedings of the international conference,
Fiesole, 10-11 October 2003)», Firenze, Firenze University Press, 2005, pp. 57-75
19.
Formazione e ricerca: la storia e il futuro (Training and research: past and future),
in Luciano Barca, Maurizio Franzini, edited by, «Legittimare l’Europa. Diritti sociali e
crescita economica (Legitimizing Europe: social rights and economic growth)», Bologna, Il
Mulino, 2005, pp. 307-329
c) Essays in magazines
1.
The long path to a European television channel: democracy, broadcasting and
European unification at the time of the communications satellites, (1976-1986), in
«Zeitgeschichte», N. 4, 2011, pp. 251-264
2.
The Italian Communist Party, L’Unità and the Hungarian events, in Gergana
Georgieva/Gábor Faragó/Valentine Lomellini/Simone Paoli, Language and politics in the
Communist world: Bulgaria, Hungary and Italy as study cases between 1956
and 1968, in
«Zeitgeschichte», N. 6, 2010, pp. 380-396
243
3.
La geografia mentale del Sessantotto italiano (The mental geography of the Italian
“1968”), in «Annali della Fondazione Ugo La Malfa», Vol. XXII, 2007, , pp. 73-96
4.
Alle radici della politica educativa europea, 1968-1974 (The origin of the European
education policy, 1968-1974), in «Ventunesimo Secolo», N. 9, 2006, pp. 199-228
5.
La costruzione di una politica europea dell’istruzione. Il ruolo dell’Italia, 19571976 (The Italian contribution to the Community education policy, 1957-1976), in «Annali
della Fondazione Ugo La Malfa», Volume XIX, 2004, pp. 187-220
d) Essays in web magazines
1.
Unione Europea-Sadc: due strade che rischiano di divaricarsi (The European
Union and the Southern African Development Community: a lack of dialogue), in
«www.equilibri.net», 20/6/2005
2.
UE: quali politiche per quante Afriche dopo la creazione dell’Unione Africana (The
European Union: relations with the African Union), in «www.equilibri.net», 28/4/2005
3.
UE: rilancio nei rapporti con l’Asean tra grandi speranze e premature delusioni
(The European Union: relations with the Association of South-East Asian Nations between
great expectations and early disappointments) in «www.equilibri.net», 25/2/2005
4.
UE: crisi nei rapporti col Mercosur (The European Union: crisis in the relations
with
the Southern Common Market), in «www.equilibri.net», 21/12/2004
e)
Entries in reference works
Congresso dell’Europa dell’Aja (The Hague «Congress of Europe»), in Piero
Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by, «Dizionario dell’integrazione
europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
2.
Bombassei Giorgio, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello,
edited by, «Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)»,
Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
3.
Brittan Leon, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
4.
Brown Gordon, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
5.
Dixon Pierson, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
6.
Douglas Alec Home, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello,
edited by, «Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)»,
Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
7.
Kinnock Neil, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
8.
Lee Frank, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
9.
Maudling Reginald, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello,
edited by, «Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)»,
Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
10.
Monti Mario, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
1.
244
O’Neill Con, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
12.
Roll Eric, in Piero Craveri, Umberto Morelli, Gaetano Quagliariello, edited by,
«Dizionario dell’integrazione europea (Dictionary of the European integration)», Soveria
Mannelli, Rubbettino, (2011)
13.
La Grande Guerra, la rivoluzione e la guerra civile in Russia (The Great War, the
revolution and the civil war in Russia), in «Atlante Storico Treccani (Historical Atlas
Treccani)», Roma, Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana, 2007, pp. 92-107
14.
Regimi dittatoriali e crisi economica in Occidente, “rivoluzione dall’alto” in
Unione Sovietica (Dictatorial regimes, economic crisis in the West and the Stalinism), in
«Atlante Storico Treccani (Historical Atlas Treccani)», Roma, Istituto della Enciclopedia
Italiana, 2007, pp. 126-139
11.
f)
Reviews
Andrea Bosco, Federal Union e l’Unione franco-britannica. Il dibattito federalista
nel Regno Unito dal Patto di Monaco al crollo della Francia (1938-1940), Bologna, Il
Mulino, 2009, in «Relations Internationales», (2011)
2.
Lorenzo Medici, Dalla propaganda alla cooperazione. La diplomazia culturale
italiana nel secondo dopoguerra (1944-1950), Padova, Cedam, 2009, in «Rivista della
Società Italiana per lo Studio della Storia Contemporanea “Il Mestiere di Storico”», N. II/2,
2010, p. 231
3.
Laura Scichilone, L’Europa e la sfida ecologica. Storia della politica ambientale
europea (1969-1998), Bologna, Il Mulino, 2008, in «Rivista della Società Italiana per lo
Studio della Storia Contemporanea “Il Mestiere di Storico”», N. I/2, 2009, p. 253
4.
Giuliana Laschi e Mario Telò, a cura di, Europa potenza civile o entità in declino?
Contributi a una nuova stagione multidisciplinare degli studi europei, Bologna, Il Mulino,
2007, in «Journal of European Integration History», N. 2, 2008, pp. 186-189
5.
Cinzia Rognoni Vercelli, Luciano Bolis dall’Italia all’Europa, Bologna, Il Mulino,
2007, in «Annali della Società Italiana per lo Studio della Storia Contemporanea “Il Mestiere
di Storico”», Annale IX, 2008, p. 461
6.
Andrea Sangiovanni, Tute blu. La parabola operaia nell’Italia repubblicana, Roma,
Donzelli, 2006, in «Annali della Fondazione Ugo La Malfa», Vol. XXI, 2006, pp. 279-286
1.
LANGUAGE SKILLS
Language
Listening
Reading
Spoken
interaction
Spoken
production
Writing
ITALIAN
English
French
C2
C1
C2
C1
C2
A1
C2
A1
C2
A1
Dichiaro che le informazioni riportate nel presente Curriculum Vitae sono esatte e veritiere.
Autorizzo il trattamento dei miei dati personali ai sensi e per gli effetti del decreto legge
196/2003.
245
Franco Pisani architetto
via del casone 3r, 50124 FIRENZE
tel +390552286196 mob+393355220660 e.mail: [email protected] website: www.qart.it
education
1997 degree in architecture in the Facoltà di Architettura dell’Università degli Studi di
Firenze (110/110 e lode con dignità di pubblicazione).
1997 licensed architect, Ordine degli architetti di Firenze e Prato (number 5283).
teaching experiences
- 2004 to present The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Architecture Program, (PRARP)
firenze:
teacher of ARCH477 architecture in context
guest lecturer & visiting critic in the advanced architecture studio
- 2010 designing emptiness. a masterplan for the urban re-qualification of lazzeretto.
coordinator and curator of the urban design workshop.
- 2010 roger williams university SAAHP, thesis studio final presentations guest
critic, spring '10 session.
- 2009 bruno zevi foundation, università di roma la sapienza, for a frugal approach
in architecture, international design workshop, tutor.
- 2009 roger williams university SAAHP, bristol RI, visiting critic, ARCH 513
graduate architecture design studio
- 2008 fasten belts. strategies and proposals for the retraining of the outer belt of cerreto
guidi. coordinator and curator of the urban design workshop.
- 2008 to present kent state university, school of architecture, florence campus,
guest critic for the graduate and advanced architecture design studio
- 2007>2008 syracuse university, florence architecture program
teacher of ARCH397 architecture design studio for pre-arch students (summer
07, fall 08)
- 2005 universita degli studi di parma, facoltà di architettura
guest lecturer & visiting professor in the Materiali e progettazione di elementi
costruttivi course
- 2005>2006 syracuse university, florence architecture program guest lecturer and
visiting critic for the M.ARCH2
- 1999 to present Lorenzo de'Medici/The Art Institute of Florence/Atelier, firenze:
teacher of various courses in the interior design and architecture department
- 2002>1998 Università degli studi di Ferrara, Facoltà di Architettura:
aca+pe collaboration as teaching assistant in the courses architettura e composizione
architettonica+progettazione esecutiva held by prof. Luca Emanueli and prof. Vittorio
Anselmi in the facoltà di architettura of the ferrara university.
research experiences
- 2010 acces_SOS, is an international container of events and instruments for the
investigation and the evaluation of the nature of public space and its level of
accessibility
to
every
category
of
users
and
inhabitants.
http://accessos01.blogspot.com/
- 2007 the map of accessibility for the territory of bagno a ripoli
- 2002 to present research “il superamento del disagio abitativo” for the city of
Bolzano.
- 2001 la carta della progettazione interculturale, member of the international
workshop portofranco, organized by the Regione Toscana
- 1996 to 2003 Fondazione Giovanni Michelucci, fiesole.
Founded in 1982, the F.G.M. promote studies and research in the field of urbanism
and architecture, focusing in particular on themes linked to social habitat and to the
relationship between space and society.
246
professional experiences
- 1994 to present qart progetti (2000 to present as associated architect)
main works: sassi turchini: center for accessible holidays @ isola d’elba
(construction), theatre in Olbia with Giovanni Michelucci (built), progetto di recupero
urbano ERP in via Pisana for the city of Firenze (built), aree residenziali attrezzate
per Sinti e Rom for the city of Empoli and Prato (research and buildings),
bed&breakfast for Symposium Quattro stagioni in Cartoceto (project), NEGOZIO
CLASSICA concept and first shop in London UK (built), gymnasium for the city of
Golfo Aranci (built), EXCESS fashion & underground in the’80, installation design
(realised)
- 1994>2000 collaboration with various architects in Florence
- 1996 Soprintendenza ai Beni Artistici Storici Firenze, Prato e Pistoia
collaboration in the setting up of art exhibitions
recently published work
- 2010 shantywrap, in http://www.os-house.org/pages/os-house/home
- 2010 una scuola a legna, in “la scuola e la città”, serie I quaderni della Nuova Citta,
Edizioni Polistampa.
- 2005 renzino for welcome, in BOX dicembre 2005
- 2004 excess: moda e underground negli anni ottanta; in interni n°540 aprile 2004
- 2003 1000 € par m2:italie,florence,qart progetti,in: l’architecture d’aujourd’hui,marchapril 2003
- 2000 giovanni michelucci e qart progetti il complesso teatrale di olbia Edizioni
Polistampa, Firenze
awards and grants
- 2009 modena quartieri sud urban design competition, III prize
- 2008 vicchio la nuova scuola don milani design competion for a middle school IV
prize
- 2007 lipomo design competition for a didactic complex, lipomo, CO, IV prize
- 2006 progettare per tutti design competition for accessibility, milano, winner
- 2005 art box design competition, cork, IE, selectioned work
- 2005 welcome international design competion, milano, selectioned work
- 2004 gondola museum architectural competition, venezia, IV prize
- 2004 biennale di venezia, METAMORPH:IX mostra internazionale
dell’architettura excess: moda e underground negli anni ottanta installation selected
to be shown in the “notizie dall’interno” section
- 1999 IV guido de masi award scholarship award for the research: autocostruzione
ed autorecupero: for a social culture of habitat
247
PIERPAOLO RAPANÀ
data di nascita: 10.07.1978
luogo di nascita: Lecce
residenza: Via De' Cimatori 50121 Firenze
cell. +39 335 645 0316
e-mail: [email protected]
FORMAZIONE
Istruzione scolastica:
 Laurea in Architettura il 9.11.2007 presso l’Università degli Studi di Firenze con il
punteggio di 110 e lode su 110

A.A. 2004/2005
progetto Erasmus presso la Universidade Lusofona de Humanidades e Tecnologias,
Lisbona.

Luglio 1997
Diploma di maturità scientifica.
Corsi di formazione, Didattica, Stage e Workshops:
2009 - in corso
DOTTORATO DI RICERCA UNIVERSITA’ DEGLI STUDI DI FIRENZE
Progettazione Architettonica e Urbana Oggetto di ricerca: Sostenibilità: tradizione e
innovazione
2007 - 2011
CULTORE DELLA MATERIA
UNIVERSITA’ DEGLI STUDI DI FIRENZE Progettazione Architettonica e Urbana
2008 - 2011
GUEST CRITIC
ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY Architecture Studio (Florence Programme)
2010
WSB – WORKSHOP
Con Arch. Martin Haas (Behnisch Architekten) e Ing. Helmut Meyer (Transsolar)
“Green” Educational building In Scandicci (FI)
2009
WMC – WORKSHOP
Con Mario Cucinella
Sustainable Urban Planning
2008
WBA – WORKSHOP
Con Arch. Martin Haas (Behnisch Architekten) e Ing. Thomas Auer (Transsolar)
Sustainable Urban Planning in Novoli (FI)
Aprile - Maggio 2003
Stage in Allestimento Museale presso lo Spazio Espositivo di Santa Verdiana (SESV).
Con prof. Arch. Gianni Pettena, prof. Marco Brizzi.
248
Nell’ambito dello stage è stato progettato e realizzato l’allestimento della mostra
“Spaced Out”.
Conoscenze informatiche:

Ottima conoscenza delle piattaforme Windows e Mac. Conoscenza professionale delle
seguenti applicazioni cad e modellazione: ; Graphisoft ArchiCad; Maxon
Cinema4D/VRay; Autodesk Autocad ; Graphisoft ArtLantis; Adobe Photoshop; Adobe
Illustrator; Adobe Indesign. Buona conoscenza: pacchetto Office e software di
management (Webcollab, ecc.). Discreta conoscenza di vari applicativi di photo e video
editing.
Conoscenze linguistiche:
ITALIAN
LINGUA MADRE
INGLESE
Letto ECCELLENTE (CEFR: C1)
Scritto B1
Parlato C1
PORTUGUESE
Letto BUONO (CEFR: B1)
Scritto A1
Parlato A2
ESPERIENZE PROFESSIONALI
10.2011>in corso
Studio 10
www.studio10.it
Principali compiti e responsabilità:
Project Manager – Interior Designer
5.2011>10.2011
Baumschlager-Eberle GmbH
www.baumschlager-eberle.com
Principali compiti e responsabilità:
Project Manager Junior. Concorsi internazionali e sviluppo progetti fino alla fase
definitiva.
2007>2010
ARX Srl
www.arxnet.net
Principali compiti e responsabilità:
Project Leader. Le mie competenze vanno dall’elaborazione di concept di progetto alla
redazione di progetti definitivi e relazioni tecniche, passando per renderings e
presentazioni in ambito di conferenze e workshop. Ho collaborato alla redazione di
progetti esecutivi e piani particolareggiati, con proficue interazioni con committenti e
impiantisti, imprese e amministrazioni locali.
2007>2011
Assistente didattico al corso di Laboratorio di Progettazione dell’architettura 2 tenuto
dal Prof. Paolo Di Nardo presso L’università degli studi di Firenze
249
Dal Maggio 2006
Collaborazione ai progetti dello studio ARX dell’arch. Paolo Di Nardo in qualità di
progettista e operatore cad. Presso lo stesso studio coordino il laboratorio “A18” che si
occupa di attività di ricerca su materiali innovativi con particolare attenzione a due
temi: “applicazioni innovative di materiali tradizionali” e “trasparenza e qualità
percettive della pelle architettonica, il nuovo ruolo dell’involucro edilizio e la frontiera
dell’architettura reattiva”.
Dal Maggio 2004
Redattore della rivista AND – rivista di architetture, città e architetti.
2002>2004
Collaborazione presso lo studio di architettura dell’arch. Francesco Carpi Lapi.
Esposizioni ed Allestimenti:
2008
Sky, architetture del cielo. Lisa Reinermann espone le proprie opere (spazio A18, via
degli artisti 18/r, dal 08.02.08 al 30.04.08). Allestimento con arch. Paolo Di Nardo.
2004
BEYOND MEDIA, festival internazionale di architettura in video (Firenze, Ospedale
degli Innocenti – Salone Brunelleschiano, Stazione Leopolda – Spazio Alcatraz, 2-12
ottobre 2003). Allestimento. Con arch. Omar Cotza e arch. Fabrizio De Santis
2003
SPACED OUT. Allestimento presso lo Spazio Espositivo di Santa Verdiana (SESV 1630 Maggio 2003). Con arch. Gianluca Milesi, arch. Omar Cotza e arch. Fabrizio De
Santis.
2003
IL RILIEVO PER IL PROGETTO. Esposizione a cura di prof. arch. Stefano Bertocci,
prof. arch. Paola Puma, prof. arch. Giorgio Verdiani con Francesco Buffi e Daniele
Secco.
Esposizione del rilievo con relativi elaborati grafici di Palazzo Fargna in Città della
Pieve.
Con Serena Morosi e Giacomo Bernardini
(Città della Pieve - Palazzo della Corgna, 29 marzo- 05 aprile 2003)
2002
FIRENZE CITTA' SICURA, Gli effetti del pericolo e della paura sulla forma e sull'uso
della città. Mostra a cura di prof. arch. Leonardo Chiesi e prof. arch. Milena Caradonna
Allestimento ed elaborazioni grafiche. Con arch. Francesco Carpi Lapi (Firenze, Palazzo
Vecchio - Salone de' Dugento, 17-18 maggio 2002)
2000
GIF. Clip Video 60”. Proiezione alla 7° Biennale di Architettura di Venezia,
nell’ambito del concorso La Città del Terzo Millennio. Più etica, meno estetica (Venezia,
Arsenale).
250
Alessandro Raveggi
Curriculum Vitae
Personal details
Date of birth: 06/02/1980
Current Address:
Via C. di Belgioioso, 9C
50026 San Casciano - Firenze, Italy
contact: [email protected] - [email protected]
home: (+39) 055 8242326 – mobile: (+39) 3389471410
website: http://independent.academia.edu/alessandroraveggi
Present
Instructor - Intermediate Italian – Spring Semester 2012 - The International Studies Institute
- The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai - Via della Vigna Nuova, 18 - 50123 FIRENZE Tel.: +39055-2645910 Fax: +39-055-2646721 - web: www.palazzorucellai.org
Education
Jan 2005 – May 2008
Ph.D. in Aesthetics and Ethics, specialization: Literary Aesthetics
and Theory of Reading, Faculty of Literature and Philosophy, University of Bologna (Italy) –
supervisor: Professor Carlo Gentili [email protected] - Thesis: “Reception and Fiction: a
Theory or Reading between Structure and Aesthetic Response”.
Sept 1999 – June 2004
BA/Master in Aesthetics, specialization: Modern Literature and
Postmodernism, Faculty of Literature and Philosophy, University of Florence (Italy) –
supervisor Professor Sergio Givone [email protected] - Thesis: “Narcisolalia. An Approach to
Literary Postmodernism” - Laurea summa cum laude, thesis with distinctions.
Past positions
Aug 2009 – July 2011
Post-doctoral Researcher in Italian Studies, Department of Italian,
College for Modern Literatures, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México – mentor:
Professor Mariapia Lamberti Lavazza, coordinator of the “Italo Calvino” Special Chair for
Italian Studies. [email protected] - Research in Italian Studies on Italo Calvino and
his cultural experience of the Americas.
Sept 2011 – Oct 2011
Artistic curator, “Canale 150. 150 protagonisti di oggi raccontano
150 protagonisti dell'Italia di ieri”, Florence, 15th November 2011, 15 writers, curators,
musicians, actors of contemporary Italian culture talk about 15 leading persons of the history
of Italian nation, Le Murate, Florence. For Associazione Toolbox di Torino, in collaboration
with Comitato 150, Telecom Italia and Fondazione CRT. http://www.canale150.it
251
August 2011 – Oct 2011
Teacher, Italian Language and Culture, “Centro
Machiavelli”, recognized by MIUR/Regione Toscana (DGR 5879 - 10/12/2008 cod. FI 0509)
http://centromachiavelli.it
May 2011 – June 2011
Lecturer, Seminar on Modern Italian Travel-literature, “Una
cultura in viaggio. La letteratura di viaggio dell’Italia moderna, da Guido Gozzano a Pier
Paolo Pasolini”, Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Mexico City, in collaboration with the
Department
of
Italian
Studies,
Colegio
de
Letras
Modernas,
UNAM.
http://on.fb.me/unaculturainviaggio
Oct 2009 – June 2010
Lecturer, Seminar on Contemporary Italian Literature, “Dallo
Spaghetti Pulp alla New Epic. Gli ultimi anni della letteratura italiana”, Istituto Italiano di
Cultura, Mexico City, in collaboration with the Department of Italian Studies, Colegio de
Letras Modernas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. A programme about some
relevant novels and trends from the 90s until nowadays, as an introduction to authors such as
Tiziano Scarpa, Aldo Nove, Valerio Evangelisti, Antonio Moresco, but also Tabucchi,
Calvino’s Lezioni americane, Wu Ming ’s New Italian Epic.
http://dalpulpallanewepic.wordpress.com/
Jan 2009 – Dic 2011
Editor, “Novevolt, a collection of short Italian narrative”, Zona
publishing, Arezzo 2010. With books by Enzo Fileno Carabba, Alessio Arena, Franz
Krauspenhaar, Fabrizio Venerandi, Andrea Tarabbia, Jacopo Nacci. http://novevolt.it
Jan 2009 – Sept 2010
Artistic Director, “ULTRA, Festival of Literature”, Teatro della
Pergola, Biblioteca delle Oblate, Palagio di Parte Guelfa, in collaboration with Firenze Estate.
http://novevolt.wordpress.com/ultra
June 2008 – Feb 2009
Teacher, Italian Language and Culture, “Accademia Riaci”,
Academy of Art and Design, Via de’ Conti, 4 – Firenze.
Jan 2008 – June 2008
Teacher, Italian Language, School of Italian “Scuola D. M.
Toscana” – Via dei Benci, 23 – Firenze – recognized by MIUR (Italian Minister of Education,
University and Research)
June 2006 – Jan 2008
Editor and copywriter, E-ducation S.r.l. Scala Group – publishing
services for Regione Toscana, Corriere della Sera, Scala Group, Mondadori-Planeta, Passigli
Editore – http://www.e-ducation.it
Sept 2001 – June 2002
P.R. and assistant, Teatro Studio di Scandicci, Firenze - Istituzione
Scandicci Cultura – http://www.scandiccicultura.it
Academic specialization
XX-Century Italian Literature and Culture, Italian Studies, Comparative Literature, Aesthetics
and Literature, Cultural Studies, Travel-literature, Postmodernism and Avant-garde theory.
252
Previous academic research
For my BA/Master degree in Literary Aesthetics, supervised by Professor Sergio Givone
at the Università di Firenze, I studied the connection between post-modern literature, from
Latin-American and North-American (Cortazar, Pynchon, Barthelme, Fuentes, Paz) to Italian
writers (Calvino and Eco), and exponents of post-modern philosophy and culture (Derrida,
Lyotard, Hassan, Foucault). I explored the concepts of subjectivity, difference, and
literariness, also in relation to the arts and architecture, focusing on the passage from the
modernism to postmodernism, using a scheme offered by the myth of Narcissus and Echo.
My thesis was entitled “Narcisolalia. An approach to literary postmodernism”, published in
part in 2005, for Il Melangolo publish house.
In my PhD, supervised by Professor Carlo Gentili at the Università di Bologna, I developed a
growing interest in the effects and “margins” of literary discourse in the definition of a
literary anthropology. I studied reader-response theory, focusing primarily on Jauss, Iser,
Proust, Sartre, Eco and Genette, combining a structural method with literary hermeneutics.
With constant reference to philological analysis, during these years, I edited a comparative
review that covered Italian, Spanish and American literature, «Re: viste sulla letteratura e le
arti» (Zona, 2005-2007), for the Università di Firenze.
Some developments on cultural relativism and the “margins” of literature have prompted a
transition in the focus of my work, from a theory of reading to a theory of otherness and travel
experience, more centred in Modern Italian Literature, especially in travel-literature, novels
and essays around the theme of national identity. This transition has been allowed by my twoyear post-doctoral research in Italian Studies at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México (UNAM), mentored by Professor Mariapia Lamberti Lavazza, “Italo Calvino”
Special Chair for Italian Studies. I wrote a monograph on Italo Calvino and his cultural
experience of America and Mexico, Calvino Americano, forthcoming in 2012 for the Italian
publisher Le Lettere. My recent work on Calvino is a reflection on his writings about travel,
tourism and the encounter with America’s alterity. More importantly, it pushes for a reevaluation of the relation between the author and the concepts of Italian identity and traveling
cultures, encouraging also a comparison with other writers such as Pasolini, Levi, Gozzano
and Manganelli and an Italian bibliography on travel-literature.
I am currently interested in the eternal youth myth, “juvenilization” and Puer aeternus in the
Italian Modern prose from Collodi to Moravia, but also in the intersections, affinities and
encounters between Italian and Latin-American literature from the 1970s until our days.
Publications
Forthcoming
-, Calvino americano, Le Lettere, Firenze, Spring 2012 [monograph] ISBN 9788860875464;
-, “American Otherness and Italian Traveling-Culture in Italo Calvino”, in Peter Carravetta
(ed.), The Theatre of the Mind, The Stage of History: Italian legacies between Europe, the
Mediterranean, and North America on the 150th Anniversary of Unification. A Festschrift in
honour of Mario Mignone Stony Brook University, NY, Spring 2012;
- “Transmutazioni e transculturazioni: Appunti per un’Orestiade africana, un adattamento
post-coloniale in Pier Paolo Pasolini”, AA.VV., Shaping and Identity: Adapting, Rewriting
and Remaking Italian Identity, Legas Publishing, Ottawa CA, Spring 2012;
253
- “Il saggio-in-viaggio: il giro più lungo dell’etnografia in Calvino, Levi e Pasolini”, in Anna
Dolfi (ed.), La saggistica degli scrittori, Bulzoni, Roma, Spring 2012;
Articles, chapters in books and editions
- “Si una noche de invierno un viajero conquistara las Americas... Italo Calvino y la
exploración de la alteridad mexicana”, Mariapia Lamberti e Fernando Ibarra (eds.), Italia y
los italianos: lengua, literatura e historia. UNAM, México, October 2011. ISBN:
607022677-1;
- “C’è un’opera in questa classe? Rilevanza dell’esperienza estetica della lettura”, in S.
Bertolini, R. Formisano (eds.), Filosofia, Estetica ed Etica: otto percorsi di ricerca, Aracne,
Roma, May 2009; ISBN 9788854823082.
- (editor) Novevolt, books series of novellas, Editrice Zona, Arezzo, 2009-2011:
Published books: Dreadlock! by Jacopo Nacci - ISBN 978 88 6438 238 8 - Marialuce by
Andrea Tarabbia - ISBN 978 88 6438 205 0 - Il mio cuore è un mandarino acerbo di Alessio
Arena - ISBN 978 88 6438 129 9 - L’ultima avventura del Signor Buonaventura di Fabrizio
Venerandi - ISBN 978 88 6438 128 2 - Il molosso, la leggenda del cane di Enzo Fileno
Carabba - ISBN 978 88 6438 071 1 - Un viaggio con Francis Bacon di Franz Krauspenhaar ISBN 978 88 6438 072 8
- “Il guanto del dottor White. Il teatro, la poesia e il loro pubblico”, «L’Ulisse. Rivista di
poesie, arti e scritture», 10, April 2008, Lietocolle, Rome; ISSN: 1973-2740
- (editor, with Tommaso Lisa), «Re: viste sulla letteratura e le arti», 3, “Poetiche della
Precarietà”, 3, literary review between American, Latin-American and Italian Studies,
Zona/Università di Firenze, Arezzo, May 2007. ISBN 9788889702376.
- “Das Fiktive und Das Imaginäre. Risposta estetica e oggetto artistico in Wolfgang Iser”, in
F. Desideri, G. Matteucci (eds.), Dall’oggetto estetico all’oggetto artistico, Florence
University Press, Firenze, June 2006; ISBN 8884533872
- (translator and editor) R. Federman, “Surfinzione: la narrativa oggi e domani” in Giulio
Mozzi (ed.), Best Off 2006. il meglio delle riviste del 2005, minimum fax, Rome, January
2006; ISBN 8875210780.
- “Pestilenziario. Brevi storie per un'arte cartografica” (reflections on Jean Paul’s Seebuch –
In Italian), «Re: viste sulla letteratura e le arti», 2, Zona/Università di Firenze, Arezzo,
February 2006, edited by Tommaso Lisa and Alessandro Raveggi - ISBN 88 89702 23 0.
- (editor, with Tommaso Lisa); «Re: viste sulla letteratura e le arti», 2, “Litware. L’ennesima
potenzialità della letteratura”, 2, literary review between American, Latin-American and
Italian Studies, Zona/Università di Firenze, Arezzo, February 2006 - ISBN 88 89702 23 0;
- “Narcisolalia. Un approccio al postmodernismo letterario”, «Estetica», il Melangolo,
Genova, July 2005 - ISBN 9788870185560;
- (editor, with Tommaso Lisa), «Re: viste sulla letteratura e le arti», “Oltre lo Zero”, 1, literary
review between American, Latin-American and Italian Studies, Zona/Università di Firenze,
Arezzo, February 2005 - ISBN 9788887578898;
Miscellaneous articles
- “In giro per Città del Messico”, «Il Reportage», 8, October 2011, Rome, ISSN 2037-3791;
254
- “La gabbia aperta. Identità e novità latinoamericana. Una conversazione con Roger Bartra”
«Alfabeta2», 10, June 2011, edited by A. Cortellessa, A. Inglese, N. Balestrini, U. Eco;
- “Lo spirito (messicano) è un osso. Fenomenologia e frenologia di una cultura violenta”,
«Alfabeta2», 6, February 2011, edited by A. Cortellessa, A. Inglese, N. Balestrini;
- “Per la mia gente parlerà lo spirito. Una cronaca messicana”, «Alfabeta2», 4, November
2010, edited by A. Cortellessa, A. Inglese, N. Balestrini, U. Eco;
- “La grazia, o il tedio a morte di vivere in provincia” (on contemporary Italian literature),
«Alfabeta2», 2, September 2010, edited by A. Cortellessa, A. Inglese, N. Balestrini, U. Eco;
- Series “Apologhi e Apolidi”, «Alfabeta2», July 2010, on-line one-month column on the
experience of literary travel and cultural difference, edited by A. Cortellessa, A. Inglese, N.
Balestrini. Divided in four issues: I (“Per la mia gente parlerà lo spirito”), II (Giungle d'asfalto
letterarie), III (“Paesi novamente retrovati”), IV (Nazionalità cosmiche, nazionalismo
cosmetici);
- “Non multa sed multum: qualità della vita e qualità letteraria”, «Carmilla» and
«Minima&moralia. Online review of minimum fax publisher», October 2009, on-line article
on Literature and Italian social condition;
Conferences and talks
12/07/2011
“Gingio/Giannettino. Formazione e deformazione tra Gombrowicz e Collodi” in IV Seminario
Internazionale sul Romanzo, International meeting, Università di Trento, directed by
Professor Massimo Rizzante.
http://www.unitn.it/files/download/19065/locandinasiriv2011.pdf
11/15/2011
“Italo Calvino (come fosse) italiano”, public lecture in “Canale 150 a Firenze – 15
protagonisti di oggi raccontano 15 protagonisti dell'Italia di ieri”, Associazione Toolbox in
collaboration with Comitato 150, Telecom and Fondazione CRT, curator: Gianluigi
Ricuperati, Le Murate, Firenze.
05/07/2011
“Transmutazioni e transculturazioni: Appunti per un’Orestiade africana, un adattamento postcoloniale in Pier Paolo Pasolini.” for the Conference “Shaping an Identity: Adapting,
Rewriting and Remaking Italian Literature”, 6-7 May 2011 at the University of Toronto.
03/19/2011
“American Otherness and Italian Traveling-Culture in Italo Calvino” - Third Forum In Italian
American Criticism (FIAC) “The theatre of the mind, the stage of history - Italian legacies
between Europe, the Mediterranean, and North America on the 150th Anniversary of
Unification.” A Festschrift in honor of Mario Mignone on his 70th birthday - Stony Brook
University, march 18-19.
05/20/2010
“Incontro con Antonio Moresco”, a talk with Italian novelist Antonio Moresco and students
from the course on Contemporary Italian Literature “Dallo Spaghetti Pulp alla New Epic”,
Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Mexico City.
255
11/12/2009
(moderator), panel “Italian Philosophy of Reinassaince and Baroque”, IX Jornadas
Internacionales de Estudios Italianos de la Cátedra Italo Calvino – Facultada de Filosofía y
Letras – Colegio de Letras Modernas – Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
11/09/2009
“Si una noche de invierno un viajero conquistara las Américas: Italo Calvino y la experiencia
de la alteridad mexicana” (in Spanish) – IX Jornadas Internacionales de Estudios Italianos de
la Cátedra Italo Calvino – Facultada de Filosofía y Letras – Colegio de Letras Modernas –
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
06/12/2006
“Das Fiktive und Das Imaginäre. Risposta estetica ed oggetto artistico in Wolfgang Iser” (in
Italian) - Conference «Dall'oggetto estetico all'oggetto artistico», may 2006, Centro per l'arte
contemporanea Luigi Pecci di Prato, in collaboration l’Università di Firenze, il Laboratorio di
Filosofia della Facoltà di Scienza della Formazione, la Società Filosofica Italiana, La
Biblioteca Filosofica – Sezione di Firenze, patrocinio della Società Italiana di Estetica.
03/16/2006
“Che cosa fa la letteratura? Ricezione e finzione tra Genette, Sartre e Jauss”, (In Italian)
Semiario di Estetica, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Departamento de Filosofía; organized
by Sergio Givone and Gianluca Garelli;
06/12/2005
Speaker, relation on edited review “Re: viste sulla letteratura e le arti”, in conference “Le
riviste letterarie tra tradizione e contemporaneità”, T!LT - Festival Nuove Letterature de
Torino, Osservatorio Letterario Comune di Torino, Italia;
01/12/2005
Speaker, “La Fine del Post-moderno? Critica e poetiche tra Stati Uniti ed Europa
dall’Avanguardia al Post-moderno”, Department of Italian Studies, University of Florence.
Other speakers: Peter Carravetta (City University of New York), Remo Ceserani, Mario
Domenichelli, Gabriele Frasca, Romano Luperini, Gaetano Prampolini.
Conferences, panels and festivals organized
September, from 18 to 25, 2010
Organizer and Director of ULTRA, Festival of Literature, Biblioteca delle Oblate, Palagio di
Parte Guelfa, Firenze Estate. Invited authors: George Saunders, Elisa Biagini, Paolo Maccari,
Rosaria Lo Russo, Vito M. Bonito, Marco Giovenale, Francesco Pacifico, Andrea Raos,
Francesca Matteoni, among others.
September, from 23 to 26, 2009
Organizer and Director of ULTRA, Festival of Literature, Florence. Teatro della Pergola,
Comune di Firenze, Biblioteca delle Oblate. Invited authors: Antonio Moresco, Enzo Fileno
Carabba, Giorgio Vasta, Mariagrazia Calandrone, Gabriele Frasca, Sergio Nelli, Filippo
Tuena, among others.
October, from 28 to 30, 2008
Organizer, festival-tribute to David Foster Wallace: “Caro Vecchio Neon. Per David Foster
Wallace”, Florence – different places (clubs, bookshops).
2006-2007
Organizer, festival of young Italian theatre “ZOOM festival – immagine del nuovo teatro” in
collaboration with Compagnia Teatrale Krypton and Gogmagog, Ministry of Cultural
256
Heritage and Activities (MiBac), Regione Toscana, Comune di Firenze and Scandicci, Firenze
dei Teatri.
January 12, 2005
Organizer, conference “La Fine del Post-moderno? Critica e poetiche tra Stati Uniti ed Europa
dall’Avanguardia al Post-moderno”, Department of Italian Studies, University of Florence.
Speakers: Peter Carravetta, Remo Ceserani, Mario Domenichelli, Gabriele Frasca, Alessandro
Raveggi, Romano Luperini, Gaetano Prampolini.
Languages
ITALIAN - native language
ENGLISH - fluent
SPANISH - C2, maximum level, Instituto Cervantes D.E.L.E. (International Certificate of
Spanish as a Foreigner Language, 2008.)
LATIN - reading knowledge
References
Professor Mariapia Lamberti Lavazza
(post-doctoral supervisor)
Coordinación de Letras Italianas,
Colegio de Letras Modernas,
Catedra Extraordinaria “Italo Calvino”
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
e-mail: [email protected]
Professor Peter Carravetta
(supervisor on my works on postmodernism and travel-literature)
Alfonse M. D’Amato Chair
Italian and Italian American Studies
Department of European Languages and Literatures
Stony Brook University, NY
e-mail: [email protected]
Professor Mario Barenghi
(supervisor on a monograph on Italo Calvino)
Dipartimento di Scienze Umane per la Formazione “Riccardo Massa”
Facoltà di Scienze della Formazione
Università di Milano Bicocca
email: [email protected]
Professor Sergio Givone
(BA/MA supervisor)
Università di Firenze
Dipartimento di Filosofia
Via Bolognese 52
50139 Firenze, Italia
Tel. 0039-055-4622419
e-mail: [email protected]
Professor Paolo Valesio
Giuseppe Ungaretti Professor of Italian Literature
513 Hamilton Hall
1130 Amsterdam Avenue, Mail Code: 2827
257
Columbia University, New York , NY 10027
telefono: +1 212-854-0747 - fax: +1 212-854-5306
email: [email protected]
Professor Carlo Gentili
(Ph.D. tutor)
Università di Bologna
Dipartimento di Filosofia
Via Zamboni, 38
40126 Bologna
Tel: +39 051 20 9 8338
e-mail: [email protected]
web: www.unibo.it/docenti/carlo.gentili
Publications in Fiction and Poetry (selection)
- La trasfigurazione degli animali in bestie, (poetry) Transeuropa, Massa, March 2011,
including Spanish translation by Montserrat Mira and an introduction by Rosaria Lo Russo;
ISBN 978-8875801205
- “III. Tlazolteotl”, (poetry) «Versodove», 15, September 2010, ISBN 978-8865980019
- “La strategia dei nostri oggetti paterni”, (narrative) in «Nuova Prosa», 53-54, September
2010; ISBN: ISSN 0394-5340
- “Corazón Potëmkin”, (narrative), in «Carmilla», online literary magazine edited by V.
Evangelisti, G. Genna and Wu Ming, July 2010;
- “Il grande regno dell’emergenza”, (narrative) in «Nazione Indiana», online literary
magazine, June 2010;
- “Huitzilopochtli”, (poetry), in «Poesia», March 2010, with an introduction by Mariagrazia
Calandrone;
- “La risolutezza”, (narrative) in VV.AA., Rien ne va plus, ed. Enrico Piscitelli, Las Vegas
edizioni, March 2009; ISBN 9788895744087.
- “Habeas corpus”, (poetry), in «il verri», June 2009; ISBN:
- Disney contro le Metafisiche, (poetry), Zona, Arezzo, October 2008; ISBN 978 88 95514 65
9
- “Manifestazioni esteriori di un supposto stato interiore”, (narrative), in VV.AA., Sotto la
lente. Antologia di scrittori fiorentini, Ed. Perrone, Rome, April 2008.
- “Vs.”, (poetry, e-book), editor: Biagio Cepollaro, (http://www.cepollaro.it), November 2006.
- “Imbiss”, (poetry), in «Semicerchio. Rivista internazionale di letteratura comparata»”,
Università di Siena, XXXV, November 2006; ISBN:
- L’evoluzione del Capitano Moizo, (poetry), Zona, Arezzo, January 2006; ISBN
9788889702062
- “Le vie del tabacco sono infinite” (narrative), in VV.AA., Il sapore del fumo, Ed. Effequ,
Orbetello (Grosseto), March 2005; ISBN:
258
- A party, a song for Leo/Doppelgänger, (narrative), Titivillus, S. Miniato (Pisa), May 2003.
ISBN 9788872180792
- (translator), “Selezione da El Mapa de America e i Dintorni”, (poetry), «Re: viste sulla
letteratura e le arti», 2, Zona/University of Florence, Arezzo, February 2006;
- “Protrarti. Self-portraits”, (poetry, with photos by Sandra Isacson), «Re: viste sulla
letteratura e le arti», 1, Zona/University of Florence, Arezzo, February 2005;
- (translator), R. Sukenick, “Gli Uccelli”, «Re: viste sulla letteratura e le arti», 1,
Zona/University of Florence, Arezzo, February 2005;
- “Calderon Fatal”, (poetry), in VV.AA., La parola poetica per un’architettura dell’anima.
Poeti. Città. Europa, Edizioni della Meridiana, Florence, October 2004; ISBN 8887478880.
- “Poesie 2001-2003”, (poetry), in VV.AA., Nodo Sottile 3, Crocetti, Milan, November 2002;
ISBN 9788883060861.
- (editor), VV.AA., L’Apparecchio di Junior. 43 poeti contro la guerra, Zona, Arezzo,
November 2002; ISBN 8887578524.
Memberships
American Association for Italian Studies, Modern Language Association, Italian Association
for Scholars in Aesthetics (A.I.S.E.) 2005-2007, European Society for Aesthetics.
contacts
Dr. Alessandro Raveggi, Ph.D.
(+39)3389471410 - (+39)0558242326
e-mail: [email protected]
skype: alessandro.raveggi
259
Catia Santi
Date and Place of Birth: June 30th 1969 ; Florence – Italy
Citizenship: Italian
Address: Via L.B.Alberti 41
50013- Campi Bisenzio - Firenze I T A L Y
Home: +39 055 8951416
Mobile: +39 329 5615317 – +39 334 1978686
E-mail: [email protected]
Education
Degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures (German and English), University of Firenze,
1996. Specialization in “European Linguistic”. Grade: 110/110 and laudem.
March – June 2006
Relevant Courses
Course Advanced “ALIAS” teaching italian – Univertà Ca’
Foscari di Venezia
March – May 2001
Master in Comunication – Private Institute
METAUNIVERSITY – Roma.
January – June 1998
POST-GRADUATE course in “Language &
Comunication” – University of Firenze – Linguistic
Department.
From March to April 1993
Training course on “Teaching Italian as a second
language” at Koinè School - Firenze.
January 2011
Certificates
Member of A.I.L.A. (Accademia Italiana di Linguistica Applicata).
June 1992
First Certificate in English – University of Cambridge.
Teaching experience in Italy to English mother-tongue students
September 2010 – October 2011
January 2003 – April 2010
September – December 2011
January – May 2007
Taught Italian language classes beginners for James
Madison University in British Institute of Florence.
Taught Italian language classes at all levels from beginner
to intermediate for the University of Minnesota for CAPA
organization in Florence.
Taught Italian language classes (beginners) for Palazzo
Rucellai - Florence.
December 2005 - January 2006
December 2006 - January 2007
December 2008 – January 2009
Taught Italian language intermediate and advanced classes
for the Monash University of Australia in Prato.
August 1997 – May 1998
Taught Italian language classes at the Lorenzo de’ Medici
Institute – American universities in Florence.
260
Teaching experience
July 2010 – November 2010
Taught Italina language classes for intensive levels –
Michelangelo - Firenze.
July - December 2006
July – September 2008
Taught Italian language classes every level and Tutor for
american students – Linguaviva -Firenze.
June 1998 – Dicember 1999
March 2000 – June 2000
October 2002 – November 2002
Taught Italian language classes at intermediate/advanced
levels and cultural classes at Eurocentre – Firenze.
October 1996 – May 1999
Director of Studies for the center “Scambi culturali” –
Signa (part-time job).
Pubblications
May 2000
Article – “History of Linguistic” – FOCUS.
July 2004
“IdeaUno” – textbook of Italian language for foreign
students: communication & grammar- elementary.
Progetto Lingua – Firenze.
June 2005
“IdeaDue” – textbook of Italian language for foreign
students: communication & grammar – intermediate and
advanced. Progetto Lingua – Firenze.
261
Daniela Sinicropi
Architect
Via Luna 34, 50121, Florence
Phone : 055 676 200 (home); 338 523 1855 (mobile)
[email protected]
Place/Date of birth Hartford (CT), USA, 07/08/1980
Citizenship Italian/United States
Education and Training
January 2012 PhD Candidate, International PhD Program in
“Processes, Materials and Constructions in Civil and
Environmental Engineering and for the Protection of the
Historic-Monumental Heritage”, University of Florence,
Italy in collaboration with the University of
Braunschweig, Germany.
January 2009 Licensed Architect. University of Florence, 2008
qualifying examination. N° 7446 of the Professional
Association of Architects, Planners, Landscapers and
Conservers of the Province of Florence, Italy, Section A
March 2008 Degree in Architecture from the University of Florence
with first class honours (110/110, magna cum laude).
Thesis title: Experimental analysis on masonry arches
reinforced with SRP Subjected to Loads and Horizontal
Displacements. Thesis Supervisor: Prof. M. Paradiso;
Co-director: Prof. A. Borri.
June 1999 High school leaving certificate (diploma) from the “N.
Machiavelli” Classical Lyceum in Lucca, Italy.
Additional Education
and Training
From October 26, 2011 Participant in the continuing professional education
course “Corso per Membri di Commissioni Edilizie,
Paesaggistiche e Giudicatrici”, held at the Professional
Association of Architects of Florence in collaboration
with the Fondazione Centro Studi e Ricerche Professione
Architetto, Florence.
262
September 2011 Certificate for “Corso Internazionale di Perfezionamento
in
Museologia
e
Museografia”
(International
Specialization Course in Museology and Museum
Science), Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale, Florence.
February 2009 Certificate for “Coordinatore della sicurezza per la
progettazione e per l’esecuzione dei lavori” (Coordinator
for Safety in Project Design and Management), Scuola
Professionale Edile of Florence.
September 2008 CTEFL (Certified Teacher of English as a Foreign
Language with an additional study in Teaching Business
English) Via Lingua, Florence.
January 17-18, 2008 Participant in the Second Annual RELUIS (Rete dei
Laboratori Universitari di Ingegneria Sismica - Network
of University Seismic Engineering Laboratories)
Assembly, Florence.
October 17 – November 3 Cooperation Project with the city of Fez, Morocco,
2007 coordinated by the Foundation “Città di Ieri per l’Uomo
di Domani” (City of Yesterday for the Man of
Tomorrow), for the technical and specialized training of
technicians of ADER-FES in structural rehabilitation and
restoration. Fez, Morocco.
July 30 – August 3, 2006 Participant in the XVIth International Seminar and
Architectural and Urban Culture Award in Camerino,
Italy.
From 2006 Various Italian – English/English – Italian translations
for private clients.
Professional
Activities
From January 2012 Adjunct Faculty for the course Architecture in Italy:
History and Preservation at the International Studies
Institute, Via della Vigna Nuova 18, Florence
From December 2011 Project management for the restructuring of a flat in
Florence, Via Maroncelli, 27.
263
From December 2011 Safety Plan for The International Studies Institute, Corso
Tintori 27, Florence, together with Arch. Carlo Achilli.
April – May 2011 Project management for the restructuring of a flat in
Florence, Via Sacchetti, 4.
November 2010 Safety Plan for The International Studies Institute, Via
della Vigna Nuova, 18, Florence, together with Arch.
Simonetta Bracciali and Eng. Antonio Polli.
September 2010 Interior Design project for Studio Polli, Sesto Fiorentino,
Firenze.
From September 2010 Adjunct Faculty for the course Arch 416 - F1/F2
Advanced Architectural Design Studio: Urban for RWU
School of Architecture, Art & Historic Preservation at the
International Studies Institute, Via della Vigna Nuova 18,
Florence
October 2009 – January Project management for the redevelopment of a flat in
2010 Florence, Via della Rondinella 66/2.
November 2009 – Project management for the restructuring of a flat in
February 2010 Florence, Via Luna, 34.
April 2010 – September Freelance Architect for Studio Architettura Bracciali, Via
2011 del Casone 20, 50124 Florence.
May 2009 – April 2010 Freelance Architect for Studio Tecnico Associato Dei
1000, Viale Dei Mille 94, 50131 Florence.
May 2009 Participation in the project competition with DEA Group
for the requalification of the urban spaces in via Roma
adjacent the Church and for the design of the new Piazza
for the Town of Asigliano Veneto (VI).
March – May 2009 Freelance Architect for Monostudio, Polo Scientifico e
Tecnologico, Via M. Giuntini 63, 56023 Navacchio (PI);
Public Relations for Architectour.net.
264
January – June 2009 Instructor for the course of Statica e Stabilità delle
Costruzioni Murarie e Monumentali (Statics and Stability
of Masonry and Monumental Constructions) held by
Prof. M. Paradiso, University of Florence.
September - November Tutor in workshop “FASTEN BELTS. Strategies and
2008 proposals for the urban retraining of the outer belt of
Cerreto Guidi”, presented to the Town of Cerreto Guidi,
by The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai and Roger Williams
University.
September 3 - 26 Participation in the project competition “Premio
2005 Piranesi_DARC 2005”, for the creation of a museum
space in Villa Adriana (TV), Rome.
Publications Paradiso, M., Sinicropi, D. “Análisis experimental de
arcos de albañilería reforzados con SRP y sometidos a
cargas y desaplazamientos horizontales.” 8vo Simposio
Internacional de Estructuras, Geotecnia y Materiales de
Construcción, 2008, UCLV, Cuba.
Paradiso, M., Sinicropi, D. “Experimental Analysis on
Masonry Arches Reinforced with SRP and subjected to
Loads and Horizontal Displacements.” Libro de Actas,
IX Congreso Internacional di Rehabilitación del
Patrimonio arquitectónico y edificación, Sevilla, 2008,
Tomo I, pp 315-320.
Mother tongues Italian, English
Other Languages
Spanish B1 Level certification (Common European Framework of
Reference for Language) for Spanish, February 2008,
Centro Linguistico di Ateneo, University of Florence.
German B1 Level certification (Common European Framework of
Reference for Language) for German, June 2008, Centro
Linguistico di Ateneo, University of Florence.
Technical Skills and Experience in Laboratory work from June 2007 to March
Competences 2008. The competences acquired in this environment
265
include the organization of experimental work in a
laboratory, hand-making of formworks and mortar, brickcutting, load and traction tests on brick and mortar
samples, arch building and the use of various measuring
instruments.
Professional experience as a freelance architect since
February 2009, both in collaboration with other
professional firms and autonomously. The competences
acquired in this environment include project
management, technical drafting and preparation of
projects for various Town Panels, regularization
procedures and building permits.
Teaching experience in design subjects since September
2010. The competences acquired in this environment
were obtained during courses held for American
architecture students and include preparation of classes
and the organization of the course itself, with class trips
and visits to building sites.
Computer Skills
and
Competences Office package (Word, Excel, Power Point); Adobe
Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Premiere Pro;
AutoCad, CorelDraw, DOCET (energy certification),
YPOT, DOCFA.
References Prof. Arch. Michele Paradiso; [email protected]
Prof. Eng. Antonio Borri; [email protected]
Arch. Carlo Achilli; [email protected]
Arch. Franco Pisani; [email protected]
Maria Gemma Maggi; [email protected]
266
Christian Tarchi, PhD
Resident in via Mari, 5 – 50014 – Fiesole (FI) - Italy
Mobile Phone Number: (+39) 3383745579
Email: [email protected]
Born in Fiesole (FI, Italy) on the 30th of November, 1980
Education
2011
Department of Psychology (University of Florence)
Ph.D. in Educational Psychology
Dissertation:” Comprehending expository texts in the Knowledge Era:
Fostering the reading comprehension process of disciplinary-content
texts by activating and sharing prior knowledge”
2010
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education – University of Toronto
(Canada)
Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Knowledge Innovation and
Technology.
2008
Department of Psychology, University of Florence (Italy)
Specialization course in “Learning difficulties in children and
teenagers: diagnosis and intervention”
2007
Department of Psychology - University of Florence (Italy)
Training in Research in Educational Psychology
2006
Department of Psychiatry – University of Queensland (Australia)
Training in Research in Cross-cultural Psychology
2005
Informatics section applied to Psychotherapy – University of Ulm
(Germany)
Training in Research in Clinical Psychology
2004
Faculty of Psychology – University of Padua (Italy)
Degree in Psychology - Specialization in Developmental and
Educational Psychology (110/110 with honors)
1999
Liceo Scientifico Guido Castelnuovo – Florence (Italy)
Diploma in Scientific Studies
Academic Experience
2011
The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai – Florence (Italy)
Lecturer of Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 credits)
2011
The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai – Florence (Italy)
Lecturer of Cultural Literacy (1 credit)
2011
The Umbra Institute – Perugia (Italy)
Lecturer of Human Development in Culture
267
2011
Faculty of Political Sciences – University of Florence (Italy)
Lecturer of Developmental Psychology (9 credits)
2008-2011
Department of Psychology – University of Florence, Italy
Teaching Assistant in Educational Psychology
2008
Department of Psychology, University of Florence (Italy)
Tutor for the Specialization Course Learning disorders in children and
teenagers: diagnosis and intervention
Publications
Tarchi, C., Chuy, M., Donoahue, Z. & Stephenson, C. (in press). Introdurre gli
studenti al Knowledge Building ed al Knowledge Forum. Qwerty.
Chuy, M., Resendes, M., Tarchi, C., & Chen, B. (in press). Modi di contribuire ad un
dialogo per la ricerca di spiegazioni. Qwerty.
Chen, B., Resendes, M., Chuy, M. & Tarchi, C. (in press). Identificare, selezionare e
sviluppare idee promettenti nella Knowledge Building. Qwerty.
Tarchi, C. (in press). La comprensione del testo espositivo. L’interazione tra
conoscenze precedenti del lettore e contenuto del testo. Giornale Italiano di
Psicologia.
Bigozzi, L., Vezzani, C., Tarchi, C. & Fiorentini, C. (in press). The role of individual
writing in fostering scientific conceptualization. European Journal of Psychology
of Education, http://dx.doi.org.10.1007/s10212-010-0031-8.
Tarchi, C. (2010). Reading comprehension of informative texts in secondary school:
A focus on direct and indirect effects of reader's prior knowledge. Learning and
Individual Differences, 20 (5), 415-420.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2010.04.002.
Tarchi, C. (2010). Co-costruire il significato di un testo: verifica dell’efficacia di un
trattamento. Psicologia dell’Educazione, 4 (3).
Translations (IT-EN and EN-IT)
Borgogni, L., Petitta, L. & Barbaranelli, C. (2007). Test of Motivational orientation.
Firenze: Giunti O.S. Organizzazioni Speciali; Bucuresti: OS / D&D / Testcentral.
Caverni, S. & De Ponte-Conti, R. (2006). Edgar Levenson: Psicoanalisi
Contemporanea. Urbino: Edizioni QuattroVenti.
Comello, V. (2004). La terapia Control-Mastery come relazione di attaccamento
sicuro. Psicoterapia, 30.
Collaborations with Journals
Referee for Psicologia Clinica dello Sviluppo since 2010.
Presentations at Conferences and Workshops
Chuy, M., Tarchi, C., Resendes, M. & Chen, Bodong (2011). Knowledge Building in
Senior Kindergarten and Grade 1. Oral Communication at the 9th International
268
Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning. Hong Kong, July 4-8,
2011
Tarchi, C. (2011). Activating and sharing prior knowledge before reading an
expository text. Oral Communication at EARLI (European association of Research
on Learning and Instruction) 14th Biennial Conference “Education for a Global
Networked Society”. Exeter, United Kingdom, 30 August – 03 September 2011.
Chuy, M., Tarchi, C., Resendes, M. & Scardamalia, M. (2011). Ways of Contributing
to a Knowledge-Building Dialogue in Elementary Classrooms. Poster Presentation
at EARLI (European association of Research on Learning and Instruction) 14th
Biennial Conference “Education for a Global Networked Society”. Exeter, United
Kingdom, 30 August – 03 September 2011.
Tarchi, C. & Camilloni, M. (2011). Reading and drawing together: analyzing
processes of co-construction of meaning. Oral Communication at JURE (Junior
Researches of EARLI) Pre-Conference “Education for a Global Networked
Society”. Exeter, United Kingdom, 29-30 August 2011.
Tarchi, C. (2011). Attivare e condividere conoscenze precedenti per apprendere dal
testo espositivo. uno studio condotto con studenti di scuola secondaria di primo
livello. Oral Communication at Giunti Conference “In classe ho un bambino
che…”. Florence (Italy), 4/5 february, 2011.
Tarchi, C. & Pinto, G. & Camilloni, M. (2011). A più voci: costruire significati
attraverso l’interazione in classe. Oral Communication at AIP (Italian Association
of Psychology) Conference. Genova (Italy), 19-21 September, 2011.
Chuy, M., Tarchi, C., Scardamalia, M. & Donoahue, Z. (2011). Primi passi con il
Knowledge Building ed il Knowledge Forum in scuola primaria. Oral
Communication at Giunti Conference “In classe ho un bambino che…”. Florence
(Italy), 4/5 february, 2011.
Camilloni, M. & Tarchi, C. (2011). Disegnare insieme: valutare i processi di cocostruzione del significato. Oral Communication at Giunti Conference “In classe
ho un bambino che…”. Florence (Italy), 4/5 february, 2011.
Tarchi, C. (2010). Reading comprehension of informative texts in secondary school: a
focus on direct and indirect effects of reader’s prior knowledge. Oral
Communication at JURE (Junior Researches of EARLI) Conference “Connecting
diverse perspectives on learning and instruction, a conference of synergy”.
Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 19-22 luglio 2010.
Tarchi, C. & Camilloni, M. (2010). Comprendere un testo scritto e disegnare insieme:
valutare i processi di co-costruzione del significato. Oral Communication at III
Simposio sull' interazione fra pari nei processi d’apprendimento. Facoltà di Lettere
e Filosofia, Macerata, 28-30 ottobre 2010.
Piccinelli, F., Pezzica,S., Tarchi, C. & Bigozzi, L. (2010). Essere genitori di bambini
con ADHD: analisi del contenuto di un Parent Training. Oral Communication at
XIX Congresso nazionale AIRIPA (Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca e
l'Intervento nella Psicopatologia dell'Apprendimento) - I disturbi
dell'apprendimento - Ivrea, 15-16 Ottobre 2010
269
Bigozzi, L., Vezzani, C., Tarchi, C., & Fiorentini, C. (2010). The role of individual
writing in fostering scientific conceptualization. Poster presented at 12th
International Conference of the EARLI Special Interest Group on Writing University of Education at Heidelberg, Germany, 8/10 september 2010
Tarchi, C. (2010). La comprensione del testo scritto: valutare i processi di cocostruzione del significato. Poster presented at XXIII Congresso Nazionale della
sezione di Psicologia dello Sviluppo e dell’Educazione– Libera Università degli
Studi di Bolzano, Bressanone, 26/28 ottobre 2010
Tarchi, C. (2010). Eccesso, rischio, velocità: la parola ai ragazzi. Oral Communication
at Workshop ACI (Automobile Club Firenze) La percezione del rischio tra gli
adolescenti in un’ottica di ricerca ed acquisizione dell’autonomia emotiva –
Palazzo Bastogi, Sala delle Feste, Firenze, 07 maggio 2010.
Tarchi, C. (2009). Il Ruolo della Conoscenza Precedente nella Comprensione del
Testo Scritto. Oral Communication at XVIII Congresso Nazionale
dell’Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca e l’Intervento nella Psicopatologia
dell’Apprendimento (AIRIPA) - I disturbi dell'apprendimento. La Spezia, 23-24
ottobre 2009.
Tarchi, C. (2009). The socio-constructivist dimension of reading comprehension: a
focus on reader’s prior knowledge. Poster presented at JURE Conference
“Fostering Communities of Learners” – Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 24/25
agosto 2009.
Tarchi, C. (2009). La comprensione del testo informativo: analisi dei predittori e
dell’interazione tra le componenti in studenti di II media. Poster presented at AIP
Workshop – Sezione psicologia dello sviluppo e dell’educazione - La prevenzione:
un bene invisibile? Ricerca e interventi nei contesti di sviluppo. Università degli
Studi di Bari, 4/5 dicembre 2009.
Camilloni, M., & Tarchi, C. (2009). Global Curriculum Approach: valutazione
dell’efficacia negli apprendimenti di base. Poster presented at AIP Workshop –
Sezione psicologia dello sviluppo e dell’educazione - La prevenzione: un bene
invisibile? Ricerca e interventi nei contesti di sviluppo. Università degli Studi di
Bari, 4/5 dicembre 2009.
Tarchi, C. (2009). Come migliorare la comprensione del testo? Il peso delle
conoscenze precedenti del lettore. Poster presented at the Workshop “Lo psicologo
nella scuola: teoria, ricerca e intervento”. Facoltà di Psicologia, Università degli
Studi di Firenze, 13 novembre 2009.
Camilloni, M. & Tarchi, C. (2009). Metodi di valutazione delle capacità collaborative
e delle rappresentazioni dell’esperienza scolastica per studenti di scuola primaria.
Poster presented at the Workshop “Lo psicologo nella scuola: teoria, ricerca e
intervento”. Facoltà di Psicologia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 13 novembre
2009.
Tarchi, C. (2008). Insegnamento Reciproco ed Internalizzazione: uno studio condotto
con alunni di IV elementare. Poster presented at XVII National Conference of
Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca e l’Intervento nella Psicopatologia
dell’Apprendimento (AIRIPA) - I disturbi dell'apprendimento. Facoltà di Scienze
della Formazione, Università Cattolica di Piacenza, 17/18 ottobre 2008.
270
Tarchi, C. (2008). La classe come Comunità di Allievi: co-costruzione del significato
in alunni di IV elementare. Poster presented at VII National Conference of Società
Italiana di Psicologia di Comunità (SIPCO). Facoltà di Psicologia, Università
degli Studi di Firenze, 25/27 settembre 2008.
Tarchi, C. (2008). I Disturbi Specifici dell’Apprendimento (DSA) e le Difficoltà
dell’apprendimento scolastico. L’esperienza della difficoltà di apprendimento. Il
dialogo tra Scuola e Università nel campo dell’Apprendimento. Oral
Communication at the Workshop “Le Difficoltà di Apprendimento Scolastico:
l’importanza delle relazioni interpersonali”. Istituto Comprensivo Statale “Ernesto
Balducci”, Fiesole (FI), 05 settembre 2008.
Research Support
2009
Department of Psychology, University of Florence (Italy)
Project “The emergency of literacy”.
2008
Department of Psychology, University of Florence (Italy)
Project “Assessment of the Project “Senza Zaino”.
Enrollment in Registers and Associations
2010-today Member AIP (Italian Association Psychology) - Section of
Developmental end Educational Psychology).
2009-today
5241).
Enrolled in the register of the Roll of Psychologists in Tuscany (nr.
2009-today
Member JURE (Junior Researchers) of EARLI (European Association
of Research on Learning and Instruction).
Skills: Languages
2008-2009
Language Center of the University of Florence, Italy
Course of Spanish, level A1 and B1
2003-2004
Goethe Institut Inter Nationes – Florence, Italy
Certificates in German: Zertifikat Deutsch; Deutsch Zentrale
Mittelstufepruefung
2002
British Institute of Florence, Italy
First Certificate in English
271
Anatole Tchikine
Research Associate, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of Dublin,
Trinity College
Via Santa Reparata, 30, 50129, Florence, Italy
Tel: +39-333-7256611
E-mail: [email protected]
Education:
2004:
1997:
1990-1993:
Ph.D., University of Dublin, Trinity College, Department of History of Art
and Architecture (dissertation: “Francesco Camilliani and the Florentine
garden of Don Luigi di Toledo: a study of fountain production and
consumption in the third quarter of the 16th century”; advisor: Dr Peter
Cherry)
First Class Honors B.A., University of Dublin, Trinity College (History of
Art and Architecture and Philosophy)
B.A., Urals State University (Ekaterinburg, Russia), Department of History
(transferred to the University of Dublin)
Employment:
2010-:
2010-2011:
2005-2009:
2002-2005:
2001-2002:
2001:
Adjunct Professor, The International Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai,
Florence
Fellow in Garden and Landscape Studies, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library
and Collection (Trustees for Harvard University), Washington, DC
Visiting Lecturer, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Department of
History of Art and Architecture
Fellow, The Medici Archive Project, Florence
Visiting Lecturer, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Department of
History of Art and Architecture
Visiting Lecturer, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Department of
Russian
Publications:
Book:

“For life, pleasure, and everyday use”: water and fountains in Renaissance and
Baroque Italy (for the Penn Studies in Landscape Architecture; the proposal is
currently under review by the University of Pennsylvania Press).
Peer-reviewed articles:




“L’anima del giardino: water, gardens, and hydraulics in sixteenth-century Florence
and Naples,” Technology and the garden. Dumbarton Oaks Symposium on the
History of Landscape Architecture, edited by Michael Lee (Washington, DC:
Dumbarton Oaks, 2014) (forthcoming)
“Medicinal herbs and ‘marvels of nature’: gardens of simples in sixteenth-century
Medici Tuscany,” Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes, 32
(2012) (forthcoming)
“’When he becomes pope…’: the rise and fall of Don Luis de Toledo at the Medici
court (1545-1579),” The Medici and their Archive, edited by Alessio Assonitis and
Brian Sandberg (Rome: Viella, 2011) (in press)
“Galera, navicella, barcaccia? Bernini’s fountain in Piazza di Spagna revisited,”
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes, 31 (2011), 4 (in press)
272



“Horticultural differences: the Florentine garden of Don Luis de Toledo and the nuns
of S. Domenico del Maglio,” Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed
Landscapes, 30 (2010), 3, pp. 224-240
“Giochi d’acqua: water effects in Renaissance and Baroque Italy,” Studies in the
History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes, 30 (2010), 1, pp. 57-76
“The ‘candelabrum’ fountain reconsidered,” Studies in the History of Gardens &
Designed Landscapes, 29 (2009), 4, pp. 257-269
Other:

“Vera Mukhina (1889-1953), Russian/Soviet sculptor,” “Vladimir Tatlin (18851953), Model for Monument to the Third International (1919-20),” and “Niccolò
Tribolo (1500-1550), Italian sculptor,” The Encyclopedia of Sculpture, ed. Antonia
Boström, New York and London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2004, pp. 1128-1130, 16431644, 1682-1684
Selected conferences, symposia, and invited lectures:
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“’Oranges and lemons …’: troubles with the Giardino dei Semplici in eighteenthcentury Florence,” The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) annual conference,
Detroit, April 2012 (forthcoming)
“Gardens of mistaken identity: the Giardino delle Stalle in Florence and the Giardino
dell’Arsenale in Pisa,” The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) Conference,
Washington, DC, April 2012 (forthcoming)
“L’anima del giardino: water, gardens, and hydraulics in sixteenth-century Florence
and Naples,” Technology and the Garden, Dumbarton Oaks Symposium,
Washington, DC, May 2011
“The art of water: fountains in Renaissance and Baroque Italy,” public lecture,
Academy Art Museum, Easton, MD, April 2011
“Hidden retreats: green on the map of Renaissance Florence,” keynote address, Biannual Graduate Symposium in Art and Architectural History, University of Virginia,
Charlottesville, VA, March 2011
“Art, trade, and diplomacy: sixteenth-century Florentine fountains and commodities
and gifts,” The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) Conference, Venice, April
2010
“Florence and the rest of the world: ‘exotic’ gifts at the sixteenth-century Medici
court,” Cultural Exchange Conference, Dublin, November 2009
“Horticultural differences: the Florentine garden of Don Luis de Toledo and the nuns
of S. Domenico del Maglio,” Early Modern Gardens in Context Inaugural
Conference, Dublin, November 2009
“Natural magic and the science of waters: the unpublished treatise of a late sixteenthcentury Neapolitan fontaniere,” Society for Renaissance Studies (SRS) National
Conference, Dublin, July 2008
“Military motifs in Italian Renaissance and Baroque fountain design,” Cultures of
War Interdisciplinary Conference, Dublin, March 2008
Awards, grants, honors:
2010-2011:
2002-2005:
2001, 1997:
1999-2001:
1997-2000:
Dumbarton Oaks Fellowship in Garden and Landscape Studies (Trustees for
Harvard University), Washington, DC
The Medici Archive Project Fellowship, Florence
The Royal Hibernian Academy, Thomas Dammann Junior Memorial Trust
Travel Award
Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship
University of Dublin, Trinity College, Adam Loftus International Scholarship
273
1995-2000:
1995:
1994:
University of Dublin, Trinity College, Foundation Scholarship
University of Dublin, Trinity College, John Henry Bernard Prize in
Philosophy
University of Dublin, Trinity College, Anne Crookshank Prize in History of
Art
Courses taught:
The Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Florence (study abroad program for UConn, UVa,
PennState, ASU, and Roger Williams University students)
Undergraduate course:
 The Art of Florence (Spring, Summer 2010; Summer, Fall 2011)
Department of History of Art and Architecture, University of Dublin, Trinity College
Undergraduate courses:
 Painting and sculpture in the Italian Renaissance (academic year 2001-02; Fall 2005;
Spring 2008; Fall 2009)
 Art and society (academic year 2006-2007)
 Introduction to European painting (Fall 2005; Fall 2006; Fall 2007; Fall 2009:
segments on Italian Renaissance and Northern Renaissance art)
 Introduction to European architecture (Spring 2008)
 The Gothic Cathedral (Spring 2008; Fall 2009)
 Approaches to art history (Spring 2007; Fall 2008)
 The arts of Japan (Fall 2006: segments on 16th- and 17th-century Japanese art and
architecture)
TRIARC (Irish Art Research Centre), University of Dublin, Trinity College
Graduate seminars:
 Research and methodologies (Fall 2006; Spring 2007; Spring 2008; Fall 2008; Fall
2009: seminars on Iconology, Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Feminism, Semiotics,
Structuralism, and Deconstruction)
Department of Russian, University of Dublin, Trinity College
Undergraduate course:
 Art and architecture in Stalin’s Russia (Spring 2001)
Research interests:
Fountains and hydraulics in 13th- through 18th-century Italy
Urban gardens in 16th-century Florence: horticulture, collecting, and medicine
Sculpture and architecture at the 16th-century Medici court
Gifts in Renaissance and Baroque Europe
Languages:
Russian, English, Italian (reading, speaking, writing)
Spanish, French, Latin, German (reading)
Computer skills:
Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Access, Excel
Adobe Acrobat, Photoshop, Illustrator
274
References:
Professor John Dixon Hunt, Professor Emeritus and Editor, Studies in the History of Gardens
and Designed Landscapes, University of Pennsylvania, The Graduate School of Fine Arts,
Department of Landscape Architecture, 119, Meyerson Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311,
USA; e-mail: [email protected]
Professor John Beardsley, Director of Studies, Garden and Landscape Studies, Dumbarton
Oaks Research Library and Collection, 1703, 32nd Street NW, Washington, DC, 20007; tel:
202-339-6461, fax: 202-625-0432, e-mail: [email protected]
Dr Sarah Alyn Stacey, Director, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of
Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland; tel: +353-1-896-2686, e-mail:
[email protected]
275
Simon Young
Contact Details
Name: Simon Young
Address: Via Piana 54, Santa Brigida, Pontassieve (FI) 50065
Telephone: 055 8300399, 3284804195
Email: [email protected]
Qualifications
2003-2006
Istituto di Studi Umanistici di Firenze
Doctorate, Prolegomena to a Prosopography of the Western Exiles
given magna cum laude December 18th 2006
First in concorso
1992-1995
Clare College Cambridge
First cum laude in Part Two of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic Tripos.
Awarded Chadwick Prize for Celtic Studies and Green Prize ‘for
learning’.
First in Part One of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic Tripos
1990-1992
Huddersfield New College
5 A Levels at level A: English Literature, History, Politics, Ancient
Civilisation, General Studies.
2 S levels at level one: English and History.
New College Prize for best student in History, Politics and English
Literature.
1989-1990
Rosalind High School, Alberta, Canada
1984-1989
Calder High School
6 GCSEs at level A: English language, English literature, History,
Geography, Home Economics and French.
2 GCSEs at level B: Maths and Integrated Science
Work Experience
2010-
Lecturer at Palazzo Rucellai: Courses on History of Florence
2009-
Research Assistant at the European University Institute (Fiesole)
2009-
Lecturer at Umbra Institute in Perugia: Courses on Italian Food History
and the History and Politics of Modern Italy
2007-9
Television consultancy with TrueVision (London)
2006-
Lecturer at Fairfield University in Florence: Courses on Renaissance
Italy, the Second World War in Italy and the History of Christianity.
276
1999-
Freelance journalist in publications ranging from the Guardian to the
Spectator and from History Today to the Fortean Times. Book reviews
in the Sunday Telegraph and the Independent.
1998-1999
Teacher in the Irish Refugee Association. Teaching to large groups
several times every week. Help with special needs student.
1995-2002
English teaching in Ireland, Spain and Italy, both individually and to
classes
Academic Publications
2012
2011
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2005
Victorian FAQ: Victorian Florence (forthcoming)
‘Three Notes on West Yorkshire Fairies in the Nineteenth Century’
(forthcoming) Folklore
‘Fairy Impostors in Longford in the Great Famine’ (Forthcoming)
Studia Hibernica
‘Apocalypse Then, c. 410’, BBC History (March)
Celtic Revolution (Gibson Square, 2010 paperback). Sunday
Telegraph: ‘...a writer with the enviable ability to make even the
obscurest periods of history accessible and interesting...rare that such
evident learning is work with such lightness and sprezzatura...a
wonderfully written book’. Guardian: ‘Young wears his considerable
learning lightly – not many scholars can describe 2,000 years of
European history with authority – and his style is light, witty and
enjoyable’. Spectator: ‘Extrordinarily ambitious’. Times Literary
Supplement: ‘So good a book… up to date scholarship’. BBC History
Magazine: Diverting… refreshingly contentious’. CARN ‘This book is
just very interesting, very good and very entertaining’. Church Times:
‘Fascinating, well paced’. Western Mail: ‘Witty informative and
enthralling’. Fortean Times: ‘Lively, well-written’
‘Will the Real King Arthur Please Stand Up?’, BBC History (Dec),
15-21
Farewell Britannia (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2008 paperback).
Sunday Telegraph: ‘For imaginative and thrilling engagement with the
history of those often shadowy and chaotic times, Farwell Britannia
will be very hard to beat.’ Spectator: ‘…fiction as written by a careful
and formidably knowledgeable scholar, one who is concerned to
ground all that he writes in scrupously documented fact…a book that,
garlanded as it is, with a whle array of learned yet hugely entertaining
notes, serves as a work of much more than simply fiction.’
A.D. 500: A Journey Through the Dark Isles of Britain and Ireland
(Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2006 paperback). Financial Times:
‘Informative and entertaining, this is popular history at its best.’
Independent on Sunday: ‘What a joy to be able to recommend a book
about misery, bloodshed and grisly superstition for being funny,
compassionate and clear-eyed… The world is wonderfully evoked…
the hand behind these narrators guides them with warmth and fluency.’
277
2004
2003
2003
2003
2002
2002
2002
2002
2001
2001
2001
2001
2001
2000
1998
1998
1998
1997
1995
Ireland on Sunday: ‘Simon Young offers nugget after nugget of
fascinating detail… This bawdy picaresque and high-spirited book
wears its considerable learning lightly and opens a window on a time
long neglected.’
‘Et Iterum Post: Dislocation in St Patrick’s Confessio?’, Studi Celtici 2,
69-75
‘The Bishops of the Early Medieval Spanish Diocese of Britonia’,
Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 45, 1-19
‘A Briton in Twelfth-Century Santiago de Compostela’, Peritia 17-18,
507-8
‘In gentibus dispersti nos: the British Diaspora in Patrick and Gildas’,
Peritia 17-18, 505-6
‘On the Irish Peregrini in Italy’, Peritia 16, 250-55
‘Iberian Addenda to Fleuriot’s Toponymes’, Peritia 16, 479-80
‘St Patrick and Clovis’, Peritia 16, 478-9
‘Celtic Myths, Celtic History’, History Today 52, 20-24
Britonia: Camiños Novos [Galician](Toxosoutos translated into
Spanish in 2002)
‘St. Brigit in a Medieval Welsh Poem’, Peritia 15, 279
‘A note on St Patrick's Confessio: Gloria patris est’, Studia Celtica 35,
361-2
‘Britones in Thirteenth-century Galicia’, Studia Celtica 35, 361-2
‘The Forgotten Colony’, History Today 50, 5-6
Review of García y García, Bretoña in electronic journal Heroic Age 4,
‘Brigit of Kildare in early Medieval Tuscany’, Studia Hibernica 30,
251-55
‘Donatus Bishop of Fiesole 829-76, and the Cult of St Brigit in Italy’,
Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 35, 13-26
‘San Donato, un vescovo irlandese nella Fiesolo del secolo IX’,
Corrispondenza 32, 3-5
‘A Britto in Eighth-Century Tuscany’, Studia Celtica 3, 281-282
The Celtic Sources for the Arthurian Legend (Llanerch) with Jon Coe.
Talks and Congresses
2005Over fifty appearances on British radio from 2005 onwards
including Excess Baggage and Women’s Hour.
2006
Talk at the British Institute Florence on ‘the Irish Saints in Italy’.
2007
Lecture at Aberdeen Conference on Souter: ‘Was Pelagius British?’
Personal Details
Nationality: British
Date of Birth: 11th July 1973
Marital Status: Married with one daughter
Prizes: Runner up in the 2002 Premio Historia for Britonia (see publications)
Hobbies: Boar watching
Languages: English – native speaker; Italian – fluent; Spanish – fluent; Gallego –
intermediate; French – excellent reading; German – basic reading. I read in several
dead languages.
278

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