2_17_11 - The Villager Newspaper Online

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2_17_11 - The Villager Newspaper Online
Complimentary Copy “Celebrate the Power
of Community”
INSIDE
see page 3
Would you like to
Feed the Hungry?
Shelter the Homeless?
Care for the Sick?
see pages 8, 9 & 11
Volume 17 Issue 9
February 17 - 23, 2011
www.TheVillagerNewspaper.com
With God, all things are possible....
see February on the Shore pages 4 & 5 for details
Tuscan Taster Every Day
3 – 6 p.m. & 9 p.m. – Close
& During ALL Cavs Games!!
MENU AVAILABLE IN BAR ONLY
see February on the Shore pg 7 for details
Winter
Blast
Mark Pender of LaBamba and
the Hubcaps shows there’s
more to a winter blast than just
the weather. They put on a
great performance at Straight
from the Heart this past weekend. See coverage on pages 8
and 11.
A Christian Success Story: Stick to the Plan!
Can a Christian business leader walk the talk and still end up
on top?
Yes, says A. Ray Dalton, President of international medical
equipment supplier PartsSource in Aurora, Ohio.
If you stick to the plan – God’s plan – you can get ahead in
the world.
That is the story from Dalton, whose faith-based approach to
the corporate jungle has taken him from x-ray technician to top
spots in the medical equipment industry.
Continued on page 6
Turning Up the Heat....
Pastor Paul Endrei of Church on the Rise
Westlake with A. Ray Dalton, President of
PartsSource in Aurora.
The Rocky River High School Pirate Girls Dance
Team performed during halftime at the Rocky River
- Avon basketball game two weeks ago. See inside for photos of the big Rocky River win that kept
the Pirates on top in the West Shore Conference.
The Villager Newspaper
Find us on
Facebook
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Large Selection of Hearing Aids
FREE Hearing Tests & Consultation
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View Newspaper Pages Online • Photo Galleries
• Archives • Advertising Info
26915 Westwood Rd., Ste. A-7
Westlake, OH 44145
See Story on page 4
216-261-6681
www.avada.com
Page 2 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Meals on Wheels: A Great Community Service
Preparing over 60 meals a day for Bay
Village Meals on Wheels, Bradley Bay
Health Center provides a community service
that is much appreciated by residents they
serve.
“One lady I deliver to said that without
these meals, she would not be able to stay
in her home because she has a hard time
getting out to shop,” said volunteer Joie
Matousek. “That meant a lot to me and also
told me how much this service means to the
people we serve.”
It is indeed a comfort to know these cold
winter days that Bradley Bay Health Center
is busy each morning preparing two
delicious meals – lunch and dinner – that is
taken to the homes on the Bay Village Dept.
of Community Services list of deliveries.
Linda Evans, Dietary Manager, reports
Bradley Bay Health Center has been
providing this service for almost a decade.
Former Community Services Director Adele
Wheeler made the request. “John O’Neill
(owner of Bradley Bay) saw the need and
we have been doing it ever since,” said
Evans.
Meals go to the Knickerbocker
Apartments as well as individual homes
through town. The hot meals are prepared
in microwaveable containers for heating,
Celebration!
Francesa Gonzalez
and the lunches are delivered in
pleasant packages.
Francesa Gonzalez is one of the
dietary workers who last week
prepared tempting barb-e-que pork hot
meals with veggies and side dishes
while Joie put together lunch bags of
ham sandwiches and fruit.
It all looked great and underscores
a community commitment from
Bradley Bay Health Center that is
backed by an entire continuum of care
through the skilled nursing and
assisted living amenities that are a Bay
Village community landmark through
almost 50 years of service.
If you are interested in learning
about Meals on Wheels in Bay Village,
please call Shirley Hostetler, Meals on
Wheels coordinator, at 899-3442.
St. John Medical Center celebrated Black History Month with a terrific
diversity lunch this week that welcomed hospital staffers and guests to great
food, music and fun. “These lunches were started by our Environmental
Department a few years ago, and we thought it would be a great idea to make
it part of African American History Month,” said Sr. Kendra Bottoms. The pot
luck was also catered by Café 83 in North Ridgeville. SJMC hosts a continuing
program of diversity events through the year. Pictured are (from left) Heather
Hurd and Greg Foster of Café 83, Sr. Kendra Bottoms, Gwen Jones, SJMC
Environmental Services, SJMC, Dr. J. Howard Timmons, Sr. of Bethany Baptist
Church in Elyria, and LaSchelle Williams, SJMC Coordinator of Customer
Service.
Francesca
Gonzalez, Dietary
Manager Linda
Evans, and
Administrator
Candy Sanson of
Bradley Bay
Health Center
prepare upwards
of 60 meals a day
for Bay Village
residents through
Meals on Wheels
each day.
Jole Matousek
Spring
Children’s
Resale
Bay Village Early
Childhood PTA will hold
a Children’s Resale on
Saturday, March 12 from
8 a.m. to noon at Bay
Middle School, 27725
Wolf Road in Bay
Village. Admission will
be $5 from 8 to 9 a.m. for
early birds and $1 from 9
a.m. to noon. The sale will
feature gently used baby
items, children’s clothing,
toys and games, books,
and large items such as
strollers, cribs, and
outdoor play items.
Bay Village Early
Childhood PTA is a group
of parents with children
ages birth to six years old.
They are a network of
parents committed to
improving our community and schools for
our children. For more
information, visit website
bvecpta.org or email
[email protected]
Page 3 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Page 4 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Tried
and True…
It’s winter, and boy, it’s been a
tough one for all of us here in
northeast Ohio. Too much snow, not
enough sun, and just trying to deal
with all the slush and ice has been a
real experience for all of us. But, you
have to smile knowing that warmer
weather is literally around the corner
and what you see in front of you will
soon give birth to sprouts of flowers,
plants, and a beautiful spring.
As many of you know, in
addition to our dental practice here in Bay Village, I am
also a dental researcher and consultant to many dental
materials’ companies. These companies constantly are
striving to improve their dental materials, which directly
result in improving the quality of dental care to you. You
will recognize by name - 3M, Rembrandt, Sonicare, Crest,
and others just like those. These companies are wonderful
in that they are willing to dedicate time and money to
research their materials and techniques before they are
brought out to the public.
Our Services Include:
• General & Restorative Dentistry
• Cosmetic Dentistry
• Teeth Whitening
• One-Hour Whitening
• Crowns • Bridges
• Periodontal Treatment
• Root Canal Therapy
• Lumineers
• Botox
• Dermal Fillers - Restylane & Juvederm
440-892-1810
27239 Wolf Road
Bay Village, OH 44140
Louis J. Malcmacher, DDS MAGD
Drs. Gross, Malcmacher, Thaler & Associates, Inc.
The Temptation of the Herd
By Chip Krueger at Stifel Nicolaus
Over time we have seen
that following the herd
when it comes to investing
can be a very dangerous
proposition. While the
herd’s record has been less
than scintillating over the
course of time, investors
still remain tempted to
follow along. We do not
have to go back that far to
see
the
sometimes
disastrous results. The
technology bubble of the
late 1990s led to huge sums
of money flowing into
technology
stocks.
Investors that jumped into
technology investments at
the height of the bubble saw
losses that exceeded 80% in
some cases. We witnessed
another example in the mid
2000s with the herd flocking
to real estate investments an investment that many felt
could never go down. Of
course, now we know that
real estate does not always
appreciate, and sometimes
prices can fall drastically.
So, where was the herd
most recently spotted?
After an extremely difficult
market in 2008, individuals
poured huge sums of money
into bond investments in
2009 and 2010, despite
historically low yields.
While bond funds are
commonly thought to be
“safe investments,” there
may be a lack of
understating between the
relationship of rising
interest rates and the falling
value of bonds.
In simple terms, the
value of a bond will fall in
value as interest rates rise.
For example, let’s assume
you pay $1000 for a 10-year
treasury bond yielding 3%.
The yield to maturity is 3%.
Now let’s assume the next
day rates for a newly issued
10-year treasury bond
increase to 5%. You can
now pay $1000 for a 5%
treasury with a yield to
maturity of 5%. Obviously,
you will not be able to sell
the 3% treasury for $1000
if rates go up to 5%. In
Continued on page 5
by Dr. Louis Malcmacher of The Healthy Smile
Unfortunately, there are
a number of companies that
are willing to develop
materials and products and
just throw them out into the
market place. Some dentists
unwittingly will use these
inferior materials in
patient’s mouth without
knowing that they have not
been well tested and may in
fact fail. This applies to new
technology as well. Don’t be
impressed, as a dental
patient, by what the dentist
may think is the latest and
greatest invention to
dentistry. Ask and find out
what kind of studies have
been done on the materials
going into your mouth and
what is the longevity that
you might expect. I have
personally seen too many
dentists become guinea pigs
for the latest inventions in
dentistry that may not have
been well tested.
In our office, we only
use tried and true dental
materials and techniques
that will provide you with
long lasting, life like
restorations so that you can
always have a healthy smile.
Whenever we do use the
state of the art materials, we
know for a fact that they
have been well tested and
can also withstand the test
of time. We always
encourage our patients to
ask questions because we
know that our best patients
are well-informed patients.
If you have any dental
concerns or would like a
free consultation, feel free
to call us at 440-892-1810
today. As always, our goal
is to help you develop and
maintain a healthy smile
The Villager welcomes letters to the Editor as well as news
items. Please send all information by e-mail or typed. You
must include your name, address, phone number and
signature for verification. All items should be sent to :
illagger
er,, 26915 Westw
estwood
estlakee, OH 44145
The Villa
ood Rd., Suite A-1, Westlak
The Publisher is privileged to revise or reject any advertisement which is deemed
objectionable, either in subject matter or phraseology, or opposed to public policy or
the policy of the paper. The Publisher shall not be held responsible for typographical
errors except to adjust the charge for the first insertion only, by a space credit (in
excess of contract) to be used the following issue. Errors must be reported immediately
and space credit will be limited to such portion of advertisement as may have been
rendered valueless by the error. Please check your advertisement and in the event of
error notify the paper. The Publisher will, upon request, furnish Advertiser with a letter
so worded as to relieve the Advertiser from responsibility for the error. The Publisher
does not assume responsibility for an error in an advertisement other than the above
stated.
... When your contraception fails and
decisions need to be made.
... When pregnancy loss causes pain.
... When baby blues don’t go away.
... When you find yourself single again.
... When STDs have caused sorrow.
All Services Free and Confidential
Jim Sgro - Owner
440-871-0899
620 Dover Center Rd.
Bay Village, Ohio
Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday
Women Helping Women
Free Pregnancy Screening Tests
Cornerstone Among Women
20340 Center Ridge Road
Rocky River, OH 44116
440-356-5565
THE
VILLAGER
Publisher: Villager Press
Phone: 440-899-9277
•
FAX: 440-899-1929
26915 Westwood Rd., Suite A-1, Westlake, OH 44145
E-Mail Address: [email protected]
Website: TheVillagerNewspaper.com
The Villager is a newspaper of general circulation in Westlake, Bay Village, Rocky
River, Lakewood, Avon Lake, Avon, Sheffield, N. Ridgeville, Fairview Park, N.
Olmsted & Olmsted Falls. The Villager is published every other Thursday of each
month, 24 times a year. Subscriptions are $24/year.
Send news items, classifieds, advertising and articles to:
THE VILLAGER • 26915 Westwood Rd., Suite A-1
Westlake, OH 44145
Deadline for all items is the Friday before
publication.Opinions reflected in this newspaper are
not necessarily those of the management.
©2011 The Villager. All rights reserved
St. John Medical Center: A National
Top Cardiovascular Hospital
St. John Medical Center has been named one of the
nation’s 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals by Thomson
Reuters.
The study, now in its twelfth year, for the first time
singled out 50 hospitals rather than the traditional practice
of naming 100 winners. The study examined the
performance of 1,022 hospitals by analyzing outcomes for
patients with heart failure and heart attacks and for those
who received coronary bypass surgery and percutaneous
coronary interventions such as angioplasties.
This is the first time St. John Medical Center has been
recognized with this honor. This year’s winners were
announced November 15, 2010 in Modern Healthcare
magazine.
“We are extremely proud of this recognition,” says Cliff
J. Coker, president, St. John Medical Center. “Our
cardiovascular services are a center of excellence, and this
distinction further emphasizes the high quality of care we
provide as well as our commitment to serving the community
as a healthcare leader.”
“We’ve chosen a more elite group of winners this year.
These hospitals have raised the bar significantly,” said Jean
Chenoweth, senior vice president for performance
improvement and 100 Top Hospitals® program at Thomson
Reuters. “They deliver higher survival rates, shorter hospital
stays, fewer readmissions, and lower costs — which adds
up to enormous value for the communities they serve. As a
result, everyone benefits: patients, families, employers,
insurers and the hospital itself.”
The study shows that 96 percent of cardiovascular
inpatients survive and approximately 93 percent remain
complication-free, indicative of improved cardiovascular
care across-the-board over the past decade. The 50 top
hospitals’ performance surpasses these high-water marks
as indicated by:
• Better risk-adjusted survival rates (33 percent fewer
deaths than non-winning hospitals for bypass surgery).
• Lower complications indices (21 percent lower for
heart failure complications).
• Fewer patients readmitted to the hospital in the 30
days following discharge.
• Shorter hospital visits and lower costs. Top hospitals
discharge heart patients a half day sooner and spend $1,300
less per case than non-winners.
The study evaluated general and applicable specialty,
short-term, acute care, non-federal U.S. hospitals treating a
broad spectrum of cardiology patients.
Thomson Reuters researchers analyzed 2008 and 2009
Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR) data,
Medicare cost reports, and Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare data. They
scored hospitals in key performance areas: risk-adjusted
mortality, risk-adjusted complications, core measures (a
group of measures that assess process of care), percentage
of coronary bypass patients with internal mammary artery
use, 30-day mortality rates, 30-day readmission rates,
severity-adjusted average length of stay, and wage- and
severity-adjusted average cost.
Co-owned by University Hospitals and the Sisters of
Charity of Health System, St. John Medical Center is a
Catholic health care provider celebrating its 30th anniversary
in 2011.
The Temptation of the Herd
Continued from page 4
order for the 3% bond to
trade to an equivalent 5%
yield to maturity, the price
of the bond will fall. Under
this scenario, using a bond
yield calculator, you can
determine that your 3%
treasury bond would drop
roughly 15% to about $850.
This fall is even more
pronounced for longer-term
bonds.
Over the last 30 years
we’ve been in what many
market technicians would
call a bond bull market. We
have seen 30-year Treasury
yields decline from 12% to
4%. Now with rates not far
from an all-time low, and
interest rates widely
expected to drift upwards,
we have investors still
flocking to bonds. Buying
high with the herd and
selling low is a selfdefeating trap that can
wreak havoc on investment
goals.
While I believe bonds
can have their place in a
portfolio or 401(k), I
suggest you talk to an
advisor about how your
bond investments may fare
in an increasing rate
environment.
Chip Krueger is a
Senior Vice President/
Investments with Stifel,
Nicolaus & Company,
Incorporated, member
SIPC and New York Stock
Exchange, Inc. He can be
contacted in the Westlake
office at (440) 835-4170.
Page 5 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
9 Holes of Mini Golf
in the Library!
Enjoy 9 Holes of Mini
Golf with your family on
Fri., April 8 at Westlake
Porter Public Library,
27333 Center Ridge Road
in Westlake. The cost is $15
per team (up to 4 people per
team).Tee Times: 6 p.m., 7
p.m., or 8 p.m. Children
(any age) and adults
welcome!
Stop in at the
Circulation Desk to sign up
for a tee time! Plus: *Raffle
Drawings * Wii Golf and
Dance Revolution * Café
Open * Gift Shop Open *
Used Book Sale Room
Open * Cakewalk
Every player gets one
free raffle ticket, and there
Embroiderers’ Guild of America
will be more for sale! Raffle
Prizes
include: All
American Sports Center
Gift Certificates; Dick’s
Sporting Goods Bonus Gift
Certificates; Alien Mini
Golf Passes; Golf Balls
This event is
brought to you by the
Friends of Westlake R
Porter Public Library.
Sponsorships by Bonnie E
Bell, Mary Kay Boyer,
CPA, Lutheran Home, T
Madison Eye Care
Associates with help A
from Boy Scout Troop
#225
I
L
The North Coast Chapter of The Embroiderers’ Guild
of America meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month
(except Nov and Dec) from 6:30pm-9pm at the North
Olmsted Library, 27403 Lorain Rd, just west of Dover
Center Rd. This month’s project is Birthday Bargello, a
form of needlepoint. All stitchers are welcome to join in
the fun. For more information, please call Christine at 440871-8828.
BUY
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The ApConsignment Store
Upscale
k
undmar
Joyce L
ad
Owner
troit Ro
6
De
1934R7iver, OH 4411
Rocky
6-4747
440-35
m
ahoo.co
[email protected] store.com
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theap w.appleco
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NOT
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Page 6 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
A Christian Success Story:
Stick to the Plan!
Continued from page 1
He has started and managed seven successful health
care companies—three in Ohio—that have gone on to make
$120 million or more.
Rising from street kid to become an Ernst & Young
Entrepreneur of The Year, Dalton is also a Weatherhead
Award winner who makes a humanitarian difference in the
world.
He has also been able to navigate the minefields of
corporate America and still hold fast to principles of
Christian life.
Dalton spoke this month at Church on the Rise in
Westlake, sharing his Christian approach to both living and
business ethics at COR’s “Running with the Giants” monthly
men’s breakfast series.
“The Bible,” said Dalton to an audience of about 100
guests, “Is reserved for those who know Him and accept
His gift.
“AND - it is available to everyone!”
By making use of that availability, you can find answers
to questions that challenge you in life.
And walking the talk is central to his success.
“Everyone knows the Bible verses quoted in Ephesians
2:8 (“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—
and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not
by works....”).
But, he adds, the message that follows in Ephesians
2:10 (“For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus
to do good works....”) is the rallying cry to walk the talk.
Dalton began as a street kid in L.A. pumping gas and
simply surviving. He started in life with plenty of “bad”
and worked his way into lots of “good” by choosing a
Christian path that isn’t always so easy on the surface.
Today, PartsSource is a multi-million dollar company
that ranks 179th nationally in the healthcare industry sector.
PartsSource offers replacement part support for over 2,500
separate makes, models and modalities of hospital
equipment in the market today.
His story begins when he walked into an Air Force
recruiting station as a young man looking for an answer to
poverty and street life.
“You are a smart guy,” the recruiter told him. Dalton
saw an opportunity. “I had never, ever had anyone say
anything encouraging to me. I wasn’t stupid. I just wanted
to be educated,” he said.
He parlayed his military service into a 52-month
education that brought him five certifications in health care.
Curiously, he was also assisted along that path by an
older lady who got to know him and stayed on his case
about church and developing faith.
Help Research
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Old Man in the Kitchen
here, Tom.
Here’s my Old Wives’
Tale for this week: “You’ll
never strain your eyes
looking on the bright side of
things”.
Here’s a delicious soup
recipe for this cold weather,
Seafood Bisque:
Combine 2 Tbs.
Minced Onion, ¾ cup tuna
(drained), 1-1/2 cups
condensed cream of celery
soup, 1-1/4 cups condensed
vegetable soup and 1 tsp.
parsley flakes in a saucepan.
Stir to blend. Simmer for 15
minutes to heat well. If
desired, add 1 cup salmon,
crabmeat or clams in place
of the tuna. Sometimes I use
all the seafood, but you have
to double the soups.
Take care, friends. I’m
waiting to hear of some
“Old Wives’ Tales” from
you. Just send them to this
paper
at
email
[email protected]
and I’ll use them in this
column.
Old Man in the
Kitchen, Tom
Members of the
Cuyahoga West Chapter of
the Ohio Genealogical
Society will offer free
genealogical research
assistance to the public on
Wed., March 2, from 1-2:30
p.m. in the Conference
Room, Westlake Porter
Public Library, 27333
Center Ridge Rd.
If you need help getting
started with researching
your family tree or have
come to a brick wall in your
quest, just bring what
information you have
collected thus far, to this
help session. Members will
help you plan your next
step.
For
additional
information, call 440-8999201 or visit their website
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/
~ohcwogs
Holy Spirit
Parish Ladies
Guild
Holy Spirit Parish
Ladies Guild will meet
Thurs., Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. in
Father Mosovsky Hall, 410
Lear Rd. Avon Lake. Chuck
Howan will present a
program called “ Coffee
101: From Heart to Cup”,
Tasting, Sipping, and
Cupping. Anyone needing a
ride, call 440-933-3387.
She would ask him questions like, “Are you done doing
it by yourself?”
The challenge led Dalton to Biblical insights that put a
rough and tumble childhood that included neglect and
beatings into perspective. By having his faith encouraged,
he was brought to a life-changing realization from the Lord:
“I have not done this to you. I have done this for you,”
was the message.
Dalton began to realize something about tribulation: It
toughened him to walk on a narrow path to success. The
message: “The Lord plucked you out and prepared you in
advance.”
The realization gave Dalton the strength he needed to
make right decisions in the corporate world. Those decisions
meant tough calls: losing a prestigious job for refusing to
misrepresent billings, resisting unsavory business practices,
and staying true to a Christian code.
“I will be bold in Your word!” That is the challenge
Dalton took to heart as he refused to roll over to unethical
corporate policy-makers.
More than once, that commitment put Dalton in tough
spots.
It cost him jobs, and it also put him in a place to
understand his own weaknesses.
“Everyone has lusts,” he said. “Money, greed, love,
materialism. These are the important things we learn about
ourselves – if something makes your vulnerability come
into question again, just stay away from it!
“My prayer is this,” he said: “Where I go, I will be
strong.”
The sharpening of his ethical senses brought Dalton to
management leadership in several successful medical
equipment companies, like National MD, OneSource, TRW
and GE.
Today, he heads PartsSource in Aurora. It is a medical
equipment company with a ministry that recycles and places
used medical devices for third world countries. PartsSource
fills an incredible world-wide need for viable health
equipment rotated out of upgraded American hospital
service.
The opportunity fits Dalton’s mission of success
through service perfectly. It is a business leadership mode
that looks to serve the community and world through
Christian principles.
‘God will reject me if I am just moving with a situation
and waiting for something to happen to me. We are part of
an army of men built to serve when service is required,”
said Dalton.
Dalton says his approach to life’s challenges is valid
for anyone. Just look at it from a Biblical perspective.
“What has God prepared you to do, through bad or
good, and what are the things you can do to bring balance
into your life?” asked Dalton.
For Dalton, that message holds true as time goes on
and also influences his personal life. Sharing an anecdote
about a time when he spent too many hours at work, his
wife joking suggested that, ‘Someday you will come home
and find out your wife is dating somebody else.’
I had to be prepared to be a better man, have better
faith, be a better husband. When I figured that out, my career
just rocketed,” said Dalton.
His book, “Proceed with Confidence,” is a memoir of
lessons learned by this serial entrepreneur. You can find it
on line at www.proceedwithconfidence.com/books/
pwcll.htm.
Rocky River Community Chorus
The Rocky River
Community
Chorus
invites singers from Rocky
River and surrounding
com-munities to join the
50 member group as they
begin preparations for
their spring concerts. The
rehearsals under the
direction of Emily
Ortolano begin on Mon.,
Feb. 28, from 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. at the Rocky
River Middle School,
1631 Lakeview Ave. in the
chorus room, #220. There
are no auditions and no
age restrictions. New
members may attend their
first rehearsal prior to
registration. The fee is
$35. and is payable to the
City of Rocky River, and
goes to the Rocky River
Civic Center, 21016
Hilliard Blvd. Rocky
River, Oh 44116. For
information call 216-3926350.
Avon Lake Red Hat Mamas
Avon Lake Red Hat Mamas will meet at 10:30 a.m. on
Thurs. Feb. 17 at Avon Lake Public Library for brunch.
Jim Smith, Lorain County Historical Society, will present a
program. The cost is $5.00 and will be collect at the door.
Please call 933-6920 to make a reservation.
Page 7 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Lover’s Lanes!
Bay Lanes became
Lover ’s Lanes on
Valentine’s Day as Q104
teamed with Mark &
Tina Nazario of Bay
Lanes for a great night of
fun and romance. Q104
personality Allan Fee
“officiated” as several
dozen couples renewed
wedding vows and
enjoyed an evening of
bowling, romance and
pizza at the festive Bay
Village social destination
where the good times The Q104 Toohey and Fee team joined with Mark &
always roll!
Tina Nazario at Bay Lanes for a special Valentine’s
Day renewal of wedding vows for couples still bowling
each other over after years of marriage.
“Father Fee” on Lover’s Lane!
Bay Lanes became lover’s lane for
married couples who partied on
Valentine’s Day evening with pizza,
bowling and a renewal of wedding
vows for a night out of fun on the
annual romantic holiday occasion.
College Club West
Meeting
College Club West will hold its regular
evening meeting on Wed., March 2 at 7:30
p.m. in the Memorial Hall Wing of Don
Ummerly Civic Center, 21016 Hilliard Blvd.
in Rocky River. The evening’s speaker is
Amy Jamieson -Petonic, Cleveland Clinic
Wellness Manager, whose talk is entitled
“The Wonder Food of Wellness”. Members
and guests are welcome.
Attention Members: At this meeting
voting will take place on changes to the bylaws, which are designed to enlarge the
geographic-area-eligibility for scholarship
recipients. Your vote is important. Please
attend.
LOOKING FOR
A WINTER
ACTIVITY?
ManorCare North Olmsted Celebrates
National Heart Month
Recovering from heartrelated illnesses can be
emotionally and physically
draining to both patients and
their families. It can take
months before patients are
fully able to resume normal
activity and extensive
rehabilitation or lifestyle
changes may be necessary.
As
managed
care
companies seek greater
control over length of
hospital stays, some patients
are discharged before they
are physically ready to go
home. This can result in
frequent readmissions that
are costly to the patient and
the hospital.
ManorCare North
Olmsted is a short-term
rehabilitation and skilled
nursing facility for patients
who need therapy before
returning home. ManorCare North Olmsted
provides physical, occupational and speech therapy,
and specializes in stroke
rehabilitation, orthopedic
services, cardiac recovery
services, wound care, and
more. Working with the
patient, family and doctors,
ManorCare North Olmsted
develops a specialized
recovery plan, setting
appropriate goals designed
to return the patient to the
highest
level
of
independence as quickly as
possible.
“Many people think
that
facilities
like
ManorCare North Olmsted
provide nursing services
only,” Administrator Dan
Zawadzki said. “But that’s
not true. We offer shortterm rehabilitation services
that can prove invaluable to
the overall health and
recovery of the patient.”
Physical therapy plays
a critical role in the recovery
of a cardiac patient, as new
restrictions or changing
abilities affect endurance,
strength and mobility.
ManorCare North Olmsted
offers a wide range of
ambulatory, endurance and
repetitive therapies to help
patients regain as much
function as possible.
ManorCare
North
Olmsted’s specially trained
staff utilizes the latest
equipment and most current
drug treatments to maintain
quality care.
Education plays an
equally important role in the
recovery process. Patients
must learn how to recognize
when they are in trouble or
over-exerting themselves.
ManorCare North Olmsted
teaches patients how to
monitor their pulse and
administer their own
medications in order to live
There’s still
room in our
Adult/Child League
Rehab. It Works!
5 - 7 p.m.
$12. for 2 games for Both!
League will meet twice/month
from until May. What a great
way to have quality time with
your child.
Look at the Evidence
Bay Village Garden Club
The Bay Village Garden Club will have
their next meeting Mon., Feb. 28 at the Bay
Community House, 303 Cahoon Road in Bay
Village. Luncheon is served at 11:30 a.m. The
program “ Damselflies and Dragonflies” will
be presented by Judy Shemroc and Larry
Roche, Field Naturalists at the Cleveland
Museum of Natural History. Com and learn
about these ancient and fascinating insects.
All interested gardeners are welcome.
Call 440-617-0721 or view their website at
bayvillagegardenclub.com
Healing Companions
Westlake Porter Public Library, 27333
Center Ridge Rd will offer on Sun., Feb. 20
(2-3:30 p.m.) Healing Companions - Jane
Miller, LISW, CDBC, author, clinical
psychotherapist and animal therapy expert will
discuss how dogs benefit victims of emotional
illnesses. She will be joined by a client and a
service dog. Copies of her book will be
available for purchase. Please register, 440871-2600 or at www.westlakelibrary.org.
independently. Frequently,
common routines such as
bathing or doing laundry
must be modified to
accommodate the patient’s
cardiac
capabilities.
ManorCare
North
Olmsted’s occupational
therapists work with
patients to teach them new
ways to handle daily tasks
and maximize recovery.
ManorCare North
Olmsted located at 23225
Lorain Road is part of the
HCR ManorCare family.
The HCR ManorCare health
care family comprises
centers that are leading
providers of short-term
post-acute services and
long-term care. With
60,000
caregivers
nationwide, the HCR
ManorCare centers are
preeminent care providers
in their communities.
Quality care for patients and
residents is provided
through a network of more
than 500 skilled nursing and
rehabilitation centers,
assisted living facilities,
outpatient rehabilitation
clinics, and hospice and
home health care agencies.
These locations operate
primarily under the
respected
Heartland,
ManorCare Health Services
and Arden Courts names.
average Functional
Independence Measure
(FIM) gain compared to
60.1% nationwide rehab
hospital average.*
Meet New Friends and
Have a Ball!
You won’t strike out
at Bay Lanes!
27229 Wolf Rd.,
Bay Village
440-871-0911
Speak with Mark
www.BayLanesBowl.com
Mar
gar
et
e Succ
ess St
or
Margar
garet
ete
Success
Stor
oryy :
“The choice to come to ManorCare Health Services
– North Olmsted was made by my daughter. She
came for a tour and was very impressed and said
this is the place where my mother will get the
best care. Thank goodness for her choice! I highly
recommend ManorCare – North Olmsted to
anyone who needs a skilled rehabilitation facility.
My therapy at ManorCare was so thorough that
within 4 weeks, I became independent! I started
needing a walker, then I graduated to a cane, then
I did not need the cane. I call all the employees
who I came in contact with my ‘angels’!”
*Data gathered for time period 3rd Quarter
2009 through 2 nd Quarter 2010 based on
patients discharged from ManorCare Health
Services – North Olmsted.
ManorCare Health
Services – North Olmsted
23225 Lorain Road,
North Olmsted, OH 44070
440.779.6900
www.hcr-manorcare.com
Page 8 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Join the Mission of
Community West Foundation
to advance the health and well being of our community.
Community West Foundation
Straight from the Heart: A Red Tie Gala!
The 7th annual Straight from the Heart Red Tie Gala to
benefit Cleveland Clinic Regional Hospitals was as hot as a
blazing Valentine Saturday evening at LaCentre in Westlake.
Presented each year by Community West Foundation and
Lakewood Hospital Foundation, this premier fundraiser offered
a spectacular mix of great food and top entertainment for 500
guests who celebrated the gift of philanthropy in style!
Dr. David Bronson, President Cleveland Clinic Regional
Hospitals, welcomed guests to an off-the-charts night of music,
prizes and, most of all, priceless support for excellence in community healthcare.
Musical hit of the night was La Bamba and the Hubcaps
straight out of New York. La Bamba is known from his appearances on The Late Show with Conan O’Brien Show nightly!
Proceeds from the event support Regional Heart Centers
that provide the most comprehensive resources available for the
prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart disease.
“In partnership with each other and with the Cleveland Clinic,
Dr. David Bronson, President and CEO Cleveland Clinic our hospitals continue to share best practices and resources to
Regional Hospitals, and his wife Dr. Kathleen Franco.
Continued on page 11
The $100,000 Grand Prize winners Pam & Terry Kilbourne.
Fred DeGrandis, Chairman Cleveland Clinic Community Physician
Community West Foundation Trustee, Harry A. Zilli, Jr. and his Partnership & Quality Alliance and his wife Nora, with Janice
COO, Fairview Hospital, John Mills and his wife Dr. Debbie wife, Sharon, with North Coast Health Ministry’s Lee Elmore and Murphy, President, Fairview & Lakewood Hospitals, Mistress of
Ghazoul-Mills with Thomas V. Chema, President of Hiram Col- her husband, Larry.
Ceremonies Monica Robins, Senior Health Correspondent,
lege, and Joan Mason, President, The Gateway Group.
WKYC-TV 3 and her husband, Dave Kumler.
Straight from the Heart Committee Members, Meg Leneghan, Mary Community West Foundation Special Events Coordinator, Dr. David Bronson, President and CEO Cleveland Clinic Regional
Pat Kubene-Simacek with Committe Member, Chase Getz. Hospitals, thanks the guests for their wonderful support of the gala.
Horoszko, Mindy Basler and Gwen Print.
Join the mission of The Community West Foundation to advance the health and well being of our community. At a time when there is so
much need, the Foundation is helping others through grants, donations and service. Won’t you join us and help those less fortunate. A
donation to the Community West Foundation stays right in our community and helps our neighbors most in need. Contact the Community
West Foundation at 216-476-7060 or visit www.communitywestfoundation.org for more information.
Page 9 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Would you like to
Feed the Hungry?
Shelter the Homeless?
Care for the Sick?
A Donor-Advised Fund
is a great way to support your favorite charities.
www.communitywestfoundation.org
216-476-7060
Page 10 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Bay Village Antiques Show and Sale
Along
with
the
opportunity to see and
purchase quality antiques,
attendees of the Bay Village
Women’s Club Foundation’s 42nd Annual
Antique Show and Sale may
again have an item of
jewelry or personal antique
appraised. While the
appraisals are not in depth
as for insurance purposes,
they are helpful in knowing
whether you have just a
beloved family piece or a
valuable treasure.
With the huge interest
in the jewelry appraisals
done last year, Leonard
Strnad II of Vivid
Diamonds, Design &
Timepiece Gallery in Bay
Square is returning for his
second year at the show. The
jeweler, who has received a
“Best of Show” in Ohio and
a a worldwide prestigious
JCK 2nd Place Award in a
diamond
category,
examined pieces with a
wide range of appraised
value. “People were happy
with the results of their
appraisal which averaged
about $75. Many brought in
estate jewelry including
wristwatches and pocket
watches, some of which
were solid gold.” said
Strnad. One of the most
unusual pieces brought in
was made of bone, not
within his expertise!
Dealer, Joseph Davis,
will be displaying and
selling a wide selection of
Cowan Pottery which was
made in the Cowan Studio
in Rocky River. Other
antiques being sold will be
country and formal period
furniture, art, glass,
primitives, jewelry and
more.
The show is being held
at Bay High School, 29230
Wolf Road on Sat., Feb. 19
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
on Sun., Feb. 20 from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. The free
jewelry appraisal will be
from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday
and the antique appraisal
from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday.
Numbered tickets, with
show ticket purchase, will
be distributed for the
appraisals
The Wee Wardrobe: A Kids Resale Event
Lake Shore United
Methodist Church presents
The Wee Wardrobe, a Kids
Resale Event. Individuals
will be selling like-new
maternity, baby and
children’s clothes, as well as
gear, accessories, toys and
more. The Wee Wardrobe is
from 8 a.m.- noon on March
Refreshments will be
available for purchase at the
show. The facility is
wheelchair accessible, but
baby strollers are not
allowed. The parking is free
adjacent to the auditorium
door. The entrance donation
of
$6. supports the
scholarship fund of the
foundation. For information
call 440-808-9834 or 440871-3075.
26. Admission is $1. or a
non-perishable
food
donation.
Tables are available for
$20. The money collected
from the admission and
table fees will be used to
support the church’s
Christian
Education
Department. Please call
933-5238
with
any
questions. LakeShore
United Methodist Church is
located at 33119 Electric
Blvd. in Avon Lake.
Contracts can be
downloaded from the
church’s website: gbgm-
umc.org/lakeshoreumc/
Wee%20Wardrobe%20Contract.pdf
The Easy Step™ : Install Before you Fall!
THE BAY VILLAGE WOMEN’S
CLUB FOUNDATION
41st Annual
SHOW & SALE
Bay Village High School
29230 Wolf Road
Bay Village, Ohio
Auditorium Entrance Only
Sat. Feb 19 - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sun. Feb 20 - 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Free Appraisals for Jewelry - Saturday, 1 - 3 p.m.
Limit 1 Item
Free Appraisals for Articles - Sunday, 1 - 3 p.m.
Limit 1 Item
Wheelchair Accessible - No Strollers Allowed
For Information, call
440-808-9834 or 440-871-3075
$6.00 Donation - Support Our Scholarship Fund
No room poses a bigger
threat to safety for the
elderly than the bathroom.
The greatest danger is
slipping and falling when
entering and exiting the
bathtub, which contributes
to nearly 25% of hospital
admissions for people age
65 and older.
The Easy Step™ by
Miracle Method, increases
bathroom safety by creating
a 24" by 9" opening,
allowing the user to step
through, not over the tub.
“It’s not uncommon for an
elderly person to lose their
balance when lifting their
leg over a tub,” according
to Andrew Gorski, owner of
Miracle
Method
of
Cleveland. The Easy
Step™,
along
with
installation of safety grab
bars and slip resistant
surfaces, greatly reduces the
risk of slip and fall
accidents.
An affordable solution,
the Easy Step™ costs a
fraction of expensive walk
in bathtubs and takes only
one day to install. Walk in
tubs typically require
tearing out the old bathtub,
removing walls, and
performing
extensive
plumbing modifications. In
addition, walk in tubs use
significant amounts of water
and take time to fill and
empty while the user waits
in the tub.
“What care givers
really like about the Easy
Step™ is its simplicity and
the speed in which we can
make the installation,” says
Gorski. “A homeowner can
be using their tub the same
day we do the installation.”
Miracle Method can
also install safety grab bars,
hand held shower nozzles,
curved shower rods and
even slip resistant tub
surfaces. “Our goal,”
according to Gorski, “is to
provide a safer bathroom
environment for our elderly
customers which will allow
them to stay independent
and live in their own homes
longer.”
“Another advantage to
the Easy Step™ besides
price over expensive walkin tubs, is that if the
removed piece is saved,”
says Gorski, “it can be
replaced at a later date and
you’ll never know the
conversion had been made.”
This is a welcome feature
for family members who
may be faced with
eventually selling the house.
Unlike major walk-in or
door tub installations, the
ability to return the
bathroom to normal makes
the house easier to sell.
“Nobody wants to buy a
house that requires the
expense and mess of
removing a bulky walk-in
bathtub that you don’t want
or need”, adds Gorski.
Gorski offers advice to
senior citizens and their
family caregivers looking
for easier bathtub access.
Avoid high-pressure sales
people who won’t quote
prices over the phone and
always have someone with
you to help you make the
best decision for your
situation. Avoid solutions
that will not only cost
thousands to install, but
thousands to replace.
Many Easy Step™
customers also use Miracle
Method’s
refinishing
process to change the color
of a dated tub and tile at the
same time. “Having all the
work done at once allows us
to pass on cost savings. We
realize that many of our
elderly customers are on
fixed incomes and we want
to make this experience
easy,
timely
and
affordable,” says Gorski.
A lifelong Cleveland
resident,
Gorski
is
committed to providing the
highest quality work. His
office not only offers the
Easy Step™, but surface
refinishing for bathtubs, tile,
vanities and kitchen
countertops, all with a
five-year guarantee. To
learn more, log on to
www.miraclemethod.com/
cleveland or call 216 6713444 for a free, no pressure
in home appointment.
Miracle Method was
awarded Best in Category
for 2010
Make your bathtub safer with the Easy Step™!
The affordable bathtub safety conversion...
In just one day Miracle Method can make your
bathroom safer and more convenient with the
Easy Step… at a fraction of the cost of walk in tubs.
Miracle Method - Cleveland
12438 Plaza Drive • Parma, OH 44130
“I gave my mother an Easy Step™.
It gave her confidence and peace of mind.”
216-671-3444
216-671-4404 fax
www.MiracleMethod.com/EasyStep
Page 11 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Join the Mission of
Community West Foundation
to advance the health and well being of our community.
Community West Foundation
Straight from the Heart: A Red Tie Gala!
Continued from page 8
Music by La Bamba and The Hubcaps.
ensure excellence in our programs and our
cardiac outcomes,” said Dr. Bronson. “Taking excellent care of our patients is our number one priority!”
Every year, Straight from the Heart provides significant financial support to
Fairview, Lakewood, Lutheran and Medina
Hospitals to better respond to the cardiovascular needs of the community.
With a $100,000 grand prize followed
by a cavalcade of total of 39 other terrific
prizes, guests had a whopping good time
raffle tickets were pulled for everything from
a 24 month lease on a brand new Camaro,
to a sleek Harley-Davidson, to several luxury
vacations and even fine jewelry!
David T. Dombrowiak, President and CEO Community West Foundation,
and his wife Mary Ann (back row), with friends Leo and Dottie Buckon,
City of Lakewood Director Department of Human Services, pose with the
Harley-Davidson Motorcycle.
Dennis and Kathryn Roche, Lakewood
Ginger and Ted Vaughan enjoy the Beth and Dr. Steven Lamb, Commu- Hospital Board of Trustees, always
night’s festivities.
nity West Foundation Trustee.
ready to support a community cause.
Lois and Dr. James Magisano, Community West Foundation Trustee
with Nancy and Rob Stall, President Medina Hospital.
Dr. Antonios Paras, Fairview/Lutheran Hospitals Board
of Trustees, with his wife Jeanne.
Drs. Prasanta and Chandra Raj looked fashionable
at the Straight from the Heart event.
Dr. Ravi Bolla with Shelley and Dr. Marcello Mellino helped to celebrate the event..
Join the mission of The Community West Foundation to advance the health and well being of our community. At a time when there is so
much need, the Foundation is helping others through grants, donations and service. Won’t you join us and help those less fortunate. A
donation to the Community West Foundation stays right in our community and helps our neighbors most in need. Contact the Community
West Foundation at 216-476-7060 or visit www.communitywestfoundation.org for more information.
Page 12 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
Tri-C Westshore Campus Opens in Westlake
Dr. J. Michael
Thomson, President
Cuyahoga Community
College Westshore
Campus, and Robert
Searson, Academic
Dean, display a state-ofthe art medical training
station complete with
fully-lifelike manikin
patient and computer
displays for hands-on
student experience at
the new Westlake Tri-C
location.
Now le
b
Availas Best”
tle’
“SeatCoffee
fresh choices for
Breakfast
All Day Breakfast Sandwiches!
.
h
s
e
r
f
t
ea
Valid Only At:
27237 Wolf Rd. • Bay Village
871-2006
Fax your Order
440-871-0669
NOW OPEN FOR BREAKFAST
New Open Hours
7:00 a.m.
A team of nursing students in the fully lifelike
hospital setting at the new Cuyahoga Community
College Westshore Campus.
prototype of educational
excellence in the 21st
century.
There is a heavy
emphasis on medical
training at the school.
Associate degrees are
offered in nursing, medical
assisting and emergency
medical
technology.
Certificate programs exist
for emergency medical
technology,
medical
assisting, polysomnography
and State Tested Nursing
Assistant.
“There are excellent
opportunities for students to
complete an associate
Avon-On-The-Lake Garden Club Workshop
Avon-on-the- Lake
Garden Club to hold a
Flower
Arranging
Workshop on Wed., March
2 at 10 a.m. at Avon Lake
Public Library, 32649
Electric Blvd. Club member
Jo’C Walker, a nationally
accredited flower judge will
instruct how to create
vertical and horizontal mass
Meatball Marinara
Cold Cut Combo
Spicy Italian
Veggie Delite®
Black Forest Ham
Oven Roasted Chicken Breast
BLT
Tuna
Before School Starts
“A campus is a
permanent commitment to
community,” said President,
Dr. J. Michael Thomson, as
he welcomed students to the
first day of classes at the
new Cuyahoga Community
College Westshore Campus
in Westlake.
The $24.3 million
investment into higher
education on the far west
side officially became real
in its mission to meet the
educational needs of the
residents in the Westshore
communities January 18.
“The
Westshore
campus is poised to be a
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering &
Math) campus with focus on
these four areas of
education,” added Robert
Searson, Academic Dean of
the new campus.
Everything about the
new campus is state-of-theart. From high tech learning
stations where information
technology is accessible 24/
7, to comprehensively
engineered “smart” stations
in classrooms where
instructors can access a
panoply of data sources for
immediate presentation to
students, the campus is a
line designs incorporating
the principles and elements
of flower design. Lunch
will be at noon, followed by
Armgard Hartitz, club
member ,and horticulturist
& landscape architect, will
demonstrate how to prepare
horticulture for a flower
show. For information call
440-937-4331.
Phone:
440-353-3755
33113 Center Ridge Rd. Mills Creek Plaza
North Ridgeville, Ohio 44039
Hours:
Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Closed Sunday & Wednesday
Lori Michelle Irena Tony Tony Josie
degree for transfer to a
four-year institution or for
entry into the workforce in
business and a variety of
health careers areas,”
added Searson.
More than 25 per cent
of Tri-C students now
focus on health-career
related fields. Tri-C is tops
in Ohio and 10th
nationally in conferring
associate degrees in health
professions and related
clinical sciences. More
than 85 per cent of Tri-C
grads find jobs in northeast
Ohio.
Cleveland
Clinic
Concert
Band
Friends of Porter
Public Library will host
their Sunday Sounds
Program featuring The
Cleveland Clinic Concert
Band on Feb. 27, 2 p.m. in
the Porter Room of
Westlake Porter Public
Library, 27333 Center
Ridge Rd. in Westlake.
The Cleveland Clinic
Concert Band, 30 members
strong, is comprised of
doctors (active and retired),
nurses, technicians, and
volunteers. Their music
director and conductor is
Roy Hawthorne.
Bay Village Citizen & Project of the Year Honored
The Bay Village
Community
Council
honored Lawrence Kuh as
the city’s 2011 Citizen of the
Year, and the 2010
bicentennial celebration its’
Project of the Year.
All were recognized at
a reception held at Bay
Lodge Sunday afternoon
Kuh, a fifth-grade
teacher at Bay Middle
School and the married
father of three, was selected
for his leadership of the Bay
Skate and Bike Park
Foundation, which for 6
years
worked
to
substantially fund, design
and construct a skateboard
and bicycle park in the city.
“Kuh was the face and
voice of the project,” one
nomination read. “Through
multiple site changes that
required meeting with city
departments, planners and
designers to repeatedly
change site designs and
satisfy the various city
boards, Lawrence spearheaded the skate park
project
through
to
completion.”
“Lawrence was able to
keep this project moving
forward, despite roadblocks
and opposition, using the
process to teach his young
group
of
skating
enthusiasts…Not only did
Lawrence give these
children an opportunity to
develop life-long skills in
planning a project and
seeing it to completion, he
also brought a diverse group
of supporters together for a
common good.”
The
bicentennial
celebration, headed by a
committee comprised of
Ward 1 Councilman Dave
Tadych, Bay Village
Historical Society President
Carole Roske, coordinator
Evelyn Allen and historical
society treasurer Tom
Phillips, was handily
selected as project of the
year, even the bicentennial.
The committee spearheaded efforts that raised
almost $70,000 for the
city’s two-day birthday
celebration, which included
a grand parade, video
presentation, birthday cake
and fireworks display.
“Individuals, civic
organizations, businesses
and all of Bay’s churches
joined hands and worked
and planned for almost two
years to prepare for this
moving 200-years-ofhistory
celebration,”
according
to
one
nomination. “Past residents
from all over the country
came home to celebrate and
remember their Bay
heritage.”
“It was truly an effort
by all city residents, from its
youth to its seniors, that
every day make our city the
special place we all love so
completely,” read another.
“The committee’s
selection of Kuh as citizen
of the year was easy because
he worked tirelessly for the
skate and bike park,”
Community
Council
President Eric Eakin said.
“And the group’s selection
of the bicentennial as
project of the year was
unanimous and without
hesitation.”
Westside Christian
Academy
Open House
Sat. March 5
1 to 4 p.m.
Lawrence Kuh is congratulated by Eric Eakin as Bay
Village Citizen of the Year.
needs would have been
protected.
Measuring the Value
of the Stay-at-Home
Spouse
Despite the importance
of the stay-at-home parent,
there’s little research to
quantify its value. In its May
8, 2008, Mom Salary
Survey, Salary.com reported
the ten most popular
functions performed by
mothers
equates
to
$116,805 per year vs. a
working mother’s salary of
$68,405. It further states the
stay-at-home spouse works
a 94-hour week, serving as
housekeeper, teacher, cook,
psychologist, and van driver
— in short, functioning as a
CEO at home.
Flexible, Customizable Choices
The type of policy you
select depends on your
needs and budget. Term life
insurance
provides
affordable coverage for
several years. In contrast
permanent life insurance
provides protection for your
Westside Christian Academy
23096 Center Ridge Road
Westlake, OH 44145
www.westsideacademy.org
A delightful opportunity to experience westside
Cleveland’s only classical Christian school. Staff
will be available to discuss the unique advantages
for your children at WCA.
Special sessions at 1:30—Kindergarten the WCA
Way, 2:00—Why Latin? and 2:30—Striving
Through the Middle School Years.
Dave Tadych, Tom Phillips, Carole Roske, Eric Eakin
and Evelyn Allen, Bay Village Project of the Year for
the city’s bicentennial celebration.
Protecting the Stay-at-Home Spouse
When married couples
have young children, often
one spouse stays home
while the other works
outside the home. While
most parents understand the
necessity of purchasing a
life insurance policy on the
income earner, few realize
the importance of also
insuring the stay-at-home
spouse.
Being Prepared for
the Unexpected
What if the stay-athome spouse suddenly
became ill, disabled or
died? The family would be
devastated. Friends and
family members would
initially pitch in to help. But,
eventually they would
return to their regular lives.
Before the surviving spouse
returned to work, a
caretaker for the children
and home would need to be
hired, presenting a potential
financial hardship. But, had
life insurance been
purchased on the stay-athome parent, the family’s
Page 13 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
entire life (provided
premiums are paid) and
accumulates cash value taxdeferred. This cash value
can be accessed (unpaid
loans accrue interest and
reduce policy’s cash value
and death benefit). Plus,
riders, available with term
and
permanent
life
insurance, enable you to
customize your policy to
meet and grow with your
changing needs.
The loss of a parent is
hard enough on a family;
purchasing
insurance
coverage for a stay-at-home
spouse can help ensure that
it doesn’t become a
financial hardship as well.
This educational thirdparty article is being
provided as a courtesy by
Michael Douglas, Financial
Services Professional, New
York Life Insurance
Company. To learn more
about the information or
topics discussed, please
contact me at (216) 4702728.
Children 3+ are invited to a FunFair in the
gymnasium while parents tour the school.
Page 14 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
West Shore Conference Wrestling:
M
Bay Crowns Two!
idview High in
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West Shore Conference
wrestling title Saturday
with some strong local con
nections in Bay High alum
Donnie Caramell as head
coach and former Avon
Lake High great Shawn
Bristow as assistant coach.
Caramell and Bristow
have been building the
Middie program for several
years, and this winter took
the top prize at the league
meet hosted at Vermilion
Saturday.
Midview went un
defeated in WSC action
this year and posted 205.5
points to outdistance sec
ond place North Ridgeville
(69.5) easily. Avon was
third.
Caramell was named
WSC Coach of the Year
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champs and had 8 wrestlers
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Avon Lake High.
Josh Ayers (130), Tyler
Gusky (140), Zach From
bach (152), Adam Davis
(171) and Dominic Zunis
(285) were the Midview
winners.
Ben and Adam Tepper
had a great tournament for
Bay High. Ben won at 103
pounds and Adam took the
112 pound title.
Alan McClain and
Bay’s Adam Tepper on his way to a 9-6 win over Vinny Lupico of
Midview for a West Shore Conference wrestling crown.
Matt Mahoney then won
for Rocky River at 119
and 125 pounds while Matt
Zepp of North Ridgeville
WRRN¿UVWDW
Zane Zeman of Avon
won at 145 and Brandon
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North Ridgeville at 160.
Mike Mees of North
5LGJHYLOOH ZDV ¿UVW DW and at 215 Hamza Kirresh
of Avon took the top spot.
Caramell is a 1997
grad of Bay High and Bris
tow graduated from Avon
Lake in 1996. They both
starred on Southwestern
Conference mats in their
scholastic days.
Matt Zepp of North Ridgeville (bottom) fought off
Ayoub Kirresh of Avon for the 135 crown at the
WSC wrestling championship at Vermilion Saturday.
Bay’s Nick Dorsey placed third at 125 pounds
with a pin over Conrad Doehne of Midview.
Ben Tepper of Bay High battles North Ridgeville’s Drew Dickson on his way to the 103
pound title at the WSC championships. Tepper
posted a 4-2 overtime decision.
Bay’s Max Langer posts a third place win over
Nick Deems of Rocky River.
Stuckart Wins SWC Title for Westlake
C
ongratulations
to Westlake High senior
Sheldon Stuckart on his
152 championship at the
Southwestern Conference
Championship at Midpark
High last Saturday.
Stuckart capped a
great regular season with a
GUDPDWLFZLQRYHU$Q
drew Barr of Brecksville
%URDGYLHZ+WVLQWKH¿QDOV
Stuckart gamely fought
off a solid single leg take
down shot by Barr through
WKH¿QDOVHFRQGVRIWKH
match to stay off the mat
and lodge the win.
Sheldon and his dad,
Tom, were emotionally
drained after the win for
a couple reasons. Sheldon
wasn’t going to wrestle
this season, opting instead
to follow his weightlifting
dreams that have brought
him national acclaim in
recent years. But a late
summer hand injury forced
him into rehab and he went
back out for the wrestling
team instead.
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his dad, Tom, who was a
member of the Bay High
state championship team
in 1972. “I always pushed
him into wrestling. But
after the injury it was his
choice to come back,” said
the understandably proud
dad.
Before returning to
wrestling this season, Shel
don won a USA Weightlift
ing Las Vegas Open in the
105 kilo snatch and set the
national mark in Olympic
weightlifting this past Au
gust.
His wrestling season
has been spectacular as
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as sectionals approach.
From weightlifting to
wrestling, Sheldon Stuck
art has the heart of a cham
pion. Congratulations!
Right: Westlake senior Sheldon Stuckart
won a coveted SWC
wrestling title last
weekend.
Bottom: Sheldon
Stuckart - winning
at the USA Open
Weightlifting Championships in Las Vegas
last summer.
Avon’s Jake DeLorge celebrates his third place
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St. Ed Wrestlers Prepare for
Tournament Run
Page 15 - THE VILLAGER - February 17 - 23, 2011
I
t has been a year
since the St. Edward High
wrestling team began a
state tournament run that
resulted in an unusual secRQGSODFH¿QLVKIRUWKHSHrennial Ohio powerhouse
team.
This season, Ed’s has
its eyes on reclaiming the
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to Wadsworth at last year’s
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the journey this week with
the sectional tournament.
Ed’s won the state dual
meet championships this
winter and also topped Div.
II power St. Paris Graham
in a January barnburner to
regain the state’s top ranking. Although Ed’s lost to
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Jersey two weeks ago,
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lineup and a renewed resolve mean the Eagles are
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to the school’s state tournament legacy in March.
Far Top Right: Ty Walz at 215 pounds is expected to be a force for St. Edward through
the state tournament run this winter. He posted a big win over Blair Academy two weeks
DJR+HZDVD&DGHW1DWLRQDOFKDPSODVWVXPPHULQ)DUJR1'DQGDOVRSODFHG¿IWKDW
the Walsh Ironman in December.
Close Right: St. Edward High sophomore Domenic Abounader is a force at 160 pounds.
In posting a big win over Blair Academy two weeks ago, Abounader hopes to keep the
celebration going in Columbus at the state meet in March.
River Boys Pace WSC Hoops
1RZ RYHUDOO DQG
LQ:HVW 6KRUH &RQIHUence play, the Rocky River
High boys basketball team
took charge in league play
ZLWK D ZLQ RYHU
Avon.
The decision avenged
a December loss to the Eagles and put River in conWUROLQWKH:6&$YRQIHOO
WRZLWKWKHORVV
-LPP\ &RUULJDQ OHG
WKHZD\ZLWKSRLQWV
LQWKHVHFRQGKDOIDV5LYHU
SXOOHG DZD\ $YRQ IHOO WR
LQ WKH OHDJXH ZLWK WKH
ORVV DV WKH (DJOHV VXIIHUHG
WKURXJKD¿UVWKDOIVFRULQJ
GURXJKW DQG IDLOHG WR UHcover.
Returning state place winner Mark Martin should help
the St. Edward High wrestling team in its post season
tournament run this month.
Michael Pavlik of
Rocky River controls the ball in
a rebound battle
against Avon.
Jimmy Corrigan had the hot hand for Rocky River as the Pirates
closed in on the West Shore Conference title with a victory over
Avon.
Avon’s Claude Gray looks for a bucket against Rocky River. The powerful foreward
has been a team leader this year, guiding the Eagles to a 13-5 overall record and 9-2
conference record where they are in second place.
Claude Gray of Avon and
Rocky River’s James Meyer
battle it out under the boards.
When You’re Looking for Help Around the Home or at Work...
Marvin Coleman of Avon High collects a rebound
against Rocky River, but the Pirates went on to
win the pivotal WSC game against the Eagles.
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